The Library and Information Services (LIS) Transformation ... charter-6th draft...The Library and Information Services (LIS) Transformation Charter ... The Library and Information Services (LIS) Transformation ... that the White Paper ...

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<ul><li><p>The Library and Information Services (LIS) </p><p>Transformation Charter</p><p>July 2009</p><p>6th Draft</p></li><li><p>The Library and Information Services (LIS) </p><p>Transformation Charter</p><p> July 20096th Draft</p><p>Commissioned by the Department of Arts and Culture (DAC) and </p><p>National Council for Library and Information Services (NCLIS)</p><p>The Technical Team:Muxe Nkondo (Chairperson)</p><p>Joe TeffoMary Nassimbeni</p><p>Yonah SeletiArchie Dick</p><p>Genevieve HartAnna Brown</p><p>DAC authorizes you to use, download, copy and distribute this document for educational and non-commercial use only (provided that all copyright and other proprietary notices are retained). The unauthorized display, dis-tribution or use of this document in any other form for commercial purposes is strictly prohibited unless written permission of the DAC is obtained.</p></li><li><p>iv v</p><p>Table of contents</p><p>Preamble ................................................................................................................................................... vi</p><p>Preface ....................................................................................................................................................... vii</p><p>Scope of application: Definitions, abbreviations and acronyms ............................................................................................. x</p><p>Acknowledgements ................................................................................................................................ xvi</p><p>Executive summary .............................................................................................................................. xviii</p><p>Chapter 1 ........................................................................................................................................ page 1Historical and Policy Context; Rationale and Legislative Framework</p><p>Chapter 2 ........................................................................................................................................ page 9Methodology: Reliability, Limitations and Terms of Reference of the Technical Team</p><p>Chapter 3 ...................................................................................................................................... page 13State of the sector and cross-cutting challenges</p><p>Chapter 4 ...................................................................................................................................... page 17Sub-sector analysis: section a) public/community librariessection b) special librariessection c) university librariessection d) national libraries</p><p>Chapter 5 ...................................................................................................................................... page 37School LIS</p><p>Chapter 6 ...................................................................................................................................... page 53expenditure trends</p><p>Chapter 7 ...................................................................................................................................... page 59Human Resources Development: Education and Training and Employment Trends</p><p>Chapter 8 ...................................................................................................................................... page 69Access participation and disability</p><p>Chapter 9 ...................................................................................................................................... page 77Culture of reading</p><p>Chapter 10 .................................................................................................................................... page 81Safeguarding, Preservation and Protection of Library Materials</p><p>Chapter 11 .................................................................................................................................... page 87Framework for the Determination of Minimum National Norms and Standards</p><p>Chapter 12 .................................................................................................................................... page 93Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation</p><p>Appendix l ................................................................................................................................... page 103</p><p>The Call for Action: Key Issues and Recommendations.1. Methodology2. Challenges and Recommendations </p><p>Appendix ll ................................................................................................................................. page 106</p><p>Questions for Library and Information Transformation Charter Public Consultancy List of citations and sources consulted </p></li><li><p>vi vii</p><p>Preamble</p><p>The Parties to the Charter,</p><p> RecallingtheprinciplesproclaimedintheConstitutionoftheRepublicofSouthAfricaandthe Bill