VTCT Level 3 Diploma in Food and Beverage Service Supervision of... · Supervise food and beverage…

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  • AT30378F_v5

    VTCT Level 3 Diploma in Food and Beverage Service SupervisionOperational start date: 1 April 2012Credit value: 42Total Qualification Time (TQT): 420Guided learning hours (GLH): 347 - 355Qualification number: 600/4806/2

    Statement of unit achievementBy signing this statement of unit achievement you are confirming that all learning outcomes, assessment criteria and range statements (if/where applicable) have been achieved under specified conditions, and that the evidence gathered is authentic.

    This statement of unit achievement table must be completed prior to claiming certification.

    Unit code Date achieved Learner signatureAssessor initials

    IQA signature (if sampled)

    Mandatory units

    UV31180

    UV31161

    UV31188

    UV31195

    UV31202

    UV31173

    Optional units

  • 222

    The qualification

    Introduction National Occupational Standards (NOS)

    The VTCT Level 3 Diploma in Food and Beverage Service Supervision is a preparation for work qualification that can be assessed in a workplace or realistic working environment (RWE).

    This qualification will develop your knowledge and understanding of food and beverage services. You will learn about the principles of food safety supervision, promoting food and beverage services and products and supervising customer service performance in hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism. You will also learn about the legislation in food and beverage service.

    The optional units that make up this qualification will allow you to tailor your learning to your personal interests and preferences. Optional units range from preparing and serving a variety of food and beverages, to barista skills and legal and social responsibilities of a personal licence holder.

    2

    This qualification has been mapped to the relevant NOS, and is regulated on the Regulated Qualifications Framework.

    This qualification is approved and supported by People 1st, the sector skills council for hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism.

    Prerequisites

    There are no formal prerequisite qualifications that you must have prior to undertaking this qualification.

    Your centre will have ensured that you have the required knowledge, understanding and skills to enrol and successfully achieve this qualification.

  • 3333

    Progression

    On completion of this qualification you may choose to undertake further study; qualifications you could progress to include: VTCT Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Hospitality

    Supervision and Leadership

    Alternatively, you may wish to seek employment as: Shift/team leader Head of waiting staff Assistant bar/restaurant manager

  • 4

    Qualification structure

    Mandatory units - 23 creditsVTCT unit code

    Ofqual unit reference Unit title

    Credit value GLH Level

    UV31180 K/502/0388 The principles of food safety supervision for catering 3 25 3

    UV31161 A/503/1735 Legislation in food and beverage service 2 18 3

    UV31188 L/600/1066Principles of supervising customer service performance in hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism

    2 20 3

    UV31195 R/503/1725 Principles of supervising food and beverage services 5 35 3

    UV31202 Y/503/1726 Principles of promoting food and beverage services and products 6 45 3

    UV31173 H/503/1728 Supervise food and beverage service 5 44 3

    Optional units - 19 (minimum) creditsVTCT unit code

    Ofqual unit reference Unit title

    Credit value GLH Level

    UV31187 L/503/1724 Carve, fillet, joint and serve food in a food service area 5 44 3

    UV31166 D/503/1730 Prepare and serve alcoholic and cold non-alcoholic beverages 4 36 3

    UV31200 T/503/1734 Prepare and serve cocktails 5 41 3

    UV31183 K/503/1729 Prepare and serve wines 4 35 3

    UV31184 K/503/1732 Prepare, cook and serve food in a food service area 5 44 3

    UV31174 H/503/1731 Provide advice to customers on food and beverage matching 4 32 3

    UV31192 M/503/1733 Supervise hospitality events 5 44 3

    UV21114 J/600/8243 Barista skills 2 20 2

    UV21105 H/601/7631 Legal and social responsibilities of a personal licence holder 1 8 2

    Total credits required - 42 (minimum)

    4

    All mandatory units must be completed. A minimum of 39 credits must be at or above Level 3.

  • 5

    Guidance on assessment

    External assessment (any requirements will be shown in the unit)

    Externally assessed question papers completed electronically will be set and marked by VTCT.

    Externally assessed hard-copy question papers will be set by VTCT, marked by centre staff and sampled by VTCT external quality assurers.

    This book contains the mandatory units that make up this qualification. Optional units will be provided in additional booklets (if applicable). Where indicated, VTCT will provide assessment materials. Assessments may be internal or external. The method of assessment is indicated in each unit.

    Internal assessment (any requirements will be shown in the unit)

    Assessment is set, marked and internally quality assured by the centre to clearly demonstrate achievement of the learning outcomes. Assessment is sampled by VTCT external quality assurers.

    Assessment explained

    5

    VTCT qualifications are assessed and quality assured by centre staff. Work will be set to improve your practical skills, knowledge and understanding. For practical elements, you will be observed by your assessor. All your work must be collected in a portfolio of evidence and cross-referenced to requirements listed in this record of assessment book.

    Your centre will have an internal quality assurer whose role is to check that your assessment and evidence is valid and reliable and meets VTCT and regulatory requirements.

    An external quality assurer, appointed by VTCT, will visit your centre to sample and quality-check assessments, the internal quality assurance process and the evidence gathered. You may be asked to attend on a different day from usual if requested by the external quality assurer.

    This record of assessment book is your property and must be in your possession when you are being assessed or quality assured. It must be kept safe. In some cases your centre will be required to keep it in a secure place. You and your course assessor will together complete this book to show achievement of all learning outcomes, assessment criteria and ranges.

  • 6

    Creating a portfolio of evidence

    As part of this qualification you are required to produce a portfolio of evidence. A portfolio will confirm the knowledge, understanding and skills that you have learnt. It may be in electronic or paper format.

    Your assessor will provide guidance on how to prepare the portfolio of evidence and how to show practical achievement and understanding of the knowledge required to successfully complete this qualification. It is this booklet along with the portfolio of evidence that will serve as the prime source of evidence for this qualification.

    Evidence in the portfolio may take the following forms:

    Observed work Witness statements Audio-visual media Evidence of prior learning or attainment Written questions Oral questions Assignments Case studies

    All evidence should be documented in the portfolio and cross-referenced to unit outcomes. Constructing the portfolio of evidence should not be left to the end of the course.

    6

  • 7

    Unit assessment methods

    This section provides an overview of the assessment methods that make up each unit in this qualification. Detailed information on assessment is provided in each unit.

    Mandatory units External Internal

    VTCT unit code Unit title

    Question paper(s) Observation(s)

    Portfolio of Evidence

    UV31180 The principles of food safety supervision for catering 0

    UV31161 Legislation in food and beverage service 0

    UV31188Principles of supervising customer service performance in hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism

    0

    UV31195 Principles of supervising food and beverage services 0

    UV31202 Principles of promoting food and beverage services and products 0

    UV31173 Supervise food and beverage service 0

    Optional units External Internal

    VTCT unit code Unit title

    Question paper(s) Observation(s)

    Portfolio of Evidence

    UV31187 Carve, fillet, joint and serve food in a food service area 0

    UV31166 Prepare and serve alcoholic and cold non-alcoholic beverages 0

    UV31200 Prepare and serve cocktails 0 UV31183 Prepare and serve wines 0

    UV31184 Prepare, cook and serve food in a food service area 0

    UV31174 Provide advice to customers on food and beverage matching 0

    UV31192 Supervise hospitality events 0 UV21114 Barista skills 0

    UV21105 Legal and social responsibilities of a personal licence holder 0

    7

  • Unit glossary

    8

    Description

    VTCT product code

    All units are allocated a unique VTCT product code for identification purposes. This code should be quoted in all queries and correspondence to VTCT.

    Unit title The title clearly indicates the focus of the unit.

    National Occupational Standards (NOS)

    NOS describe the skills, knowledge and understanding needed to undertake a particular task or job to a nationally recognised level of competence.

    LevelLevel is an indication of the demand of the learning experience; the depth and/or complexity of achievement and independence in achieving the learning outcomes.

    Credit valueThis is the number of credits awarded upon successful achievement of all unit outcomes. Credit is a numerical value that represents a means of recognising, measuring, valuing and comparing achievement.

    Guiding Learning hours (GLH)

    The activity of a learner in being taught or instructed by - or otherwise participating in education or training under the immediate guidance or supervision of - a lecturer, supervisor, tutor or other appropriate provider of education or training.

    Total qualification time (TQT)

    The number of hours an awarding organisation has assigned to a qualification for Guided Learning and an estimate of the number of hours a learner will reasonably be likely to spend in preparation, study, or any other form of participation in education or training. This includes assessment, which takes place as directed - but, unilke Guided Learning, not under the immediate guidance or supervision of - a lecturer, supervisor, tutor or other appropriate provider of education or training.

    Observations This indicates the minimum number of competent observations, per outcome, required to achieve the unit.

    Learning outcomes

    The learning outcomes are the most important component of the unit; they set out what is expected in terms of knowing, understanding and practical ability as a result of the learning process. Learning outcomes are the results of learning.

    Evidence requirements This section provides guidelines on how evidence must be gathered.

    Observation outcome

    An observation outcome details the tasks that must be practically demonstrated to achieve the unit.

