ePortfolio & Open Badges Maturity Matrix

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The Europortfolio team presented on July 2 2014 the "ePortfolios and Open Badges Maturity Matrix". The objective was to collect feedback from practitioners and experts on a document that is aimed at helping organisations to plan and reflect on current developments and lay the foundations for the development of a review tool (self-assessment) that will be used to plan, monitor and review ePortfolios and Open Badges policies, technologies and practices. What was presented is an alpha version (draft) of the Matrix and we are looking forward to the feedback of the community to produce a beta version that will be used to build the self-assessment tool. Based on the outcomes of the self-assessment tool's exploitation, a final version of the Matrix will be produced. If you want to start contributing, the maturity matrix is accessible at: * http://bit.ly/mmpdf - a pdf to download * http://bit.ly/mmgdoc - a Google doc open for comments. Editing rights will be provided to those willing to work with us

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1. Evaluation Report EPORTFOLIOS & OPEN BADGES MATURITY MATRIX THE EUROPORTFOLIO / EPNET PROJECT IS FUNDED WITH SUPPORT FROM THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION. LEARNINGINTHE21STCENTURY ePortfolio & Open Badges Maturity Matrix Supporting Open Innovation in Education Serge Ravet EUROPORTFOLIO ADPIOS, EUROPORTFOLIO This project has been funded with support from the European Commission.This publication reects the views only of the authors, and theCommission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of theinformation contained therein. Europortfolio Webinar 2 July 2014 2. http://courses.foi.hr:9001/p/Maturity_Matrix Etherpad notes 3. Welcome 5' participants introduce themselves Who are you?Why are you here?What are your expectations? 15' Presentation 30' Open discussion 10' Action planning What to do next? Format of the session 4. Background 5. ePortfolio Maturity Matrix Sources (extract) 6. ? ePortfolio Maturity Matrix? ePortfolios Products Processes Services Platforms as ePortfolios vs Open Badges ePortfolio Maturity Matrix vs Learning Maturity Matrix Audience individuals vs organisations ? 7. Rationale 8. formal and informal Contexts Spaces Components Maturity Levels learning, working and social learning, technologies and their combination in ePortfolio and Open Badges NotYet Started, Aware, Committed, Established and Advanced Maturity Matrix 2 3 4 5 1 9. 2 Contexts 3 4 5 1 Maturity Matrix Organised Structured Learning Objectives Intentional Formal Informal Non- Formal 10. Spaces Maturity Matrix 2 3 4 5 1 LEARNING SPACE WORKING SPACE SOCIAL SPACE Formal Informal Policy, Arts, Culture, Sports, Healthcare, Leisure DIY Employee Artist Self-employed Professional Unemployed Employer ... Pupil Student Adult Learner with special needs Teacher Principal ... Citizen Parent Child Trade-unionist Consumer ... School College University Training Centre Evening Class Study Groups ... School Firm Social Enterprise Employment Agency Hospital Restaurant Shopping Centre Social Service Sport Centre ... Theatre Museum Restaurant Civic Centre Sport Centre ... 11. Recognition Learning Space Working Space Social Space FinancialFormal Informal Informal Formal Me 12. Components Maturity Matrix Learning Technologies ePortfolio Open Badges + 2 3 4 5 1 13. Maturity Levels Maturity Matrix 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 NotYet Started Aware Committed Established Advanced 14. Evaluation Report EPORTFOLIOS & OPEN BADGES MATURITY MATRIX THE EUROPORTFOLIO / EPNET PROJECT IS FUNDED WITH SUPPORT FROM THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION. LEARNINGINTHE21STCENTURY Evaluation Report EPORTFOLIOS & OPEN BADGES MATURITY MATRIX THE EUROPORTFOLIO / EPNET PROJECT IS FUNDED WITH SUPPORT FROM THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION. LEARNINGINTHE21STCENTURY 15. TABLE OF CONTENTS Learning 5 Assessment 7 People-Teaching Staff 9 People-Learners 10 Technologies 11 ePortfolios 13 ePortfolios Technologies 16 Open Badges 18 Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS Learning 5 Assessment 7 People-Teaching Staff 9 People-Learners 10 Technologies 11 ePortfolios 13 ePortfolios Technologies 16 Open Badges 18 Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 4 16. Learning Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced Curriculum design Some members of the teaching staff do not simply apply the curriculum, but also redesign some elements within their own discipline. The organisation encouraged all teachers to work with the learners and local community to interpret the curriculum in relation to the local context. The learners and the local community are actively involved in the design of the curriculum Staff member and educational learners are actively involved in their community of practice to share their experience in curriculum design. Outcome-based learning Outcome-based learning is used in a limited number of course, or used by a limited number of teachers. Outcome-based learning is encouraged and valued by the organisation Outcome-based learning is applied systematically across all disciplines Staff member are actively involved in their community of practice to the denition and review of the learning outcomes within and across disciplines. Reective learning and practice Reective learning and practice is restricted to individual limited to a set / courses Some organisational processes have been redesigned to require reective practice: reective practice is promoted by senior staff with inuence Reective practice is a normal part of the organisations processes for all staff Reective practice is integrated within a global community of practice (e.g. professional body) and contributes to global innovation and changes Community and peer learning Community and peer learning happens within a limited number of settings. Community and peer learning happens across disciplines and heterogeneous groups. All the skills, competencies and knowledge of learners and staff is discoverable by other members of the community / organisation to encourage peer learning Peer learning happens beyond institutional boundaries within cross--institutional networks of knowledge exchange. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 5 Learning Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced Curriculum design Some members of the teaching staff do not simply apply the curriculum, but also redesign some elements within their own discipline. The organisation encouraged all teachers to work with the learners and local community to interpret the curriculum in relation to the local context. The learners and the local community are actively involved in the design of the curriculum Staff member and educational learners are actively involved in their community of practice to share their experience in curriculum design. Outcome-based learning Outcome-based learning is used in a limited number of course, or used by a limited number of teachers. Outcome-based learning is encouraged and valued by the organisation Outcome-based learning is applied systematically across all disciplines Staff member are actively involved in their community of practice to the denition and review of the learning outcomes within and across disciplines. Reective learning and practice Reective learning and practice is restricted to individual limited to a set / courses Some organisational processes have been redesigned to require reective practice: reective practice is promoted by senior staff with inuence Reective practice is a normal part of the organisations processes for all staff Reective practice is integrated within a global community of practice (e.g. professional body) and contributes to global innovation and changes Community and peer learning Community and peer learning happens within a limited number of settings. Community and peer learning happens across disciplines and heterogeneous groups. All the skills, competencies and knowledge of learners and staff is discoverable by other members of the community / organisation to encourage peer learning Peer learning happens beyond institutional boundaries within cross--institutional networks of knowledge exchange. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 5 17. Assessment Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced Accreditation of prior experience and learning APEL is practiced but only by a small number of staff and/or discipline. There is a policy for accreditation of prior experience and learning for admissions and advanced standing The APEL policy is systematically reviewed and improved. it is supported by senior management and educational leaders. The lessons learned through the practice of APEL are shared with the larger community, beyond the institutional boundaries. Recording and reporting progress and achievement There is a pilot scheme in one or more areas to use electronic means to record individual progress and achievement Electronic means of recording individual progress and achievement are spreading across the organisation. Systematic participation and contribution of staff in the collection of evidence, review and reection processes is changing the organisational culture Individual progress and achievements are aggregated beyond the institution's boundaries to contribute to the improvement and/or transformation of the learning environment Providing Feedback Feedback on learners' performance is clear, constructive and timely, using a variety of sources to prompt reection and further action Clear, constructive and timely feedback is recorded and the effect measured (feedback loop). Teaching staff collaborate on a regular basis to provide holistic feedback, beyond the performance in individual disciplines. The art of providing clear, constructive and timely feedback is transmitted to the learners to contribute to the improvement of teaching and learning. Authentic assessment Some individual initiatives have developed forms of assessment rooted in performance in real-life settings beyond examination under controlled conditions Organisational structures and processes have been developed to accommodate and encourage assessment of performance in real- life settings. The organisation prioritises assessment evidence from real life performance, rarely and exceptionally using controlled assessments Assessment is treated as "learning about learning" and is deeply intertwined with the learning process which is itself based on authentic learning experiences. Self and Peer Assessment Self and peer-assessment are used by some teachers. Learners are encouraged to practice self and peer-assessment. The practice of self- and peer- assessment is integrated into learning practice and is celebrated as a competency in its own right. Teachers and learners are treated equally, i.e. learners assessment of teachers are regarded as 'peer- assessment' within the learning community Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 7 Assessment Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced Accreditation of prior experience and learning APEL is practiced but only by a small number of staff and/or discipline. There is a policy for accreditation of prior experience and learning for admissions and advanced standing The APEL policy is systematically reviewed and improved. it is supported by senior management and educational leaders. The lessons learned through the practice of APEL are shared with the larger community, beyond the institutional boundaries. Recording and reporting progress and achievement There is a pilot scheme in one or more areas to use electronic means to record individual progress and achievement Electronic means of recording individual progress and achievement are spreading across the