of Rights which recognises access to information as a human right,</p><p> RecognisingthattheWhitePaperonArts,CultureandHeritage(1996)establishedacloseconnection between access to information and freedom of speech,</p><p> RecallingthattheEducationLawsandAmendmentActNo.31of2007,liststheavailabilityof the library as a minimal national norm and standard for school infrastructure,</p><p> Notingthatintheinformationageaccesstoinformationisdecisiveandasourceofwealthand power,</p><p> EmphasisingtheimportanceoftheLibraryandInformationServicesSectorasanintegralpart of reconstruction and sustainable development,</p><p> Emphasisingfurthertheimportanceofthesectorinredressinghistoricalinequalities,pov-erty eradication, social cohesion and growing the economy,</p><p> ConcernedthatdespiteattemptsbyGovernmentsincethetransitiontodemocracyin1994, the literacy level and the culture of reading still leave much to be desired by interna-tional standards,</p><p> Mindfulofthefactthatthefutureofthesectorliesinitshumanresourcesandininvestingin peoples capabilities,</p><p> Mindful,further,thatpubliclibrariesformpartofthebiggergoalsofgovernmentpro-grammesincludingprogrammessuchasASGISAandJIPSA,</p><p> ConvincedthatacomprehensiveChartertopromoteanddeveloptheLibraryandInforma-tion Service Sector will make a significant contribution to the development of a just, pros-perous and cohesive society</p><p>PrefaceInApril2008,theNationalCouncilforLibraryandInformationServices(NCLIS),inconsulta-tionwiththeDepartmentofArtsandCulture(DAC),broughttogethersevenpeopletoformtheLibrary and Information Services Transformation Charter Technical Team. They were invited, not as representatives of organizations and institutions, but in their individual and personal capaci-ties.MostofthemarefromtheLibraryandInformationServices(LIS)sectorandhavevariedexperience as academics, practitioners, policy development experts and public officials.</p><p>Their assignment was: to define the challenges facing the sector and to provide a clear frame-work of principles and mechanisms for effecting the changes needed for the sector to contribute totheeliminationofilliteracyandinequality,andbuildaninformedandreadingnation.</p><p>The starting point was the recognition that, in the information age, access to information is crucial and is a source of wealth and power. Access to information makes better people, more efficient and effective workers, and more responsive and responsible citizens. So, rather than considering the library as the site for the training of young elite, we should rethink the library as an institution, as a special place for everybody, as accompanying all South Africans throughout their lives. It should be systematically integrated into the economy and society as the preserver and transmitter of knowledge and information. </p><p>For the majority of people in developing countries the lack of information is the main impedi-ment to their own development. This state of affairs is due not only to scarce material resources, but also to a lack of appreciation of the developmental role which the library and information sector plays. In our opinion there is no more important developmental policy than one oriented towardseradicatinginformationilliteracyandbuildingamodern,efficient,andequitablelibraryand information system. </p><p>BothGovernment,togetherwithitssocialpartners,theprivatesector,civilsocietyorganizations,households and international aid agencies, should support this. It is in the national and global interesttomakeSouthAfricaamoreinformationliteratenation.WhatisclearisthatifGovern-ment does not create the right conditions for the development of the sector, no amount of sup-port from its social partners will succeed in this endeavour. </p><p>The Charters recommendations are based on the careful examination of all the evidence avail-abletoassesswhatisrequiredtoaugmentthesectorscapacitytocontributeinasustainablewaytotheeliminationofinequalityandpoverty.TheTeamconsultedextensivelywithscholars,practitioners, users of services, civil society and political leaders both inside and outside the sec-tor. </p><p>The Team has met individuals and groups from each of the nine provinces. They have received numerous formal submissions and have made a particular effort to engage with both policy implementers and policy beneficiaries. NCLIS is enormously grateful to all the individuals and groups for their contributions. </p></li><li><p>viii ix</p><p>ThefirstdraftwaspresentedtotheMinisterofArtsandCultureinJuly2008,afewdaysbeforehe opened the new building of the National Library in Pretoria. The second draft was presented to the National Summit early in December 2008 for public scrutiny and deliberation. In this the final draft, the Charter is presented in the form of argument and recommendations. The argu-ment is developed under the headings Overview, Challenges and Objectives. This is the basis for action. The elements of the argument and recommendations are designed to serve as a comprehensive but succinct statement of findings.