    Knowledge outcome

    A knowledge outcome details the theoretical requirements of a unit that must be evidenced through oral questioning, a mandatory written question paper, a portfolio of evidence or other forms of evidence.

    Assessment criteria

    Assessment criteria set out what is required, in terms of achievement, to meet a learning outcome. The assessment criteria and learning outcomes are the components that inform the learning and assessment that should take place. Assessment criteria define the standard expected to meet learning outcomes.

    Range The range indicates what must be covered. Ranges must be practically demonstrated in parallel with the units observation outcomes.

  • UV31180The principles of food safety supervision for catering

    The aim of this unit is to develop your knowledge and understanding of the importance of kitchen organisation and food safety. You will investigate methods to prevent hazards, systems to maintain standards, and monitoring procedures to ensure a consistent approach. You will look at the role of different levels of staff in the implementation and management of food and kitchen safety, and how the organisation must work together to ensure a safe environment is achieved.

    UV31180_v5

  • Observation(s)

    GLH

    Credit value

    Level

    External paper(s)

    0

    25

    3

    3

    0

  • On completion of this unit you will:

    Learning outcomes Evidence requirements

    UV31180

    1. Understand the role of the supervisor in ensuring compliance with food safety legislation

    2. Understand the application and monitoring of good hygiene practice

    3. Understand how to implement food safety management procedures

    4. Understand the role of the supervisor in staff training

    1. Knowledge outcomes There must be evidence that you possess all the knowledge and understanding listed in the Knowledge section of this unit. In most cases this can be done by professional discussion and/or oral questioning. Other methods, such as projects, assignments and/or reflective accounts may also be used.

    2. Tutor/Assessor guidance You will be guided by your tutor/assessor on how to achieve learning outcomes in this unit. All outcomes must be achieved.

    3. External paper There is no external paper requirement for this unit.

    11

    The principles of food safety supervision for catering

  • Achieving knowledge outcomes

    Developing knowledge

    You will be guided by your tutor and assessor on the evidence that needs to be produced. Your knowledge and understanding will be assessed using the assessment methods listed below*:

    Projects Observed work Witness statements Audio-visual media Evidence of prior learning or attainment Written questions Oral questions Assignments Case studies Professional discussion

    Where applicable your assessor will integrate knowledge outcomes into practical observations through professional discussion and/or oral questioning.

    When a criterion has been orally questioned and achieved, your assessor will record this evidence in written form or by other appropriate means. There is no need for you to produce additional evidence as this criterion has already been achieved.

    Some knowledge and understanding outcomes may require you to show that you know and understand how to do something. If you have practical evidence from your own work that meets knowledge criteria, then there is no requirement for you to be questioned again on the same topic.

    *This is not an exhaustive list.

    UV3118012

  • Knowledge

    UV31180 13

    Learning outcome 1

    Understand the role of the supervisor in ensuring compliance with food safety legislation

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Summarise the importance of food safety management procedures

    b. Explain the responsibilities of employers and employees in respect of food safety legislation and procedures for compliance

    c. Outline how the legislation is enforced

  • UV3118014

    Learning outcome 2

    Understand the application and monitoring of good hygiene practice

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Explain the importance of, and methods for, temperature control

    b. Explain procedures to control contamination and cross-contamination

    c. Justify the importance of high standards of personal hygiene

    d. Explain procedures for cleaning, disinfection and waste disposal

    e. Outline requirements relating to the design of food premises and equipment

    f. Describe the importance of, and methods for, pest control

  • UV31180 15

    Learning outcome 3

    Understand how to implement food safety management procedures

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Describe the importance to food safety management of microbial, chemical, physical and allergenic hazards

    b. Describe methods and procedures for controlling food safety that include critical control points, critical limits and corrective actions

    c. Explain the requirements for monitoring and recording food safety procedures

    d. Describe methods for, and the importance of, evaluating food safety controls and procedures

  • UV3118016

    Learning outcome 4

    Understand the role of the supervisor in staff training

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Explain the requirements for induction and ongoing training of staff

    b. Explain the importance of effective communication of food safety procedures

  • Outcome 1: Understand the role of the supervisor in ensuring compliance with food safety legislation

    Unit content

    This section provides guidance on the recommended knowledge and skills required to enable you to achieve each of the learning outcomes in this unit. Your tutor/assessor will ensure you have the opportunity to cover all of the unit content.

    UV31180 17

    Food safety management procedures: Current health and safety legislation, current food safety legislation, current initiatives (Food Standards Agency - Safer food, better business (SFBB), hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP)), monitoring and evaluating procedures, pest control, fully trained staff, correct organisational procedures (waste disposal, equipment and premises maintenance, cleaning), up-to-date risk assessments.

    Importance of food safety management procedures: Legal requirements (personal, business), duty of care, customer satisfaction, safety of customers and staff, prevent illness, prevent cross-contamination.

    Responsibilities of employers and employees: Compliance with current legislation, compliance with organisations procedures and policies, staff training, supply of suitable resources (personal protective equipment (PPE), correct equipment), correct use of resources (equipment, PPE), allocation of food safety responsibilities, awareness, use of codes of practice, reporting procedures (hazards, non-compliance, illness).

    Procedures for compliance: Record keeping (sickness records, supplier and delivery records, reporting of injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences (RIDDOR), HR records (training, reporting procedures, staff appraisal), following sell-by dates, compliance with legislation (trade

    descriptions legislation and description of food items, food safety and storage of food item, licensing laws, selling alcohol and alcohol measures).

    Enforcing legislation: Current legislation, current regulations, current EU directives, monitoring visits from authorised specialist bodies (local authority trading standards, food and food safety inspectors from the local authoritys environmental health team), civil and criminal courts, appropriate organisational procedures and policies, employer and employee training.

  • Outcome 2: Understand the application and monitoring of good hygiene practice

    UV3118018

    Methods for temperature control: Fridges, chillers, display cabinets, freezers, blast chillers, hot serving cabinets.

    Importance of temperature control: Comply with current legislation (environmental health officer (EHO) requirements), prevent cross-contamination, minimise bacterial growth, minimise risk of food poisoning, minimise waste, maintain correct storage temperature.

    Control contamination and cross-contamination: Records of temperature monitoring, regular cleaning procedures (daily, weekly, monthly, periodically), comply with current legislation (control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH), RIDDOR, health and safety), PPE, correct uniform, good personal hygiene, correctly clean and sanitised equipment, correct use of cleaning materials, carry out regular maintenance, use of correct colour-coded boards, proper use of equipment, correct disposal of all types of waste, updated training.

    High standards of personal hygiene: Clean and ironed uniform, no or minimal jewellery, no or minimal make-up, no strong fragrance, appropriate length nails, suitable and clean footwear, use of gloves, hair nets if appropriate, hair tied back if appropriate, PPE, wash hands after toilet breaks, wash hands between tasks, report all illness to supervisor (diarrhoea, vomiting, colds, sore throats, skin infections, stomach upsets), cover cuts and grazes with appropriate dressings.

    Importance of personal hygiene: Comply with current legislation, prevent cross-contamination, minimise spread of bacteria, personal protection, protect customers

    and colleagues, consequences of non-compliance (fines, imprisonment, illness, accidents), minimise spoilage and waste.

    Procedures for cleaning, disinfection and waste disposal: Follow organisational procedures, clean as you go, follow cleaning stages (pre-clean, main clean, rinse, disinfect, rinse, dry), use of appropriate cleaning materials for task, correct use of chemicals and cleaning materials (dilution, mixing), all bottles labelled with content, use-by dates, regular cleaning (daily, weekly, monthly, periodically), electrical equipment unplugged, follow manufacturers instructions, storage of chemicals (COSHH), correct disposal of waste (food, chemical, disinfectants, use of bins, recycling, oil and grease), double sink for washing up, water temperature.

    Design of food premises: Comply with all current legislation (planning, health and safety, COSHH, environmental health), workflow, lighting, waste areas, ventilation, washing facilities, non-slip flooring, suitable material for wall coverings, suitable work surface, materials for ceiling, fire exits, doors (access to stores, dining room, staff facilities), layout of equipment (gas outlets, water and draining, electrical sockets), consider cleaning needs of work areas, layout of work stations, position of the pass/food service area.

    Design of equipment: Ease of use, ease of cleaning, ease of reassembly, fit for purpose (commercial use, appropriate for expected task).

    Types of pests: Cockroaches, rodents, insects, urban wildlife (foxes, badgers, wild cats, birds), domestic pets, product

  • Outcome 2: Understand the application and monitoring of good hygiene practice (continued)

    UV31180 19

    pests (flour mites, grain beetles, cigarette beetles), flies (fruit, blowfly).

    Methods for pest control: Organisational procedures, compliance with cleaning and maintenance procedures, appropriate response to pest problem (traps, poisons, rodenticides, pesticides), electronic fly killers.

    Importance of pest control: Avoid cross-contamination, minimise risk of spread of disease, minimise food waste, impact on Food Standards Agency hygiene rating, loss of reputation, loss of customers, decrease in sales, loss of profit.

    Outcome 3: Understand how to implement food safety management procedures

    Microbial hazards: Salmonella, campylobacter, e. coli, e. coli VTEC 0157 vegetative reproduction, bacterial growth line.

