Visual Spatial Learners in the Gifted Classroom Don’t Tell Me- Show Me!

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    25-Dec-2015

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  • Slide 1
  • Visual Spatial Learners in the Gifted Classroom Dont Tell Me- Show Me!
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  • Underachievement in Gifted Children Learning styles Traditional Teaching Methods
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  • Are you Visual Spatial? Take the Quiz!
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  • 1. Do you think mainly in pictures or words? Geography, globe, continents, countries, oceans, lakes, rivers,
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  • 2. Are you good at solving puzzles or mazes?
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  • 3. Do you like to build with Legos TM, KNEX TM, blocks, etc?
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  • 4. Do you often lose track of time?
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  • 5. Do you know things without being able to tell how or why?
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  • 6. Do you remember how to get to places you have only visited once?
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  • 7. Can you feel what others are feeling?
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  • 8. Do you remember what you see and forget what you hear?
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  • 9. Do you solve problems in unusual ways?
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  • 10. Do you have a wild imagination?
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  • 11. Do you love music, dance, art, or drama?
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  • 12. Can you see things from different perspectives?
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  • 13. Do others think you are organizationally challenged?
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  • 14. Do you love playing on the computer?
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  • 15. Do you have trouble spelling correctly?
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  • 16. Do you like taking things apart to see how they work?
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  • Total up the number of Yeses and Nos. Lets see where you are on the Auditory- Sequential Visual-Spatial Spectrum!
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  • Are you Visual Spatial? 14-16 Yes / 0-2 No - Strongly Visual-Spatial 11-13 Yes / 3-5 No - Moderately Visual-Spatial 9-10 Yes / 6-7 No - Mildly Visual-Spatial 9-10 No / 6-7 Yes - Mildly Auditory-Sequential 11-13 No / 3-5 Yes -Moderately Auditory-Sequential 14-16 No / 0-2 Yes - Strongly Auditory - Spatial
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  • Visual Spatial Learners enjoy: Blocks and Boxes Construx and Legos Gears and Tinker Toys Computers Daydreaming Movies Maps
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  • Visual Spatial Risk Factors Well-above Average intelligence Creative & Divergent Thinkers Physically & Emotionally Sensitive Extreme Visual Spatial Learning Style with Auditory-Sequential Information Processing Weakness
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  • Words Time Step-by-step Trail and Error Progress easy to difficult Details Repetition Pictures Space Whole-to-part Learns all at once Complex=easy; easy=hard Big Picture Learning Sticks Illustrated by Buck Jones, Copyright held by Silverman, Dr. Linda K. 2002. Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual Spatial Learner P1. DeLeon Publishing. May not be reproduced without permission. Auditory-Sequential vs. Visual-Spatial
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  • Phonics Organized Analytical Algebra Chemistry Shows Work Academic Early Bloomer Left Brain Sight Words Organized??? Synthesizer Geometry Physics Intuitive Creative/Technology Late Bloomer Right Brain Auditory-Sequential vs. Visual-Spatial
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  • Auditory - Sequential Visual - Spatial
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  • Why Visual Spatial Abilities? Employers of the 21st century are looking for employees with strong visual skills, able to recognize larger patterns, intuition, a sense of proportion, imaginative vision, able to think outside of the box, and the apt connection between apparently unrelated things. Tom West. In the Minds Eye (1991)
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  • So, why focus on Visual Spatial abilities? Now that information is readily available on the internet success in todays world depends upon intuition, empathy, spirituality, and right-hemispheric directed abilities. In the United States, the number of graphic designers has increased tenfold in a decade; graphic designers outnumber chemical engineers four to one. Since 1970, the United States has 30% more people earning a living as writers and 50% more earning a living by composing or performing music More Americans today work in arts, entertainment, and design than work as lawyers, accountants, and auditors. (p55) Pink, D.H. (2005) A Whole New Mind: Moving from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age
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  • Donna KaranThomas Edison Gloria EstafanRodin Frank Lloyd WrightJackie Robinson Macile Reevis Ansel Adams Spike LeeWalt Disney General George S. PattonSherman Alexie Georgia OKeefe Nikola Tesla Diego RiveraJerry Pinkney Pablo PicassoMichael Faraday Maria TallchiefChris Clarke Leonardo da Vinci Colin Powell Faith RinggoldDenzel Washington Steven SpielbergMichelangelo