organisation. Systematic participation and contribution of staff in the collection of evidence, review and reection processes is changing the organisational culture Individual progress and achievements are aggregated beyond the institution's boundaries to contribute to the improvement and/or transformation of the learning environment Providing Feedback Feedback on learners' performance is clear, constructive and timely, using a variety of sources to prompt reection and further action Clear, constructive and timely feedback is recorded and the effect measured (feedback loop). Teaching staff collaborate on a regular basis to provide holistic feedback, beyond the performance in individual disciplines. The art of providing clear, constructive and timely feedback is transmitted to the learners to contribute to the improvement of teaching and learning. Authentic assessment Some individual initiatives have developed forms of assessment rooted in performance in real-life settings beyond examination under controlled conditions Organisational structures and processes have been developed to accommodate and encourage assessment of performance in real- life settings. The organisation prioritises assessment evidence from real life performance, rarely and exceptionally using controlled assessments Assessment is treated as "learning about learning" and is deeply intertwined with the learning process which is itself based on authentic learning experiences. Self and Peer Assessment Self and peer-assessment are used by some teachers. Learners are encouraged to practice self and peer-assessment. The practice of self- and peer- assessment is integrated into learning practice and is celebrated as a competency in its own right. Teachers and learners are treated equally, i.e. learners assessment of teachers are regarded as 'peer- assessment' within the learning community Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 7 18. People-Teaching Staff Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced ICT skills A few staff are ICT familiar/ competent and the ICT coordinator or technician is ICT uent. Some staff are ICT familiar/ competent and the ICT coordinator or technician is ICT uent. The majority of staff are ICT familiar/competent with key staff ICT uent, including teaching assistants. The majority of staff are ICT uent. Techno-literacy The level of techno-literacy of staff in general is limited to the use of pre-congured systems and institutionally-provided software Some individuals have the level of techno-literacy needed to allow them to make informed choices related to their specic needs A signicant number of individuals have the level of techno-literacy needed to allow them to choose and congure learning technologies to meet their needs There are sufcient people in appropriate positions with the level of techno-literacy required to design an integrated system approach incorporating ePortfolios, working with the other elements of the organisation's information system Digital content creation Some teachers create digital content to support learning e.g. lesson plans, learning module, etc. Teachers are regular and active creators / remixers of digital content. Teachers are regular and active creators of discipline specic as well as cross-curricular digital content. Teachers work collaboratively with teachers beyond institutional borders for the creation/remix of learning resources and for seeking peers feedback. Continuing professional Development There is a pilot scheme in one or more areas to use electronic means to plan learning and development in line with the need for competencies within the organisation. There is a central system to plan learning and development in line with the need for competencies within the organisation. The system is mainly used by the management. Empowerment of staff is limited. Evidence of learning and development, competency development planning and activities are systematically recorded, shared and reected upon by fully empowered individuals, staff and management to anticipate the needs for future development. Competency development data is benchmarked / aggregated with external stakeholders at the local, regional and/or branch level to anticipate the need for competency development and the interaction with education and training providers as well as public authorities. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 9 People-Teaching Staff Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced ICT skills A few staff are ICT familiar/ competent and the ICT coordinator or technician is ICT uent. Some staff are ICT familiar/ competent and the ICT coordinator or technician is ICT uent. The majority of staff are ICT familiar/competent with key staff ICT uent, including teaching assistants. The majority of staff are ICT uent. Techno-literacy The level of techno-literacy of staff in general is limited to the use of pre-congured systems and institutionally-provided software Some individuals have the level of techno-literacy needed to allow them to make informed choices related to their specic needs A signicant number of individuals have the level of techno-literacy needed to allow them to choose and congure learning technologies to meet their needs There are sufcient people in appropriate positions with the level of techno-literacy required to design an integrated system approach incorporating ePortfolios, working with the other elements of the organisation's information system Digital content creation Some teachers create digital content to support learning e.g. lesson plans, learning module, etc. Teachers are regular and active creators / remixers of digital content. Teachers are regular and active creators of discipline specic as well as cross-curricular digital content. Teachers work collaboratively with teachers beyond institutional borders for the creation/remix of learning resources and for seeking peers feedback. Continuing professional Development There is a pilot scheme in one or more areas to use electronic means to plan learning and development in line with the need for competencies within the organisation. There is a central system to plan learning and development in line with the need for competencies within the organisation. The system is mainly used by the management. Empowerment of staff is limited. Evidence of learning and development, competency development planning and activities are systematically recorded, shared and reected upon by fully empowered individuals, staff and management to anticipate the needs for future development. Competency development data is benchmarked / aggregated with external stakeholders at the local, regional and/or branch level to anticipate the need for competency development and the interaction with education and training providers as well as public authorities. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 9 19. People-Learners Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced ICT skills Most leaners have basic ICT skills. The institution encourages the emergence of learners as ICT leaders to take an active role in the implementation of ICT. The learners that have been identied as ICT leaders and are actively contributing to the learning and ICT strategy of the institution. A number of learners are contributing beyond institutional borders to support and implement ICT for learning. Techno-literacy The level of techno-literacy of learners in general is limited to the use of pre-congured systems and institutionally-provided software Some individual learners have the level of techno-literacy to contribute actively to the design and implementation of an ICT strategy. The development of techno-literacy is systematically encouraged and used to contribute to the design of the learning environment. Learners are mainly in charge of the implementation and management of their ICT for learning environment. Digital content creation Learners create some digital content in formal curriculum areas. Learners are regular and active creators of digital content in formal curriculum areas. Learners are regular and active creators of digital content in both formal and informal curriculum areas. Learners are regular and active creators of content in both formal and informal curriculum areas, and make connections between their virtual spaces and multiple identities to support learning. Seeking and providing feedback Learners are occasionally invited to seek and provide feedback. Learners are encouraged to actively seek and provide feedback in both formal and informal curriculum areas. Learners are regular seekers and providers of feedback involving a range of audiences, in both formal and informal curriculum areas. The competencies involved in the provision of feedback is recognised and celebrated by the institution. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 10 People-Learners Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced ICT skills Most leaners have basic ICT skills. The institution encourages the emergence of learners as ICT leaders to take an active role in the implementation of ICT. The learners that have been identied as ICT leaders and are actively contributing to the learning and ICT strategy of the institution. A number of learners are contributing beyond institutional borders to support and implement ICT for learning. Techno-literacy The level of techno-literacy of learners in general is limited to the use of pre-congured systems and institutionally-provided software Some individual learners have the level of techno-literacy to contribute actively to the design and implementation of an ICT strategy. The development of techno-literacy is systematically encouraged and used to contribute to the design of the learning environment. Learners are mainly in charge of the implementation and management of their ICT for learning environment. Digital content creation Learners create some digital content in formal curriculum areas. Learners are regular and active creators of digital content in formal curriculum areas. Learners are regular and active creators of digital content in both formal and informal curriculum areas. Learners are regular and active creators of content in both formal and informal curriculum areas, and make connections between their virtual spaces and multiple identities to support learning. Seeking and providing feedback Learners are occasionally invited to seek and provide feedback. Learners are encouraged to actively seek and provide feedback in both formal and informal curriculum areas. Learners are regular seekers and providers of feedback involving a range of audiences, in both formal and informal curriculum areas. The competencies involved in the provision of feedback is recognised and celebrated by the institution. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 10 20. Technologies Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced ICT Policy The lack of ICT policy has been identied as an obstacle to the efciency of the investments in ICT for learning. The organisation is committed to the design and implementation of an ICT policy developed through consultation of all stakeholders across the institution. The ICT policy is regularly monitored, reviewed and evaluated in the context of the organisation's other policies, in line with the organisation's vision and goals and involving all stakeholders. The organisation has a well- established, successful and rigorous framework for monitoring and reviewing all its strategies and policies, and the monitoring and reviewing of ICT within this framework and takes into account local, regional, sectoral and national priorities. Privacy policy Privacy is dealt on an ad-hoc basis by individual teachers. The organisation is committed to protect privacy through establishing policies and implementing privacy technology e.g. privacy by design. The institution's privacy is