    Chemical hazards: Cleaning chemicals, veterinary residue, farming chemicals.

    Physical hazards: Broken equipment, packaging material, plants, string, pests and insects.

    Allergenic hazards: Nuts, dairy products, shellfish, yeast, gluten.

    Importance to food safety management of these hazards: Awareness of hazards, training, avoidance, written procedures and policies, food sourcing, checking food on delivery, respond to customer needs.

    Methods and procedures for controlling food safety: Maintain correct temperatures (while preparing, storing, transporting, holding for service), ensure food is fully and correctly defrosted before use, correct food preparation procedures (equipment, cooking times, cooking methods), cleaning procedures followed, comply with all current legislation (food safety, health and safety, COSHH), personal hygiene, food stored

    correctly after delivery (within 15 minutes, suitable storage environment), HACCP, critical limits, stock control (first in first out (FIFO), use-by dates), corrective actions.

    Requirements for monitoring and recording food safety controls and procedures: Mandatory keeping of records (delivery, temperature control, staff sickness, staff employment, staff training), cleaning schedules and records, maintenance schedules and records, HACCP, visitor log, organisational policies and procedures (storage and disposal of waste, pest control, recycling, responsible resourcing, procurement).

    Methods of evaluating food safety controls and procedures: Management spot inspections, analyse all records, regular audits, inspections by outside bodies (environmental health, trading standards, local authority), feedback from staff.

    Importance of evaluating food safety controls and procedures: Identify patterns of irregularity, danger areas, key indicators of risk, highlight areas that need action.

  • Outcome 4: Understand the role of the supervisor in staff training

    Requirements for induction: Legal requirement for new staff to be supervised/ trained/have instruction in food hygiene as part of the induction process, allows staff to develop good working practices.

    Ongoing training of staff: HACCP training, update current practices, awareness of new legal requirements, implement current guidelines, monitor staff performance to ensure standards being met consistently, identify training needs.

    Importance of effective communication of food safety procedures: Legal requirement, minimise risk of misunderstandings, ensure all information available to staff, staff understand their responsibilities, staff aware of procedures they need to follow, all aware of non-compliance.

    Communication: Noticeboards, staff newsletters, handbooks, leaflets (from Food Standards Agency SFBB website), staff training, staff meetings.

    UV3118020

  • UV31161Legislation in food and beverage service

    The aim of this unit is to develop your knowledge and understanding of the service of food and beverages while complying with the law. There are many laws which affect us while at work and it is important that you become aware of how the law affects your working environment.

    You will learn about the main areas of legislation that affect food and beverage service, including licensing law; having studied this you will be expected to explain how the law affects you while carrying out work in the food and beverage service industry.

    You will also learn how to comply with responsible alcohol sales guidelines and the consequences of non-compliance.

    UV31161_v5

  • Observation(s)

    GLH

    Credit value

    Level

    External paper(s)

    0

    18

    2

    3

    0

  • On completion of this unit you will:

    Learning outcomes Evidence requirements

    UV31161

    1. Understand the legislation relating to the food and beverage service

    2. Understand how legislation impacts on the food and beverage service

    3. Understand how to sell alcohol responsibly

    1. Knowledge outcomes There must be evidence that you possess all the knowledge and understanding listed in the Knowledge section of this unit. In most cases this can be done by professional discussion and/or oral questioning. Other methods, such as projects, assignments and/or reflective accounts may also be used.

    2. Tutor/Assessor guidance You will be guided by your tutor/assessor on how to achieve learning outcomes in this unit. All outcomes must be achieved.

    3. External paper There is no external paper requirement for this unit.

    23

    Legislation in food and beverage service

  • Achieving knowledge outcomes

    Developing knowledge

    You will be guided by your tutor and assessor on the evidence that needs to be produced. Your knowledge and understanding will be assessed using the assessment methods listed below*:

    Projects Observed work Witness statements Audio-visual media Evidence of prior learning or attainment Written questions Oral questions Assignments Case studies Professional discussion

    Where applicable your assessor will integrate knowledge outcomes into practical observations through professional discussion and/or oral questioning.

    When a criterion has been orally questioned and achieved, your assessor will record this evidence in written form or by other appropriate means. There is no need for you to produce additional evidence as this criterion has already been achieved.

    Some knowledge and understanding outcomes may require you to show that you know and understand how to do something. If you have practical evidence from your own work that meets knowledge criteria, then there is no requirement for you to be questioned again on the same topic.

    *This is not an exhaustive list.

    UV3116124

  • Knowledge

    UV31161 25

    Learning outcome 1

    Understand the legislation relating to the food and beverage service

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Describe the main areas of health, hygiene and safety laws and regulations which impact on the food and beverage service

    b. Explain employee and employer responsibilities in relation to licensing legislation

    c. Identify the legislation requirements relating to the sale of items to customers

    d. Identify the requirements of legislation relating to: disability equality and diversity business contracts data protection smoking misuse of drugs

  • UV3116126

    Learning outcome 2

    Understand how legislation impacts on the food and beverage service

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Explain the purpose and requirements of legislation in the food and beverage service

    b. Explain the consequences to the employee/employer of non-compliance

    c. Identify which authorities have a right of entry to premises

    d. Identify when authorities have a right of entry to premises

  • UV31161 27

    Learning outcome 3

    Understand how to sell alcohol responsibly

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Identify different strengths of alcoholic drinks by alcohol by volume (abv)

    b. Identify sensible drinking limits

    c. Explain the effects alcohol can have on the human body

    d. Explain good practice in avoiding conflict situations

    e. Describe the industry guidelines on irresponsible drinks promotions

  • Outcome 1: Understand the legislation relating to the food and beverage service

    Unit content

    This section provides guidance on the recommended knowledge and skills required to enable you to achieve each of the learning outcomes in this unit. Your tutor/assessor will ensure you have the opportunity to cover all of the unit content.

    UV3116128

    Health, hygiene and safety laws and regulations: Current at the time of delivery, health and safety at work, food safety regulations, weights and measures legislation, licensing regulations, equality, data protection legislation, manual handling regulations, control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH), sale of goods and services legislation.

    Employee and employer responsibilities:

    Employee do not serve after hours/minors/people under the influence of alcohol.

    Employer do not allow service after hours/to minors/people under the influence of alcohol, hold a personal licence.

    Legislation requirements: Must be fit for purpose, must be as advertised, must be hygienic and fit for human consumption, customer must be legally permitted to purchase.

    Requirements of legislation to related areas: Disability (reasonable adjustments must be made to the premises), equality and diversity (staff or customers must not be discriminated against), business contracts (are legally binding and must be honoured), data protection (data must be stored safely and only for as long as necessary), smoking is illegal in any workplace, use of drugs must not be permitted on the premises.

    Outcome 2: Understand how legislation impacts on the food and beverage service

    The purpose and requirements of legislation: Health and safety of staff and customers, customer satisfaction, protection of minors, consumer protection.

    The consequences of non-compliance: Employee fine, loss of employment, imprisonment.

    Employer poor reputation, loss of customers, improvement notice, loss of licence, fine, closure of business, imprisonment.

    Authorities that have a right of entry to premises: Environmental health officer, police, fire officer, trading standards officer, HM Revenue and Customs, Health and Safety Executive.

    When authorities have a right of entry to premises: When it is suspected that a crime is being or has been committed, to ensure maintenance of hygiene and safety standards.

  • UV31161 29

    Outcome 3: Understand how to sell alcohol responsibly

    Different strengths of alcoholic drinks: Beer 3-7% abv, wine 7-15% abv, fortified wine 14-20% abv, spirits 35-45% abv.

    Sensible drinking limits: Men (3-4 units per day, maximum 21 units per week), women (2-3 units per day, maximum 14 units per week).

    Effects alcohol can have on the human body: Short term drunkenness, lack of co-ordination, speaking louder, more sociable, possible alcohol poisoning.

    Long term liver disease, heart disease, diabetes, cancers, dependency.

    Good practice in avoiding conflict situations: Be polite and clear, be professional, do not argue, listen, use appropriate body language, seek assistance.

    Industry guidelines on irresponsible drinks promotions: Ensure underage drinkers are not targeted, never condone or encourage excessive drinking, should not involve drinking games, should not encourage anti-social behaviour.

  • UV3116130

    Notes Use this area for notes and diagrams

  • UV31188Principles of supervising customer service performance in hospitality leisure travel and tourism

    The aim of this unit is to develop your knowledge and understanding of building teams and motivating colleagues to promote customer service excellence within the business. You will learn about the way in which customer service is implemented, monitored and measured to drive the continuous improvement of customer service performance.

    You will also learn about the role of the supervisor in developing a customer service culture and the impact that customer service has on the performance of the business.

    UV31188_v7

  • Observation(s)

    GLH

    Credit value

    Level

    External paper(s)

    2

    20

    2

    3

    0

  • On completion of this unit you will:

    Learning outcomes

    Evidence requirements

    UV31188

    1. Understand how to build teams and motivate colleagues through techniques such as on-site coaching

    2. Understand how to develop a customer service culture within your business

    3. Understand how to effectively monitor and communicate levels of customer service performance

    You need to meet the same standard on a regular and consistent basis. Separating the assessments by a period of at least two weeks is recommended as competence must be demonstrated on a consistent and regular basis.