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  • Careers for Visual Spatial Learners: navigators, sculptors, visual artists, inventors, architects, interior designers, mechanics, engineers, video game designers, producers, actors, surgeons, dentists, photographers, fashion designers, interior designers, physics, aeronautics, "Intelligence is the ability to find and solve problems and create products of value in one's own culture." -Dr. Howard Gardner
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  • VSLs & Screeners/Aptitude Tests? Aptitude tests - High Scores on Block Design - WISC Comprehension (abstract reasoning)-WISC Abstract Visual Reasoning - SB-IV Matrix Reasoning - WAIS-III Nonverbal sections NNAT Source: Dr. Linda K. Silverman
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  • Constructions Toys Creative Endeavors art, music, drama, dance, Destination Imagination, constructing computer programs, scientific experiments, Enjoy math, science, computers Dream of artistic/scientific fields Look at careers of parents Ear infection history
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  • Learning does not occur in the classroom, it occurs in the students minds. The role of the teacher and the classroom s/he creates is to offer possibilities in such a way that students will both want and be able to learn. The richer the banquet we lay, the more students will partake and the linger they will stay at the table. Williams, L.V. 1983.Teaching for the Two Sided Mind: A guide to Right Brain/Left Brain Education. New York: Simon & Schuster. p194
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  • e Ask yourself, How would I teach this to a deaf child? e Show everything - use Visual Aids e Ask students to visualize pictures, lists, patterns, situations, homework, etc. e Hands-On, Minds-On - use Inquiry with manipulatives e Ask the student if he can make a construct, visualize, or draw of the concept or idea eUse music, fantasy, mnemonics, silly poems, metaphors e Avoid drill and repetition- Have them perform the hardest tasks. e Avoid rote memorization. Use more abstract, conceptual, or inductive approaches.
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  • e Group VSL together for instruction. e Seat in front of room, but 4-6 from chalkboard e Avoid timed tests. e Have them discover their own methods of problem- solving. e Give them advanced, abstract, complex material at a faster pace even if they haven't mastered the easier, sequential work. e Emphasize mastery of higher level concepts rather than perfection of simpler concepts in competition with other students e Use inductive or discover techniques
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  • e Use Color, Color, Color on the visuals e Students use Color highlighters on key concepts, words e Organize EVERYTHING by Color e Color coordinate everything in one subject using the same color. e Have the VSL create Individual flashcards in Color e Copy activity sheets, graphic organizers,study guides, etc. on Color copy paper - easier to organize, too. e Encourage the use of computers eGrade on material learned, not the process.
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  • Illustrated by Buck Jones, Copyright held by Silverman, Dr. Linda K. 2002. Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual Spatial Learner. P88. DeLeon Publishing. May not be reproduced without permission.
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  • May never be a good a good oral reader. Help the child before s/he makes a mistake and it imprints. Encourage the use of context clues. Vocabulary words need illustrations; flash cards Picture collages of words with same beginning / ending, etc. Speed Read- skipping the small words Get content first, then read for details Picture at Punctuation Vision-tracking instrument Test for comprehension with silent reading
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  • Burcher, Sam, Max, and Bryan. 1998. Vocabulary Cartoons. New Monics Books. Burcher, Sam, Max, and Bryan.Vocabulary Cartoons I: SAT Word Power. New Monics Books. Burcher, Sam, Max, and Bryan. 2007. Vocabulary Cartoons II: SAT Word Power. New Monics Books.
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  • http://www.beaverton.k12. or.us/or.us/jacob_wismer/leahy /2005/space/space.htm
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  • MOUNTAIN FI R E WATER
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  • As these students may suffer from deficits in mechanics, give more weight to the content of papers than to format. Give two grades, one for content & one for mechanics Illustrate the story first with a storyboard. Use a graphic organizer to web story, outline, write Dictate story Alternate assignments- birth certificate, tombstone, interviews, maps, role-playing, newspaper article, podcast, etc. Use computers to type stories/reports Encourage handwriting as art
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  • BIRD OUTLINE I. Habitats A. Prairie B. Forest C. Water D. grassland/meadow E. Tundra F. Backyards II. Food A. Seeds B. Fruit D. Mammals E. Reptiles F. Fish and aquatic G. Insects H. Amphibians III.Body Parts A. Feathers 1. Down 2. Primary 3. Secondary 4. Tail 5. Wings B. Camouflage C. Bone structure D. Feet 1. Long, thin toes 2. Webbed 3. Hooked talons 4. Small grasping 5. Thick, sturdy for walking E. Beaks 1. Pouch 2. Sieve 3. Thin needle like 4. Short, thick 5. Long, probing 6. Hooked for tearing IV.Nocturnal A. Owls B. Whippoorwills C. Night Hawks V. Nest Materials and Locations A. Cavities B. Trees C. Ground D. Gravel E. Grass F. Sticks G. Mud H. no nest VI. Migrations A. None B. Within US C. Central & South America D. Other
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  • Illustrated by Buck Jones, Copyright held by Silverman, Dr. Linda K. 2002. Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual Spatial Learner. P93. Deleon Publishing. May not be reproduced without permission.