fully integrated in the ICT policy. The technical infrastructure is fully compliant with regulations and best practices regarding privacy. The organisation is part of a trust infrastructure, a federation facilitating the exchange of personal data under the control of the individuals. Innovation ICT is mainly used to support previously established practice e.g. use an interactive white board to deliver lectures or the Internet to deliver distance courses. ICT is used in a number of pilot projects to challenge and transform current teaching and learning practices. The use of ICT is primarily sought for allowing practices that would not have been possible without it e.g. learning analytics. Organisation's leaders are actively involved and recognised in innovation networks, beyond the institutional boundaries. Internal connectivity There are few computers and they are located in dedicated rooms. All learners have access to a computer or tablet when they need it, including a connection to the Internet. All learners have a computer or a tablet to access the intranet and the Internet at anytime within the institution. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 11 Technologies Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced ICT Policy The lack of ICT policy has been identied as an obstacle to the efciency of the investments in ICT for learning. The organisation is committed to the design and implementation of an ICT policy developed through consultation of all stakeholders across the institution. The ICT policy is regularly monitored, reviewed and evaluated in the context of the organisation's other policies, in line with the organisation's vision and goals and involving all stakeholders. The organisation has a well- established, successful and rigorous framework for monitoring and reviewing all its strategies and policies, and the monitoring and reviewing of ICT within this framework and takes into account local, regional, sectoral and national priorities. Privacy policy Privacy is dealt on an ad-hoc basis by individual teachers. The organisation is committed to protect privacy through establishing policies and implementing privacy technology e.g. privacy by design. The institution's privacy is fully integrated in the ICT policy. The technical infrastructure is fully compliant with regulations and best practices regarding privacy. The organisation is part of a trust infrastructure, a federation facilitating the exchange of personal data under the control of the individuals. Innovation ICT is mainly used to support previously established practice e.g. use an interactive white board to deliver lectures or the Internet to deliver distance courses. ICT is used in a number of pilot projects to challenge and transform current teaching and learning practices. The use of ICT is primarily sought for allowing practices that would not have been possible without it e.g. learning analytics. Organisation's leaders are actively involved and recognised in innovation networks, beyond the institutional boundaries. Internal connectivity There are few computers and they are located in dedicated rooms. All learners have access to a computer or tablet when they need it, including a connection to the Internet. All learners have a computer or a tablet to access the intranet and the Internet at anytime within the institution. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 11 21. ePortfolios Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced Motivation / Ownership The motivation for learners to create ePortfolios is mainly extrinsic, e.g. a requirement from the institution. The institution is committed to ensuring individual ownership of ePortfolios and learners are actively involved in the decision process. Learners are intrinsically motivated and have full ownership of their ePortfolios. This is demonstrated by the continuation of individual ePortfolios beyond the time of study within the institution. Portfolios are a central tool for building institutional and personal constructions of individuals activity, achievements, life and identity. Content Learners have little choice over the content of the ePortfolio, which is prescribed by the institution. The institution is committed to let learners choose and control the content of their individual ePortfolios and keep separate individual ePortfolios and institutional ePortfolios. Learners have full control over the content of their ePortfolios, while the institution has full control over the content of the information learners need to provide for monitoring the learning process. The information collected for / provided to the institutional ePortfolios is seamlessly collected from the content of the individual ePortfolios. Access Access to ePortfolios is fully under institution control and supervision. Learners do not have the choice of the tool for managing their ePortfolios. The institution is committed to letting learners use the tools of their choice for managing their ePortfolios. The institutional policy for individual ePortfolios is inspired from BYOD (bring your own device). Leadership Leaders/champions of ePortfolio practice haveemerged but are not yet recognised by the institution. Senior staff and educational leaders are committed to establishing a shared vision of ePortfolio practice and how it relates to the organisation's overall mission. Senior staff and educational leaders can articulate a clear vision of how ePortfolio practice will develop and might transform learning and the curriculum. Senior staff and educational leaders contribute to the overall ePortfolio vision and strategy at local, regional and national levels. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 13 ePortfolios Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced Motivation / Ownership The motivation for learners to create ePortfolios is mainly extrinsic, e.g. a requirement from the institution. The institution is committed to ensuring individual ownership of ePortfolios and learners are actively involved in the decision process. Learners are intrinsically motivated and have full ownership of their ePortfolios. This is demonstrated by the continuation of individual ePortfolios beyond the time of study within the institution. Portfolios are a central tool for building institutional and personal constructions of individuals activity, achievements, life and identity. Content Learners have little choice over the content of the ePortfolio, which is prescribed by the institution. The institution is committed to let learners choose and control the content of their individual ePortfolios and keep separate individual ePortfolios and institutional ePortfolios. Learners have full control over the content of their ePortfolios, while the institution has full control over the content of the information learners need to provide for monitoring the learning process. The information collected for / provided to the institutional ePortfolios is seamlessly collected from the content of the individual ePortfolios. Access Access to ePortfolios is fully under institution control and supervision. Learners do not have the choice of the tool for managing their ePortfolios. The institution is committed to letting learners use the tools of their choice for managing their ePortfolios. The institutional policy for individual ePortfolios is inspired from BYOD (bring your own device). Leadership Leaders/champions of ePortfolio practice haveemerged but are not yet recognised by the institution. Senior staff and educational leaders are committed to establishing a shared vision of ePortfolio practice and how it relates to the organisation's overall mission. Senior staff and educational leaders can articulate a clear vision of how ePortfolio practice will develop and might transform learning and the curriculum. Senior staff and educational leaders contribute to the overall ePortfolio vision and strategy at local, regional and national levels. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 13 22. ePortfolios Technologies Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced Usability The interface of the tools used to support ePortfolios processes are reasonably well designed and easy to use. Tools are documented with tutorials and online help. There is a consistent interface between the different tools used to create and exploit ePortfolios (e.g. between a LMS and an ePMS). The lessons learned from using tools is used to feed-back the design, selection and integration of the tools used to support ePortfolio processes. Integration Technologies to support ePortfolio practice are fragmented across multiple tools and are not connected to the current information system architecture There are clear plans to integrate ePortfolios within the institutional information system to allow seamless ow of information from/ to ePortfolios. ePortfolios are fully integrated in the information system. The centre of gravity of the information system has moved from the institution to the individual. The ICT infrastructure is person / identity centric and extends beyond organisational boundaries -e.g. clients, suppliers, professional bodies, regulatory and awarding bodies. Management Individual ePortfolio infrastructure is managed by the institution for the learners. There is no clear distinction between individual and institutional ePortfolios Individual ePortfolio infrastructure is managed by the institution with the learners. Individual ePortfolio infrastructure is fully managed by the learners. Individual / institutional ePortfolios revise There is an ePortfolio Management System (ePMS) but it is not integrated in the information system. Personal ePortfolios must be created within the ePMS. The organisation is committed to let learners choose their own tools to manage their personal ePortfolios. The ePMS is used to support organisational processes such as assessment, accreditation, etc. using data from individual ePortfolios. The ePMS leaves learners free to choose their own environment for their personal ePortfolio BYOD (bring your own device) applied to ePortfolios. The interaction between individual ePortfolios and the ePMS is seamless. The ePMS interacts seamlessly with external information systems and learners can bring their own ePortfolios across multiple learning environments and institutions Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 16 ePortfolios Technologies Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced Usability The interface of the tools used to support ePortfolios processes are reasonably well designed and easy to use. Tools are documented with tutorials and online help. There is a consistent interface between the different tools used to create and exploit ePortfolios (e.g. between a LMS and an ePMS). The lessons learned from using tools is used to feed-back the design, selection and integration of the tools used to support ePortfolio processes. Integration Technologies to support ePortfolio practice are fragmented across multiple tools and are not connected to the current information system architecture There are clear plans to integrate ePortfolios within the institutional information system to allow seamless ow of information from/ to ePortfolios. ePortfolios are fully integrated in the information system. The centre of gravity of the information system has moved from the institution to the individual. The ICT infrastructure is person / identity centric and extends beyond organisational boundaries -e.g. clients, suppliers, professional bodies, regulatory and awarding bodies. Management Individual ePortfolio infrastructure is managed by the institution for the learners. There is no clear distinction between individual and institutional ePortfolios Individual ePortfolio infrastructure is managed by the institution with the learners. Individual ePortfolio infrastructure is fully managed by the