    4. Range All ranges must be practically demonstrated or other forms of evidence produced to show they have been covered.

    5. Knowledge outcomes There must be evidence that you possess all the knowledge and understanding listed in the Knowledge section of this unit. In most cases this can be done by professional discussion and/or oral questioning. Other methods, such as projects, assignments and/or reflective accounts may also be used.

    6. Tutor/Assessor guidance You will be guided by your tutor/assessor on how to achieve learning outcomes and cover ranges in this unit. All outcomes and ranges must be achieved.

    7. External paper There is no external paper requirement for this unit.

    1. Environment Evidence for this unit may be gathered within the workplace or realistic working environment (RWE).

    2. Simulation Simulation may be used in this unit, where no naturally occurring evidence is available.

    3. Observation outcomes Competent performance of Observation outcomes must be demonstrated on at least two occasions. Assessor observations, witness testimonies and products of work are likely to be the most appropriate sources of performance evidence. Professional discussion may be used as supplementary evidence for those criteria that do not naturally occur. Assessed observations should not be carried out on the same day for the same learning outcome. There should be sufficient time between assessments for reflection and personal development.

    33

    Principles of supervising customer service performance in hospitality leisure travel and tourism

  • Achieving observation outcomes Achieving range

    Achieving observations and range

    UV31188

    Your assessor will observe your performance of practical tasks. The minimum number of competent observations required is indicated in the Evidence requirements section of this unit.

    Criteria may not always naturally occur during a practical observation. In such instances you will be asked questions to demonstrate your competence in this area. Your assessor will document the criteria that have been achieved through professional discussion and/or oral questioning. This evidence will be recorded by your assessor in written form or by other appropriate means.

    Your assessor will sign off a learning outcome when all criteria have been competently achieved.

    The range section indicates what must be covered. Ranges should be practically demonstrated as part of an observation. Where this is not possible other forms of evidence may be produced. All ranges must be covered.

    Your assessor will document the portfolio reference once a range has been competently achieved.

    34

  • Learning outcome 1

    Observations

    You can:

    UV31188

    Observation 1 2 Optional OptionalCriteria questioned orally

    Date achieved

    Portfolio reference

    Learner signature

    Assessor initials

    *May be assessed by supplementary evidence.

    Understand how to build teams and motivate colleagues through techniques such as on-site coaching

    35

    a. Apply appropriate methods to deliver feedback to staff*

  • You must practically demonstrate that you have:

    Range

    UV31188

    Provided feedback using a minimum of 1 method Portfolio reference

    Meeting

    Staff appraisal

    Provided a minimum of 1 form of feedback Portfolio reference

    Personal development and growth

    Training and development needs (personal or team)

    Target setting (personal or team)

    It is strongly recommended that all range items are practically demonstrated. Where this is not possible, other forms of evidence may be produced to demonstrate competence.

    36

  • Developing knowledge

    UV31188 37

    Achieving knowledge outcomes

    You will be guided by your tutor and assessor on the evidence that needs to be produced. Your knowledge and understanding will be assessed using the assessment methods listed below*:

    Projects Observed work Witness statements Audio-visual media Evidence of prior learning or attainment Written questions Oral questions Assignments Case studies Professional discussion

    Where applicable your assessor will integrate knowledge outcomes into practical observations through professional discussion and/or oral questioning.

    When a criterion has been orally questioned and achieved, your assessor will record this evidence in written form or by other appropriate means. There is no need for you to produce additional evidence as this criterion has already been achieved.

    Some knowledge and understanding outcomes may require you to show that you know and understand how to do something. If you have practical evidence from your own work that meets knowledge criteria, then there is no requirement for you to be questioned again on the same topic.

    *This is not an exhaustive list.

  • Knowledge

    UV3118838

    Understand how to build teams and motivate colleagues through techniques such as on-site coaching

    You can: Portfolio reference

    b. Analyse how effective teams can be developed to deliver excellent customer service

    c. Explain the importance of staff development in ensuring that excellent customer service is delivered

    d. Describe the role of the supervisor in developing teams

    e. Describe how training and coaching sessions can be implemented to improve the delivery of customer service

    f. Describe the importance of providing feedback to staff

    Learning outcome 1

  • UV31188 39

    Learning outcome 2

    Understand how to develop a customer service culture within your business

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Describe the role of the supervisor in leading by example when delivering excellent customer service

    b. Explain the impact of customer service on the performance of the business

    c. Explain the relationship between delivering customer service and selling services

    d. Identify and apply good practice techniques to monitor the delivery of customer service against organisational standards

  • UV3118840

    Learning outcome 3

    Understand how to effectively monitor and communicate levels of customer service performance

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Analyse the importance of developing and implementing clear customer service standards

    b. Describe appropriate ways in which supervisors can monitor and measure the performance of team members

    c. Describe appropriate corrective actions that can be taken to resolve failures in the delivery of customer service

    d. Explain how performance against customer service standards can be recorded and communicated

    e. Identify ways in which measurement of the effectiveness of customer service can be used to improve future performance

  • Outcome 1: Understand how to build teams and motivate colleagues through techniques such as on-site coaching

    Unit content

    This section provides guidance on the recommended knowledge and skills required to enable you to achieve each of the learning outcomes in this unit. Your tutor/assessor will ensure you have the opportunity to cover all of the unit content.

    UV31188 41

    Appropriate methods to deliver feedback: Meetings, staff appraisal, one-to-ones, performance reviews, individually or as group, choosing a suitable time and place, delivering the positive before the negative.

    Effective teams: Effective recruitment and induction, motivation of the team, training and personal development of team members, setting team goals, understanding team members strengths/knowledge/role within the team (Belbin), building good working relationships (co-operation and understanding of others feelings, promoting courtesy and respect, encouraging a no blame/non-critical culture, building of loyalty, giving praise where it is due, explaining why decisions have been made, listening to and empathising with staff points of view, effective communication and interpersonal skills), monitoring performance, providing support and feedback on performance, retention of team members, understanding the threats to team development (high member turnover, weak or authoritarian leadership, poor definition of goals).

    Importance of staff development: Areas of staff development (product knowledge/communication/interpersonal skills, use of equipment, knowledge of company policies and procedures, knowledge of legislation, training to achieve standards of performance), importance (so that staff understand the aims and objectives of the business, to enhance staff performance, to reduce mistakes, to make improvements).

    Role of the supervisor: Monitoring and assessing staff performance, identifying training needs, selecting appropriate methods to develop staff, helping staff to put into practice what they have learned, motivating and leading the team, taking initiative, able to defuse and resolve conflict, demonstrating fairness in decision-making, monitoring the impact of staff development.

    Implementation of training and coaching: Recognising what training and coaching is required, planning training and coaching to fit the needs of the business and the staff, setting objectives, using appropriate techniques (shadowing to allow observation of best practice by an experienced member of staff/expert, providing one-to-one support to staff members through mentoring, classroom training in a specific environment on specific subjects, role play can be used to simulate situations and improve interpersonal skills, use of on-line training), monitoring and evaluating the outcome of the training.

    Importance of providing feedback to staff: To motivate, to assist personal development and growth, to identify further training and development needs, to aid target setting, to ensure staff understand the aims/objectives/performance requirements against targets of the business, to assist the development of the team.

  • Outcome 2: Understand how to develop a customer service culture within your business

    UV3118842

    Role of the supervisor: Demonstrating good customer service skills (personal presentation, knowledge of products and services, communication and listening skills, anticipating customers needs and expectations, creating unique customer service experiences, dealing with and rectifying customer problems promptly), communicating team goals, working according to organisational procedures, demonstrating a positive attitude, effective leadership.

    Impact of customer service: Increased sales and productivity, enhanced reputation, repeat business and brand loyalty, referred customers, fewer complaints, reduced staff turnover, increased job satisfaction and staff motivation, increased competitiveness, mitigates the risks of negative feedback (loss of business, damaged reputation, cost of damage repair).

    Relationship between delivering customer service and selling services: Customer loyalty is as a direct result of delivering customer service satisfaction, staff are able to build rapport with customers through person to person interaction, value can be added to the products and services through the staff description of them, the customers needs can be established and products and services matched to them, building relationships with customers can have a direct impact on the number of sales, upselling and cross-selling, repeat business and enhancing the organisations reputation.

    Monitor delivery of customer service: Organisational standards (the way business is conducted, what is deemed

    as acceptable and expected behaviour, standards of performance), techniques (use of performance indicators, analysis of customer feedback, investigation and analysis of complaints, use of mystery shoppers, using information to review and improve standards).

  • Outcome 3: Understand how to effectively monitor and communicate levels of customer service performance

    UV31188 43

    Importance of developing and implementing clear customer service standards: Benefits (allows standardisation of practices and procedures, encourages consistency in the level of service provided, enables staff to complete jobs and tasks in a set way to achieve the same outcome and level of service, encourages transparency of service and provision), must be clear/measurable/written/accessible/appropriate to product or service.

