Literacy in a digital age: a challenge for language teachers? Turku Finland August 2016

  • Published on
    11-Apr-2017

  • View
    153

  • Download
    2

Transcript

  • 3rd Baltic Sea 17th Nordic LiteracyConference

    1416 August 2016 Turku/bo, Finland

    Making meaning literacy in action

    Jeroen Clemens Literacy in a digital age: a challenge for

    language teachers?

    www.jeroenclemens.nl@jeroencl; contact@jeroenclemens.nl

  • 1. Language Teacher

    2. Researcher New Literacies / Online literacy

    3. Consultant/ writer/ speaker

    Teacher trainer

    Head Language department

  • jeroenclemens.nl

    Jeroen Clemens

  • ability to understand, evaluate, useand engage with written texts toparticipate in society, to achieveones goals, and to develop onesknowledge and potential (OECD 2013)

  • Print media

    Lineair

    Single text

    Fixed structure

    Textual

    Static

    One-way

    Clear author

    Online media

    Non-lineair Hypertext

    Connected texts

    Multiple structures

    Multimodal Multi Media

    Flexible / Changing

    Interactive

    Not always clear author

    Not only written texts

  • offline 1. Traditional print reading

    2. Multi document reading: analysis & synthesis

    3. Reading online: search, evaluate, synthesis & communicate

    Expand definition Literacy

    Expand PedagogyCho & Afflerbach, 2010

  • Digital natives are competent readers online?

  • New & aditional skills and strategies needed

    Many students are not competent: see reading list

  • jeroenclemens.nl

    Digital natives

    Diataal (Haquebord)

    ORCA Nederlands (Clemens)

    eigen onderzoek

    zoeken evalueren synthese

    synthese

    schrijven

    zoeken

    schrijven

    synthese

    evalueren

    Additional competencies

    Co Ev

    Se

    Sy

    Traditional Reading test

    ORCA Dutch version Clemens

  • Baseline study: Language Teachers Secondary Schools (online, 309)

    Perceptions Attitudes & believes Knowledge & Skills Motivation & Needs

  • 63% perceives online texts different from offline texts

    84% online reading comprehension asks for new skills and strategies

    90% students need to learn online reading comprehension skills and

    (86%) they need education in online reading comprehension

  • 73% current curriculum is not sufficient for preparing students for online reading comprehension.

    75% online reading comprehension must be included in the curriculum, the common core standards (65%) and in text books / learning materials (87%).

    There is less agreement (37%) whether online reading comprehension must become a part of the national assessment program of Dutch or on the more pedagogical question if online reading comprehension must become a separate course in textbooks (32%).

  • 70% think there is not enough attention for online reading comprehension in their current teaching materials.

    17% include online reading comprehension in their teaching.

    7% develop lessons or teaching materials for online reading comprehension

    84% dont collaborate with colleagues on this topic (84%).

  • 10% think school finds online literacy important.

    15% positive when looking at their department (15%).

    18% see initiatives happening at department level

    but its a tough question: a lot of teachers are neutral on this item (school: 33%, department: 50%).

  • 71% say they need professional development to be able to teach online literacy

    This has top priority

  • Top down 5-10 National Standards, Assessment,

    Publishers/Textbooks, Teacher training institutes; accessible knowledge

    Implement in teacher training programs 3-5

    Bottom up/ now own initiatives: school and teacher initiatives

    and collaboration, teacher development teams, conferences, teacher training institutes

  • Relate own curriculum/ learning goalsConnect, recognisable terminology: Lets work on

    Critical Reading Plus, expand search strategies to online texts

    Target language teachers first & earlyadopters cross curriculum

    Work in teacher development teams Co-create / use each others materials

    regional and nationallyShare and collaborate online

  • Afflerbach, P., & Cho, . Y. (2009). Identifying and describing constructively responsive comprehension strategies in new and traditional forms of reading. In S. E. Israel & G. G. Duffy, Handbook of Research on Reading Comprehension. New York: Routledge.

    Cho, B.-Y., & Afflerbach, P. (2015). Reading on the Internet. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 58(6)

    Castek, J., & Coiro, J. (2015). Understanding What Students Know. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 58(7)

    Donald J Leu, J., McVerry, J. G., O'Byrne, I., Kiili, C., Zawilinski, L., Everett-Cacopardo, H., et al. (2011). The new literacies of online reading comprehension: Expanding the literacy andlearning curriculum. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 55(1).

    Leu, D. J., Kulikowich, J. M., Sedransk, N., Coiro, J., Liu, C., Cui, W., et al. (2014). The ORCA Project: Designing Technology-based Assessments for Online Research, Comprehension, And Communication. American Educational Research Conference. Philidelphia.

    Leu, D. J., Forzani, E., Burlingame, C., Kulikowich, J., Sedransk, N., Coiro, J., & Kennedy, C. (2013). The new literacies of online research and comprehension: Assessing and preparing students for the 21st century with Common Core State Standards. In L. B. Gambrell & S. B. Neuman, Reading instruction in the age of common core standards. Newark, DE: IRA.

    OECD. (2011). PISA 2009 Results: Students On Line (Vol. VI, p. 395). OECD Publishing. doi:10.1787/9789264112995-en

    OECD (2014). PISA 2012 Results: What Students Know and Can Do Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science (Volume I, Revised edition), PISA, OECD Publishing.

  • http://jeroenclemens.nl

    contact@jeroenclemens.nl

    @jeroencl

    Download on http://literacyeurope.org http://www.slideshare.net/jeroencl

Recommended

View more >