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  • Use manipulative materials to allow hands-on experience. Avoid timed tests, if possible, and allow them more time for classroom assignments. Times table rhyme stories Let them solve problems their way, if they are getting the correct answers. Let them go on to more complex/harder problem, even if they dont have the simple facts. Dont have them show their work or teach them to work backwards. Use pictures to help illustrate the simple skills.
  • Slide 51
  • Illustrated by Buck Jones, Copyright held by Silverman, Dr. Linda K. 2002. Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual Spatial Learner. P125. DeLeon Publishing. May not be reproduced without permission.
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  • Emphasize creativity, imagination, new insights, new approaches rather than the acquisition of knowledge.. Engage students in independent studies or group projects which involve problem-finding as well as problem-solving. Have the students discuss the ethical, moral and global implications of their learning and involve them in service- oriented projects. Students use illustrations when note-taking If too time consuming, use words and pictures for notes Tape record lectures Highlight information with different colored highlighters Box, circle or underline words to remember Use post-it notes to tag pages and important information Emphasize concepts Allow typed pages to be pasted into Lab books
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  • Slide 54
  • Illustrated by Buck Jones, Copyright held by Silverman, Dr. Linda K. 2002. Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual Spatial Learner. P69. DeLeon Publishing. May not be reproduced without permission.
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  • Horizontal Stacker
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  • Color Code subject areas. Pockets Calendars Computers Visualizing homework before end of school A place for everything and everything in its place
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  • Moment of silence at end of day to visualize homework needs Reduce unpredictable noise Use wait time- allowing students to visualize Let student finish an answer - even if they seem of target Discipline in private and be nonjudgmental. Encourage the childs strengths.
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  • * Lets look at it differently. * See how this works for you. * I cant quite picture it. * Lets draw a diagram or map. * Id like to get a different perspective. * I never forget a face.
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  • The words or the language, as they are written and spoken, do not seem to play any role in my mechanism of thought. The psychical entities which seem to serve as elements in thought are certain signs and images The above mentioned elements are, in my case, of visual and some of muscular type. Conventional words or other signs have to be sought for laboriously in a secondary stage (Albert Einstein, quoted in J. Hadamard, The Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1949.)
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  • Learning in school pushed students through pre-determined hoops in a prescribed way. Spatial ideas give an environment for thinking about relationships. It requires higher level cognition. Dr. Dana Johnson. 2006 NAGC
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  • 2-D to 3-D
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  • 3 Dimensions to 2 Dimensions Project 3-D objects on the overhead projector Cubes: draw from top view, front view, side view TOP VIEWFRONT VIEW RIGHT-SIDE VIEW Source: Dr. Dana Johnson, College of William and Mary
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  • 2 Dimensions to 3 Dimensions Build the structure whose three views are given TOP VIEW FRONT VIEW RIGHT-SIDE VIEW Source: Dr. Dana Johnson, College of William and Mary
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  • What can we do differently in our Gifted classrooms to better meet the needs of the Visual-Spatial Learners, or over half of our classes? What is one thing you will try differently?
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  • Ask yourself these few questions: 1. Am I presenting the material visually? 2. Are there additional maps, charts, graphs, photos, hands-on activities, or other materials I should incorporate? 3. Am I giving students enough time? 4. Are there opportunities for students to demonstrate mastery in visual-spatial friendly ways? 5. Am I successfully differentiating by honoring each student for his or her preferred learning style?
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  • The soul never thinks without a picture. Aristotle, Greek 384-322 B.C. I visualize things in my mind before I have to do them. It is like having a mental workshop. Jack Youngblood, 1950-, American

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