    Appropriate ways in which supervisors can monitor and measure the performance of team members: Self-assessment and target setting, using customer feedback (surveys, informal comments, complaints, mystery shopping), using financial data to indicate performance (turnover, repeat business, profit), monitoring performance against team objectives, using appraisal and performance review, observation, benchmarking.

    Appropriate corrective actions that can be taken to resolve failures: Investigate what has gone wrong, determine the cause of the problem, offer support and development to underperforming team members, involve staff in the process, consider revision of team responsibilities, review and evaluate working arrangements and practices, feedback any changes to staff, apologise and resolve customer problems.

    Recording and communicating performance against customer service standards: Verbally (in team meetings or one-to-ones), in writing (reports, memos, emails, target scoreboard).

    Improving staff performance: Identify areas for improvement, identify areas of good practice, identify training needs, re-evaluate customer needs/expectations, indicate the need to implement new initiatives (loyalty schemes, incentives, prices), lead to the amendment of standards of performance.

  • UV3118844

    Notes Use this area for notes and diagrams

  • UV31195Principles of supervising food and beverage services

    The aim of this unit is to develop the knowledge and understanding required to supervise the food and beverage service, including how to manage the environmental impact of work and how to contribute to the management of finance.

    UV31195_v6

  • Observation(s)

    GLH

    Credit value

    Level

    External paper(s)

    0

    35

    5

    3

    0

  • On completion of this unit you will:

    Learning outcomes Evidence requirements

    UV31195

    1. Understand the role of the food and beverage service supervisor

    2. Understand how to manage the environmental impact of food and beverage operations

    3. Understand how to contribute to the management of finance in the food and beverage operation

    1. Knowledge outcomes There must be evidence that you possess all the knowledge and understanding listed in the Knowledge section of this unit. In most cases this can be done by professional discussion and/or oral questioning. Other methods, such as projects, assignments and/or reflective accounts may also be used.

    2. Tutor/Assessor guidance You will be guided by your tutor/assessor on how to achieve learning outcomes in this unit. All outcomes must be achieved.

    3. External paper There is no external paper requirement for this unit.

    47

    Principles of supervising food and beverage services

  • Achieving knowledge outcomes

    Developing knowledge

    You will be guided by your tutor and assessor on the evidence that needs to be produced. Your knowledge and understanding will be assessed using the assessment methods listed below*:

    Projects Observed work Witness statements Audio-visual media Evidence of prior learning or attainment Written questions Oral questions Assignments Case studies Professional discussion

    Where applicable your assessor will integrate knowledge outcomes into practical observations through professional discussion and/or oral questioning.

    When a criterion has been orally questioned and achieved, your assessor will record this evidence in written form or by other appropriate means. There is no need for you to produce additional evidence as this criterion has already been achieved.

    Some knowledge and understanding outcomes may require you to show that you know and understand how to do something. If you have practical evidence from your own work that meets knowledge criteria, then there is no requirement for you to be questioned again on the same topic.

    *This is not an exhaustive list.

    UV3119548

  • Knowledge

    UV31195 49

    Learning outcome 1

    Understand the role of the food and beverage service supervisor

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Describe communication methods used within teams in food and beverage service

    b. Explain when it is appropriate to communicate with team members using the following methods: verbal instructions/demonstrations written instructions/demonstrations pictures/diagrams

    c. Explain appropriate times to give feedback to team members

    d. Explain how to give constructive feedback to team members on performance

    e. Explain the importance of conducting briefings both pre-service and post service

    f. Explain how briefings should be conducted

    g. Explain how to motivate teams to achieve the required standards of quality

    h. Explain how to motivate individuals to achieve the required standards of quality

    i. Explain how to monitor activities and performance against standards and targets

    j. Explain the action to be taken if activities and performance do not meet organisational standards and targets

  • UV3119550

    Learning outcome 2

    Understand how to manage the environmental impact of food and beverage operations

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Explain the environmental policies that impact food and beverage operations

    b. State the risks posed by the food and beverage operation to the environment

    c. Explain how to minimise the negative impact resources may have on the environment

    d. Explain how to maximise the positive impact resources may have on the environment

    e. Describe ways in which energy use may be minimised

    f. Explain sustainability considerations when ordering stock

    g. Explain how to engage the team in sustainability activities

  • UV31195 51

    Learning outcome 3

    Understand how to contribute to the management of finance in the food and beverage operation

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Define the term gross profit

    b. Define the term net profit

    c. Explain what makes an organisation profitable

    d. Explain the importance of using approved suppliers

    e. Explain how effective stock control can contribute to the financial stability of the organisation

    f. Explain the factors which must be monitored to control costs and profit

  • Outcome 1: Understand the role of the food and beverage service supervisor

    Unit content

    This section provides guidance on the recommended knowledge and skills required to enable you to achieve each of the learning outcomes in this unit. Your tutor/assessor will ensure you have the opportunity to cover all of the unit content.

    UV3119552

    Communication methods: Verbal (tone of voice, appropriate language), non-verbal (body language, eye contact), written (layout, accurate spelling/grammar/punctuation), appropriate to audience (colleague, manager, customer).

    Appropriate communication with team members using specific methods: Verbal (face to face, telephone) instructions, demonstrations, effectiveness depends on the clarity of speech, pitch, volume, speed, body language.

    Written (letters, emails, handbooks, brochures, formal business proposals) effectiveness depends on the writing style (grammar, vocabulary, clarity, language).

    Pictures/diagrams communicating through visual aids (signs, symbols, drawing, graphic design).

    Appropriate times to give feedback to team members: Appropriate times (feedback immediately, negative feedback privately, providing positive feedback publicly, meetings, staff appraisal, staff newsletter, email, being specific, being honest, maintaining team focus, appropriate times for feedback (time of day, during and post service).

    Giving feedback to team members on performance: Planning what to say and how it will be said, praising by focusing on the positives first and offering feedback on what can be improved, giving constructive feedback clearly and concisely, adopting

    an appropriate approach to each team member, focusing towards solutions by giving team members the confidence to solve problems and resolve situations that have arisen and supporting them to do this, following up by agreeing actions required and scheduling a follow-up meeting to discuss progress as a result of the feedback.

    Importance of conducting pre-service briefings: Confirming service standards, encouraging team members to ask questions regarding service, ensure all staff have accurate food and drink knowledge, confirming duties of team members, motivating team members.

    Importance of conducting post-service briefings: Assessing if objectives and service targets have been achieved, giving individuals or team the opportunity to talk about their experience, discussing how they managed to carry out their duties, identifying individuals in need of support, giving support and monitoring their future performance, discuss difficulties that arose.

    Conducting briefings: Timings of the briefings, start on time, ensure everyone is present, setting objectives, reinforce service standards, motivating, delegating tasks, professional appearance, food and drink sampling, encouraging team members to ask questions regarding service and food and drink knowledge, informing team members about specials and any VIP customers, informing team members of items not in stock.

  • Outcome 1: Understand the role of the food and beverage service supervisor (continued)

    UV31195 53

    Motivating teams to achieve quality standards: Ensuring quality standards are communicated and understood (good induction and training), involving team members (increasing responsibility, allowing team members to find creative solutions to problems), following formal routes (informing unmotivated team members of the consequences of undesirable behaviour), setting an example (dedication and energy), increasing team members commitment to the business goal and turning unmotivated team members into an enthusiastic team).

    Motivating individuals to achieve quality standards: Giving individual members significant goals, using performance measures to focus their thinking and work, providing regular sense of accomplishment, encouraging creativity in developing better ways to achieve the goal, giving quick responses to provide fast feedback enabling team members to improve and adapt, giving rewards, development and promotion opportunities.

    Monitoring activities and performance against standards and targets: Observing and assessing the performance of individuals and teams against set standards and targets, customer feedback, team feedback, financial data, competitor activity.

    Action to be taken if activities and performance do not meet standards and targets: Investigating to establish cause, supporting and developing under-performing team members, reviewing team responsibilities, re-evaluating team working arrangements.

  • Outcome 2: Understand how to manage the environmental impact of food and beverage operations

    UV3119554

    Environmental policies that impact food and beverage operations: As current at time of delivery, current policies (environmental protection including any amendments made to the legislation, waste regulations, hazardous waste regulations, environmental protection and duty of care regulations, and control of pollution regulations.

    Risks posed by food and beverage operations to the environment: Rapid growth of algae and bacteria due to release of untreated wastes to surface waters resulting in reduction of oxygen supply and destruction of fish populations (eutrophication), greenhouse gas emissions, litter and waste production, water and energy use.

    Minimising the negative impact resources may have on the environment: Reducing emissions, complying with environmental regulations, improving resource efficiency, recycling of waste products.

    Maximising the positive impact resources may have on the environment: Environmental awareness, effective planning, encouraging use of renewable resources, generating economic benefits for local people, involving local people in decisions that affect their lives.

    Minimising energy use: Promoting energy efficiency and reducing carbon emissions, monitoring and recording emissions from energy use, minimising non-sustainable energy use, low energy consumption equipment, timed and proximity lighting.

    Sustainability considerations when ordering stock: Costs and benefits, locally-sourced seasonal products, ability

    to repeat without reducing resources, recycling, saving energy and reducing waste, screening supplies to ensure they are ethically sound, minimal food miles, using refillable dispensers, eco-friendly equipment and products, reduction of carbon footprint, carbon offsetting.