</p><p>Integral parts of this Charter are the analysis and evidence that outline the substance and basis of our recommendations. The special challenges confronting the school library sub sector in all thenineprovincialpublicconsultationsrequiremuchmorecomprehensiveanddetailedanaly-sis. The Charter will be available in English on DACs website. Suggestions for further reading and deliberation appear at the end of the Charter. </p><p>TheCharterspeakstodiverseaudiences:decision-makersinGovernmentwhomustdrivefor-ward the program of transformation of the people as set out in the Bill of Rights and the Recon-structionandDevelopmentProgram(RDP);therichandtheeducatedeliteofoursocietywhomusttakeastrongleadforactioninpartnershipwithGovernment;internationalaidagencies,whichmustassistGovernmentinitscommitmentforgreateractionontheMillenniumDe-velopmentGoals.ItisaddressedtoallthecitizensofSouthAfrica.ItisSouthAfricancitizenswhomustdemandactionandwhosevoiceswilldeterminewhetherGovernmenttakesstrong,prompt and sustained action. </p><p>The recommendations proposed constitute a coherent plan for South Africa. They should be implemented together as aspects of the same organic vision. 2009 is the year of our fourth democratic elections and just six years before the target year for the Millennium Development Goalstohalvepovertyanderadicateilliteracyby2015.Itistheyeartotakedecisionsthatwilldemonstrate our resolve to turn the vision of an informed and reading nation into a reality. </p><p>There are difficulties to be contended with. The difficulties facing the effort to build an informed andreadingnationarenotcontingentormechanistic,noraretheyquestionsofinstitutionalengineering. They are of a deeper nature. Our starting point in addressing them relates back to some of the key factors in the crisis of our democracy referred to in the Macro-Social Trends Report (2004),inparticularthespreadofmoraldegeneration,povertyandpassivitywhichhasbeen prevalent amongst our people.</p><p>In analysing the causes of this condition and what can be done about it, it is necessary to say something, however briefly, about social trends in the last fifteen years. Although they do not all point in the same direction, they cannot be said to have helped to make our democracy more vitalormorepresentinpeopleslives.Whatisdeeplyworryingisthattherearealltoofewpublicspacesforandprocessesofeducationandtrainingininformationliteracy.Consequentlythere are all too few public spaces for and processes of informed discussion and participation in decision-making. Most citizens are either uninformed or privatised in their habits, thoughts and daily practices.</p><p>Whileitiscertainlytruethataccesstoeducationhasbeenwidenedandthattheinternetandmany other instruments are democratising access to information, the largest single cultural in-fluence on families, especially the upper classes, remains the television. The oligarchic structure and conformist tendencies of national and global television have the effect of inhibiting the solid transmission of democratic and participative values. Thus, highly focused strategies for eradicat-ing illiteracy and building an information literate citizenry are urgent. The best strategies com-bine step-by-step implementation and monitoring plans with an integrated body of knowledge across disciplinary boundaries. Using this framework to inform action plans on the ground and organizing the feedback of implementation would result in an integrated body of knowledge.</p></li><li><p>x xi</p><p>Definitions, abbreviations and acronymsACE Advanced Certificate in Education</p><p>ASGISA AcceleratedandSharedGrowthInitiativeforSouthAfrica</p><p>CEPD Continuing Education for Professional Development</p><p>CHELSA Committee for Higher Education Librarians in South Africa</p><p>CICD Centre for Information Career Development</p><p>DAC Department of Arts and Culture</p><p>DoE Department of Education</p><p>DPSA Department of Public Service and Administration</p><p>ELITS Education Library Information and Technology Services</p><p>ETQA Education and Training Quality Assurance</p><p>GDP Grossdomesticproduct</p><p>HESA Higher Education South Africa</p><p>HOD Head of Department</p><p>HSRC Human Sciences Research Council </p><p>ICT Information and Communication Technology</p><p>IFAP Information for All Programme</p><p>IFLA International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions</p><p>ISASA Independent Schools Association of South Africa</p><p>ISO International Standards Organisation</p><p>JIPSA JointInitiativeforPrioritySkillsAcquisition</p><p>KZN KwaZulu-Natal Province</p><p>LIASA Library and Information Association of South Africa</p><p>LIS Library and Information Services</p><p>LISLIG LIASASpecialLibrariesInterestGroup</p><p>LTSM Learning and Teaching Support Materials</p><p>MTEF Medium-Term Expenditure Framework</p><p>NCLIS National Council for Library and Information Services</p><p>NEIMS National Education Infrastructure Management System</p><p>NLPF National Language Policy Framework</p><p>NLSA National Library of South Africa</p><p>NQF National Qualifications Framework</p><p>OBE Outcomes-based education</p><p>OSALL Organisation of South African Law Libraries</p><p>PIRLS Progress in International Reading Literacy Study</p><p>RDP Reconstruction and Development Programme</p><p>SAOUG SouthernAfricanOnlineUserGroup</p><p>SAQA South African Qualifications Authority </p><p>SGB StandardsGeneratingBody</p><p>SLIS Special Libraries and Information Services</p><p>SLYSIG SchoolLibraryandYouthServicesInt...</p></li></ul>

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