learners. Individual / institutional ePortfolios revise There is an ePortfolio Management System (ePMS) but it is not integrated in the information system. Personal ePortfolios must be created within the ePMS. The organisation is committed to let learners choose their own tools to manage their personal ePortfolios. The ePMS is used to support organisational processes such as assessment, accreditation, etc. using data from individual ePortfolios. The ePMS leaves learners free to choose their own environment for their personal ePortfolio BYOD (bring your own device) applied to ePortfolios. The interaction between individual ePortfolios and the ePMS is seamless. The ePMS interacts seamlessly with external information systems and learners can bring their own ePortfolios across multiple learning environments and institutions Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 16 23. Open Badges Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced Motivation / Ownership The motivation to earn Open Badges is mainly extrinsic, e.g. to get a grade or a reward mainly designed for the learners and awarded by the institution or a person of authority within the institution. Learners are actively encouraged to co-design the Open Badges eco- system, including through the design and delivery of their own Badges. All stakeholders are actively involved in the co-design of the Open Badges institutional eco- system. All stakeholders are actively involved in the co-design of the Open Badges eco-system, beyond the institutional boundaries. Adoption Open Badges practice is limited to a small number of innovators. A signicant number/critical mass of staff/learners are developing Open Badges practice across the curriculum. Open Badges are embedded in the institution with the support of senior leadership and advocacy. Learners and staff engagement almost universally positive; Open Badges used as a central tool for building both institutional and personal constructions of individuals activity, achievements, life and identity. Leadership Leaders/champions of Open Badges practice haveemerged but are not yet recognised by the institution. Senior staff and educational leaders are committed to establishing a shared vision of Open Badges practice and how it relates to the organisation's overall mission. Senior staff and educational leaders can articulate a clear vision of how Open Badges practice will develop and might transform learning and the curriculum. Senior staff and educational leaders contribute to the overall Open Badges vision and strategy at local, regional and national levels. Policy The lack of an Open Badges policy has been identied as an obstacle to the development of practices associated to Open Badges. Theinstitution has a clearly articulated an Open Badges policy regarding the different stakeholder groups, including staff. Data collected from Open Badges is used as prime source to inform the organisation's policy. Open Badges data is used as prime source of information to inform policies at local/regional/ national levels e.g. mapping the competencies of a territory. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 18 Open Badges Not Yet Aware Committed Established Advanced Motivation / Ownership The motivation to earn Open Badges is mainly extrinsic, e.g. to get a grade or a reward mainly designed for the learners and awarded by the institution or a person of authority within the institution. Learners are actively encouraged to co-design the Open Badges eco- system, including through the design and delivery of their own Badges. All stakeholders are actively involved in the co-design of the Open Badges institutional eco- system. All stakeholders are actively involved in the co-design of the Open Badges eco-system, beyond the institutional boundaries. Adoption Open Badges practice is limited to a small number of innovators. A signicant number/critical mass of staff/learners are developing Open Badges practice across the curriculum. Open Badges are embedded in the institution with the support of senior leadership and advocacy. Learners and staff engagement almost universally positive; Open Badges used as a central tool for building both institutional and personal constructions of individuals activity, achievements, life and identity. Leadership Leaders/champions of Open Badges practice haveemerged but are not yet recognised by the institution. Senior staff and educational leaders are committed to establishing a shared vision of Open Badges practice and how it relates to the organisation's overall mission. Senior staff and educational leaders can articulate a clear vision of how Open Badges practice will develop and might transform learning and the curriculum. Senior staff and educational leaders contribute to the overall Open Badges vision and strategy at local, regional and national levels. Policy The lack of an Open Badges policy has been identied as an obstacle to the development of practices associated to Open Badges. Theinstitution has a clearly articulated an Open Badges policy regarding the different stakeholder groups, including staff. Data collected from Open Badges is used as prime source to inform the organisation's policy. Open Badges data is used as prime source of information to inform policies at local/regional/ national levels e.g. mapping the competencies of a territory. Europortfolio Maturity Matrix page 18 24. ?http://courses.foi.hr:9001/p/Maturity_Matrix What's next? Action planning 25. Serge Ravet EUROPORTFOLIO ADPIOS, EUROPORTFOLIO @Szerge, learningfutures.eu epforum.eu, europortfolio.org, iosf.org Join the Europortfolio community! www.europortfolio.org The EUROPORTFOLIO / EPNET project is funded with support from the European Commission. Merci! Evaluation Report EPORTFOLIOS & OPEN BADGES MATURITY MATRIX THE EUROPORTFOLIO / EPNET PROJECT IS FUNDED WITH SUPPORT FROM THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION. LEARNINGINTHE21STCENTURY