    Engaging the team in sustainability activities: Agreeing targets and implementing specific solutions to help the business operate in a more environmentally sustainable way, educating/raising awareness, cost savings by integrating energy efficiency into the workplace and products and services, engaging the team to capture ideas, communicating and sharing best practices, giving feedback on progress and achievements.

  • Outcome 3: Understand how to contribute to the management of finance in the food and beverage operation

    UV31195 55

    Gross profit: Profit after selling a product or service and deducting the cost associated with its production and sale.

    Net profit: The gross profit minus overheads, minus interest payable for a given time period.

    What makes an organisation profitable: Innovative management of products, new improved products/services, business levels, efficient processes, customer perception, change with varying customer needs and expectations, good brand/image, modern ingredients, excellent customer service.

    Importance of using approved suppliers: Ensure quality of supplies, ensuring quality and delivery performance, consistency, building long-term supplier relationships, minimising the risk of disputes.

    How effective stock control can contribute to organisations financial stability: Maintain the balance of expenses and profits by keeping stock on hand for demands that may arise in any situation, knowing the quantity of items to be stored and implementing a good control of inventory to help maximise profits, understanding the related costs in having stock in hand, running out of stock and when to place orders to obtain the right formula and create the best inventory management scheme for the business.

    Effective stock control security of stores, keeping accurate stock records, complete accurate stock recording, reasons for holding stock, systems of stock control (ABC analysis, quantity-based systems, time-based systems), financial considerations, the effect of stock control

    on working capital (cash flow, return on investment, stock turnover).

    Contribution to financial stability reduces waste, reduces complaints, ensures quality of stock.

    Factors which must be monitored to control costs and profit: Fixed costs (rent, mortgage, insurance, utility bills), variable costs (food and beverages, wages).

  • UV3119556

    Notes Use this area for notes and diagrams

  • UV31202Principles of promoting food and beverage services and products

    The aim of this unit is to develop your knowledge and understanding of how services and products are promoted within the food and beverage industry. In promoting food and beverage services and products you will need to understand the different factors that impact on service and the importance of providing a positive meal experience. You will also learn about the use of sales and marketing, and the effect this has on the service offered.

    UV31202_v5

  • Observation(s)

    GLH

    Credit value

    Level

    External paper(s)

    0

    45

    6

    3

    0

  • On completion of this unit you will:

    Learning outcomes Evidence requirements

    UV31202

    1. Understand the importance of product knowledge in food and beverage service

    2. Understand the factors that influence the food and beverage service

    3. Understand how to supervise different styles of service

    4. Understand the concepts of a meal experience

    5. Be able to describe different menu styles and types

    6. Understand the use of sales and marketing in food and beverage service

    1. Knowledge outcomes There must be evidence that you possess all the knowledge and understanding listed in the Knowledge section of this unit. In most cases this can be done by professional discussion and/or oral questioning. Other methods, such as projects, assignments and/or reflective accounts may also be used.

    2. Tutor/Assessor guidance You will be guided by your tutor/assessor on how to achieve learning outcomes in this unit. All outcomes must be achieved.

    3. External paper There is no external paper requirement for this unit.

    59

    Principles of promoting food and beverage services and products

  • Achieving knowledge outcomes

    Developing knowledge

    You will be guided by your tutor and assessor on the evidence that needs to be produced. Your knowledge and understanding will be assessed using the assessment methods listed below*:

    Projects Observed work Witness statements Audio-visual media Evidence of prior learning or attainment Written questions Oral questions Assignments Case studies Professional discussion

    Where applicable your assessor will integrate knowledge outcomes into practical observations through professional discussion and/or oral questioning.

    When a criterion has been orally questioned and achieved, your assessor will record this evidence in written form or by other appropriate means. There is no need for you to produce additional evidence as this criterion has already been achieved.

    Some knowledge and understanding outcomes may require you to show that you know and understand how to do something. If you have practical evidence from your own work that meets knowledge criteria, then there is no requirement for you to be questioned again on the same topic.

    *This is not an exhaustive list.

    UV3120260

  • Knowledge

    UV31202 61

    Learning outcome 1

    Understand the importance of product knowledge in food and beverage service

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Explain the impact different dietary requirements have within a food and beverage service outlet

    b. Explain the impact different cooking terms used in a menu have on service

    c. Explain the importance of food and beverage product knowledge

    d. Explain factors that need to be considered when choosing a supplier

  • UV3120262

    Learning outcome 2

    Understand the factors that influence the food and beverage service

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Explain how different cultures and religions influence food and beverage service

    b. Describe the historic influences on food and beverage service

    c. Explain how media and modern technology influence food and beverage service

    d. Explain how changes in lifestyle influence food and beverage service

    e. Explain how changes in trends influence food and beverage service

  • UV31202 63

    Learning outcome 3

    Understand how to supervise different styles of service

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Compare different styles of food and beverage service

    b. Explain how to identify trends in levels of demand for different styles of service

    c. Explain how different styles of service influence staff requirements

    d. Compare the preparation needed for different styles of service

    e. Compare the resources needed for different styles of service

  • UV3120264

    Learning outcome 4

    Understand the concepts of a meal experience

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Explain the term meal experience

    b. Evaluate different meal experiences

    c. Explain how customer perceptions impact on the meal experience

    d. Explain the importance of food and beverage service staff contributing to the meal experience

    e. Explain the importance of gaining customer feedback on food and beverage service

    f. Explain the methods for gaining customer feedback on food and beverage service

  • UV31202 65

    Learning outcome 5

    Be able to describe different menu styles and types

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Describe different menu styles and types

    b. Explain the importance of language use in creating menus

    c. Explain the legislative requirements relevant to creating menus

    d. Identify key information that needs to be displayed on the beverage menu

    e. Explain how to deal with unexpected problems that may occur with menus

  • UV3120266

    Learning outcome 6

    Understand the use of sales and marketing in food and beverage service

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Outline the legal requirements that should be taken into account when developing and implementing promotional activities

    b. Explain how promotional activities can be generated from a sales report

    c. Identify key opportunities to implement promotional activities

    d. Identify the target markets, sales targets and main competitors that are relevant to food and beverage service

    e. Explain how competitors influence the food and beverage service

    f. Identify a range of promotional activities relevant to food and beverage service

    g. Compare different selling techniques in food and beverage service

    h. Explain how the following impact on food and beverage outlets: guide books ratings restaurant critics

  • Outcome 1: Understand the importance of product knowledge in food and beverage service

    Unit content

    This section provides guidance on the recommended knowledge and skills required to enable you to achieve each of the learning outcomes in this unit. Your tutor/assessor will ensure you have the opportunity to cover all of the unit content.

    UV31202 67

    Impact of dietary requirements on food and beverage service outlets: The need to provide choice and balance, labelling food clearly, training staff and making all staff aware of possible customer needs (e.g. diabetes, food allergies, intolerances, special diets).

    Impact on service of different cooking terms used in a menu: Customer satisfaction, motivating the employees to provide a responsible and successful service, need to inform customers about the time that preparation and cooking of the dishes may take, knowing which dishes are ready for quick service to customers in a hurry, operational factors (e.g. layout, equipment, technical skills of employees).

    Food: Canaps and other appetisers/starters, soups, egg dishes, pasta and rice dishes, fish, meats, poultry, game, vegetables, salads and dressings, accompaniments, sauces, cold buffet, cheese, sweets, dessert, fruit.

    Beverages: Bottled, draught, drinks in cans, drinks in cartons, free pouring/optics, alcoholic and cold non-alcoholic drinks, coffee, hot chocolate, tea, steamed milk drinks, iced drinks (frapp/iced tea).

    Importance of food and beverage product knowledge: Improving customer satisfaction, increasing customer spending, increasing profitability, providing information and advice, promotions, dealing with complaints, business reputation.

    Factors that need to be considered when choosing a supplier: Price, product, technical support, delivery time, consistency, service, quality and reliability, market information, ethical and environmental practices, other factors (e.g. contract terms and conditions).

  • Outcome 2: Understand the factors that influence the food and beverage service

    UV3120268

    Influence of different cultures and religions: Customers perception of service staff, staff behaviour, quality of service, quality of food and beverages on offer, customer satisfaction, staff recognition and understanding of the differences that exist based on culture and religion, training and service provision of staff to effectively respond to customers with different cultures and religions (e.g. Chinese, Indian, Islam, Judaism), availability of a range of prices, food presentation.

    Historic influences: Styles of food (e.g. countries, types of dishes, religion, culture, lifestyle, economic conditions), availability of commodities (e.g. imports from other regions, local availability), neighbouring countries and immigration, table etiquette, service styles and techniques.

    Influence of media: Marketing opportunities, establishing the businesss presence, promotional tools, importance of blogs and keywords to drive traffic to businesss websites and premises, word of mouth, social media.

    Influence of modern technology: Accounting software, booking systems, positive influence on productivity when supported by effective supervision and training, providing support to employees, enhancing the quality of service, improving efficiencies, gaining competitive advantage, maintaining relationships with customers, increasing profitability, improving accuracy and record keeping.

    Influence of changes in lifestyle: Levels of disposable income, income distribution, increase in eating out, number of holidays/short breaks taken, binge drinking, healthy eating, rise in vegetarianism, consumer

    buying patterns, impact of media, other current social trends.

    Influence of changes in trends on food and beverage: Eating at home/home baking and making, health and wellbeing, fixed price eating, speed and convenience, cheaper cuts, urban farming, zero-waste eating, tap water, seasonality, sustainability, globalisation, eastern influences, microbreweries, binge drinking, new products, service styles, government initiatives.

  • Outcome 3: Understand how to supervise different styles of service

    UV31202 69

    Different styles of food and beverage service: Cart service or guridon service (French service), plate service (American service), platter service (Russian service), family-style service (Chinese service), butler service (English service), service concepts (buffet, counter, cafeteria, self-service).

    Identifying trends in levels of demand for different styles of service: Guridon service (high menu price, elegant, sought only by a small number of diners), plate service (can be modified to suit different situations and needs), platter service (suited to seated service of large groups eating the same meal, can be quite elegant), family-style service (suited for special occasions, for elaborate meals), butler service (suited to private parties).

    Influence of different styles of service on staff requirements: Quantity of staff, skill levels of staff, staff hours, range of staff positions.

    Preparation needed for different styles of service: Layout of room, equipment needed, briefing staff, time, training, health and safety considerations.

    Resources needed for different styles of service: Guridon service (large number of tools and equipment, space requirement, experienced and skilled servers required), plate service (few dishes are used, little space required), platter service (little space required), family-style service (extensive use of ware), butler service (small tables/stands may be set at the right and left of the host so dishes on which food was served can be removed).

  • Outcome 4: Understand the concepts of a meal experience

    UV3120270

    Meal experience: Location of restaurant, atmosphere, service, food, price, customer satisfaction (e.g. physiological, economic, social, psychological, convenience).

    Evaluate different meal experiences: Motivation, expectation, interaction, involvement, satisfaction, needs (e.g. social, physiological), eating for pleasure or necessity (e.g. business lunch, special occasion, meal with friends, wedding celebration, conference, function, during a shopping trip, when travelling).

    Impact of customer perceptions: Food and service quality in relation to the dining experience and their connection to each other, refinement of the service system in response to customer feedback.

    Importance of staff contributing to the meal experience: Organised staff improve the meal experience and ensure customer satisfaction, product knowledge, interpersonal and technical skills, ability to work as part of a team to meet customer expectations, repeat business, maintaining business reputation.

    Importance of gaining customer feedback: Enabling continuous improvement of customer service, finding out how customers like to be treated, what the business is doing right, what could be done better, marketing tool, responding to customer input by making changes, maintaining standards, improving staff morale, identifying staff training and development needs.

    Methods for gaining customer feedback: Asking customers directly, informal comments, arranging focus groups, questionnaires and surveys, usage statistics, suggestion cards,

    complaints, staff suggestions, mystery shoppers, qualitative/quantitative feedback.

  • Outcome 5: Be able to describe different menu styles and types

    UV31202 71

    Menu styles: Handwritten, word processed, laminated, book-style folding, blackboard, menu board (inside and/or outside), digital displays, online.

    Menu types: la carte, table dhte or fixed price, other types (e.g. cyclical, buffet, banquet, childrens, drinks).

    Importance of language: Correct spelling highlights professionalism, ensures customer understanding, selling point of a business, advertising and marketing tool, providing useful information to customers, correctly categorising items.

    Legislative requirements: Current at time of delivery, requirements (e.g. following labelling legislation (such as the food labelling regulations (as amended)), sale and supply of goods to consumers regulations, price marking order, weights and measures legislation, consumer protection from unfair trading regulations), ensuring that foods that can cause severe allergic reactions are mentioned in the name of the dish or the description on the menu (e.g. dairy, nuts, wheat), updating menus when recipes change, providing a full translation if menus are in a language other than English, indicating the use of unrefined nut or seed oils in cooking or in dressings on the menus, not claiming a dish is free from a particular food unless this has been checked and is correct.

    Key information on beverage menus: Prices, weights and measures (compliance with weights and measures legislation), other information (e.g. country of origin, alcohol by volume (ABV) content, ingredients, description of beverage).

    Unexpected problems: Handwritten changes on printed menus, misspelling

    items, listing items that are not always available, items not available, change of recipe, print that is too small to read easily, menus that are too big to handle easily, lack of English translations for non-English words or phrases, items that do not look like their photos, not enough menus, damaged menus.

    Dealing with unexpected problems: Ensure staff have full and current menu knowledge, staff meeting before service, communication with kitchen, easily accessible menu printing for staff, staff training in dealing with problems.

  • Outcome 6: Understand the use of sales and marketing in food and beverage service

    UV3120272

    Legal requirements: Current at time of delivery, relevant laws (e.g. Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations, health and safety at work legislation, discrimination legislation, copyright law, food hygiene regulations (as amended)).

    Generating promotional activities from a sales report: Using sales reports and sales forecast data to offer incentives with the purchase of a product to increase the sales of a given product (e.g. discounts, free items, a contest).

    Key opportunities: Analysing data on previous promotional activities, identifying possible activities to promote food and beverage service, identifying potential sales improvements that promotional activities could generate, considering resources that will be available for promotional activities, consulting with relevant colleagues about ideas for promotional activities, gathering relevant information to support ideas for promotional activities, special occasions, supplier offers, off-peak offers.

    Target markets, sales targets and main competitors: Target markets (the group of customers that the business has decided to aim its marketing at), sales targets (specified amount of sales that management sets for achieving or exceeding within a specific timeframe), main competitors (existing businesses in market area).

    Influence of competitors: Leading businesses to develop new products/services/technologies, giving customers greater selection and better products, price, promotions, clusters of the same style of businesses.

    Promotional activities: Direct contact (e.g. in-house selling, personal selling, direct mail, sales promotion, point of sale activity, merchandising), indirect contact (e.g. advertising, brochures, publicity, sponsorship, branding, signs and displays), online marketing, joint promotional activities between different businesses.

    Selling techniques: Proactive and reactive, add-ons, descriptive, up-selling, cross-selling, substitute selling.

    Impact on food and beverage outlets: Guidebooks direct customers to types of businesses, giving the location and reviews of the businesses for customers to decide whether or not to visit.

    Ratings Michelin, Gault Millau guide, identify businesses according to their quality using stars or other symbols.

    Restaurant critics shape peoples perceptions about food, influencing customers decisions to visit businesses.

  • UV31173Supervise food and beverage service

    The aim of this unit is to prepare you for the supervision of food and beverage services. You will study how to ensure the service area is prepared on time and appropriately. You will allocate staff to various tasks to meet operational and customer needs, especially when unexpected problems arise.

    You will put this into practice by supervising the food service, bar, coffee and reception areas while interacting with customers and staff to ensure a smooth service, and providing feedback afterwards.

    UV31173_v5

  • Observation(s)

    GLH

    Credit value

    Level

    External paper(s)

    2

    44

    5

    3

    0

  • On completion of this unit you will:

    Learning outcomes

    Evidence requirements

    UV31173

    1. Be able to supervise food service2. Be able to supervise beverage service3. Be able to supervise reception area4. Understand how to supervise the food and

    beverage service

    You need to meet the same standard on a regular and consistent basis. Separating the assessments by a period of at least two weeks is recommended as competence must be demonstrated on a consistent and regular basis.

    4. Knowledge outcomes There must be evidence that you possess all the knowledge and understanding listed in the Knowledge section of this unit. In most cases this can be done by professional discussion and/or oral questioning. Other methods, such as projects, assignments and/or reflective accounts may also be used.

    5. Tutor/Assessor guidance You will be guided by your tutor/assessor on how to achieve learning outcomes in this unit. All outcomes must be achieved.

    6. External paper There is no external paper requirement for this unit.

    1. Environment Evidence for this unit may be gathered within the workplace or realistic working environment (RWE).

    2. Simulation Simulation may be used in this unit, where no naturally occurring evidence is available.

    3. Observation outcomes Competent performance of Observation outcomes must be demonstrated on at least two occasions. Assessor observations, witness testimonies and products of work are likely to be the most appropriate sources of performance evidence. Professional discussion may be used as supplementary evidence for those criteria that do not naturally occur. Assessed observations should not be carried out on the same day for the same learning outcome. There should be sufficient time between assessments for reflection and personal development.

    75

    Supervise food and beverage service

  • Achieving observation outcomes Achieving range

    Achieving observations and range

    UV31173

    Your assessor will observe your performance of practical tasks. The minimum number of competent observations required is indicated in the Evidence requirements section of this unit.

    Criteria may not always naturally occur during a practical observation. In such instances you will be asked questions to demonstrate your competence in this area. Your assessor will document the criteria that have been achieved through professional discussion and/or oral questioning. This evidence will be recorded by your assessor in written form or by other appropriate means.

    Your assessor will sign off a learning outcome when all criteria have been competently achieved.

    There is no range section that applies to this unit.

    76

  • Learning outcome 1

    Observations

    You can:

    UV31173

    Observation 1 2 Optional OptionalCriteria questioned orally

    Date achieved

    Portfolio reference

    Learner signature

    Assessor initials

    *May be assessed by supplementary evidence.

    Be able to supervise food service

    77

    a. Ensure food service area is set up in accordance with business needs

    b. Agree allocation of food service duties with team according to service requirements

    c. Monitor table serviced. Interact with customers throughout the

    service

    e. Ensure that procedures for clearing, cleaning and stocking food service areas are followed correctly

  • Learning outcome 2

    You can:

    UV31173

    Observation 1 2 Optional OptionalCriteria questioned orally

    Date achieved

    Portfolio reference

    Learner signature

    Assessor initials

    a. Ensure bar area is set up in accordance with business needs

    b. Ensure coffee area is set up in accordance with business needs

    c. Agree allocation of beverage service duties with team according to service requirements

    d. Maintain the comfort and wellbeing of customers in the bar area

    e. Ensure that procedures for clearing, cleaning and stocking beverage service areas are followed correctly

    Be able to supervise beverage service

    78

    *May be assessed by supplementary evidence.

  • Learning outcome 3

    You can:

    UV31173

    Observation 1 2 Optional OptionalCriteria questioned orally

    Date achieved

    Portfolio reference

    Learner signature

    Assessor initials

    a. Ensure staff maintain the appearance of the reception area

    b. Liaise with food and beverage service supervisors to provide information on: bookings changes to service

    c. Allocate and brief staff to reception duties including: personal presentation standard of behaviour relevant procedures work routines

    d. Oversee the arrival, seating arrangements and departure of customers

    e. Ensure team follow procedures for: maintaining payment points answering telephone calls customer queries/complaints

    Be able to supervise reception area

    79

    *May be assessed by supplementary evidence.

  • Achieving knowledge outcomes

    Developing knowledge

    You will be guided by your tutor and assessor on the evidence that needs to be produced. Your knowledge and understanding will be assessed using the assessment methods listed below*:

    Projects Observed work Witness statements Audio-visual media Evidence of prior learning or attainment Written questions Oral questions Assignments Case studies Professional discussion

    Where applicable your assessor will integrate knowledge outcomes into practical observations through professional discussion and/or oral questioning.

    When a criterion has been orally questioned and achieved, your assessor will record this evidence in written form or by other appropriate means. There is no need for you to produce additional evidence as this criterion has already been achieved.

    Some knowledge and understanding outcomes may require you to show that you know and understand how to do something. If you have practical evidence from your own work that meets knowledge criteria, then there is no requirement for you to be questioned again on the same topic.

    *This is not an exhaustive list.

    UV3117380

  • Knowledge

    UV31173 81

    Learning outcome 1

    Be able to supervise food service

    You can: Portfolio reference

    f. Provide feedback to the appropriate person on the effectiveness of procedures in the food service area

  • UV3117382

    Learning outcome 2

    Be able to supervise beverage service

    You can: Portfolio reference

    f. Ensure specified standards and procedures for the service of products are maintained

    g. Ensure the beverage service complies with social responsibility practices and relevant legislation

    h. Provide feedback to the appropriate person on the effectiveness of procedures in the beverage service area

  • UV31173 83

    Learning outcome 3

    Be able to supervise reception area

    You can: Portfolio reference

    f. Recommend ways of improving the reception service

    g. Provide feedback to the appropriate person on the effectiveness of procedures in the reception area

  • UV3117384

    Learning outcome 4

    Understand how to supervise the food and beverage service

    You can: Portfolio reference

    a. Explain the importance of setting up service areas in accordance with business needs

    b. Explain how to regulate the time available and prioritise tasks

    c. Describe how staff should communicate with customers and conduct themselves in the food and beverage service area

    d. Explain how to communicate operational procedures to staff

    e. Explain how to ensure staff receive the correct training to support their responsibilities

    f. Explain how to allocate staff duties according to service requirements

    g. Explain how to minimise the disruption to the service when problems occur

    h. Explain the importance of keeping customers informed of potential problems with service

    i. Explain how to inform customers of problems with service

  • Outcome 1: Be able to supervise food service

    Unit content

    This section provides guidance on the recommended knowledge and skills required to enable you to achieve each of the learning outcomes in this unit. Your tutor/assessor will ensure you have the opportunity to cover all of the unit content.

    UV31173 85

    Food area set up in accordance with business needs: Professionalism, customer satisfaction, increase sales, attract customers, correct layout of tables (e.g. for bookings, estimate of chance customers), sufficient equipment available, sufficient stock available.

    Allocation of food service duties: Division of service stations according to bookings, division of preparation tasks (e.g. lay up, preparing sideboards, preparing still area, cleaning tasks in service areas).

    Monitoring table service: Customer satisfaction, speed of service, accuracy of service, tidiness of food service area, efficient allocation of tasks to staff.

    Interact with customers: Customer satisfaction, monitoring standards (e.g. food, staff, service), repeat custom, up-selling.

    Ensuring procedures for clearing, cleaning and stocking are followed correctly: Monitor staff, reallocate staff as required, maintain tidy food service area, ensure there is sufficient stock for service, customer satisfaction, cleaning operations after customers leave.

    Feedback on effectiveness of procedures: Immediately, after service, during team meetings, during the pre-service briefing, at appraisal meetings.

  • Outcome 2: Be able to supervise beverage service

    UV3117386

    Bar and coffee areas are set up in accordance with business needs: Correct layout of furniture (e.g. tables, chairs, stools), expected numbers (e.g. for bookings, estimate of chance customers), sufficient equipment available, sufficient stock available.

    Allocate duties: Division of tasks according to bookings (e.g. drink preparation, drink service, taking orders), division of preparation tasks (e.g. bar, coffee bar, cleaning tasks in bar or coffee areas).

    Comfort and wellbeing of customers: Customer satisfaction, take orders on arrival, serve drinks as soon as possible, top up glasses, offer alternatives to customers, provide advice if needed.

    Ensure procedures for clearing, cleaning and stocking are followed correctly: Monitor staff, reallocate staff as required, maintain tidy beverage area, ensure there is sufficient stock for service, customer satisfaction, cleaning operations after customers leave.

    Specified standards and procedures are maintained: Monitor service, reallocate staff as required, maintain tidy bar area, ensure there is sufficient stock for service, customer satisfaction, cleaning operations after customers leave, correct disposal of waste.

    Social responsibility and relevant legislation: Underage drinkers, never condone or encourage excessive drinking, should not permit drinking games, should not encourage anti-social behaviour, current legislation at time of delivery, health and safety at work, food safety, weights and measures, licensing, equality, sale of goods and services.

    Feedback on effectiveness of procedures: Immediately, after service, during team meetings, during the pre-service briefing, at appraisal meetings.

  • Outcome 3: Be able to supervise reception area

    UV31173 87

    Maintain the appearance of the reception area: First impressions, customer service, promotions, clean and tidy.

    Liaise with food and beverage supervisors: Bookings, chance customers, special requests, special parties, discounts, promotions, restrictions of availability, maximum customer numbers.

    Allocate duties: Division of tasks (e.g. telephone, receiving customers, billing, payments).

    Arrival, seating and departure: Customer satisfaction, greeted on arrival, coats taken, shown to seats/table promptly, escorted to the door, further bookings offered, coats returned.

    Procedures for team to follow: Maintaining payment point (e.g. security, keep locked, only authorised users), answering telephone calls (e.g. maximum number of rings, standard greeting, record details, repeat details, thank caller), customer queries/complaints (e.g. appropriate responses, limits of authority).

    Ways of improving the reception service: Technology, staffing, standards of service.

    Feedback on the effectiveness of procedures: Immediately, after service, during team meetings, during the pre-service briefing, at appraisal meetings.

  • Outcome 4: Understand how to supervise the food and beverage service

    UV3117388

    Setting up service areas in accordance with business needs: Correct layout of tables (e.g. for bookings, estimate of chance customers), sufficient equipment available, sufficient stock available.

    Importance of setting up service areas: Professionalism, customer satisfaction, increase sales, attract customers.

    Regulate time available and prioritise tasks: Time until service, prepare customer areas first, lay tables for booked/regular customers first, ensure products which need chilling or warming are prepared first.

    Communicate with customers and conduct: Professional attitude, appropriate body language, welcoming, appropriate language use (e.g. no slang or bad language).

    Communicate operational procedures to staff: Pre-service briefing, after service briefing, staff development, appraisal, individual feedback.

    Training staff to support their responsibilities: Monitor staff performance, give appropriate feedback, support staff to improve, staff development (e.g. on the job training, courses, company schemes).

    Allocate duties: Division of service stations according to bookings, division of preparation tasks (e.g. lay up, preparing sideboards, preparing still area, preparing for drinks service, cleaning tasks in service areas).

    Minimise disruption to service when problems occur: Reallocate tasks, ensure off board is up to date, suggest alternatives if shortages occur, allocate customers to tables on different stations.

    Importance of keeping customers informed of potential problems: Customer satisfaction, good meal experience, customer understanding, professionalism.

    How to inform customers of problems with service: Professional attitude, appropriate body language, friendly approach, apologise, offer suitable solutions, ask the customer how they would like the problem solved.

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