The Healthy Living Kitchen: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Heart Smart Cooking

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  • Title: THE HEALTHY LIVING KITCHEN: ANINTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO HEART SMARTCOOKING

    Author(s): V. L. Turner, J. E. Seiber; Nutrition and FoodServices, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN

    Learning Outcome: To describe the successful implementationof an interdisciplinary heart healthy cooking program.

    Text: Tennessee has the 9th highest rate of obesity in America (1).The increase incidence of obesity is strongly correlated to an increaserisk for cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes.

    The University of Tennessee Medical Center (UTMC) hasestablished five centers of excellence. The Heart Lung VascularInstitute (HLVI), in response to patients and community needs forsimple heart healthy cooking techniques, established the HealthyLiving Kitchen (HLK). The HLK staff includes: a registereddietitian, a cardiac nurse specialist, and an executive chef. Theinterdisciplinary team provides participants with cookingdemonstrations, recipe tips, and healthy lifestyle education.

    Class size is limited to 30 participants with a $20 registration fee. Aclass is offered each quarter. One of the most successful classes hasbeen Tailgating 4 Your Heart which received local and nationalmedia attention. The HLK staff makes regular appearances on twolocal affiliate television stations to present mini-demonstrations. TheHLK is a positive, interactive and well received community educationprogram. In 2008, the HLK plans to expand the program to includemany of the Medical Centers corporate wellness partners. The HLKwill launch a corporate sponsorship with a regional grocery retailer toprovide food supplies, program marketing and a series of groceryshopping tours.

    The Healthy Living Kitchen demonstrates the success of aninterdisciplinary approach to healthy lifestyle education.

    1. http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/trend/maps/index.htm

    Funding Disclosure: None

    Title: INTENSIVE TRAINING IMPROVES DIETETIC INTERNSSKILLS, CONFIDENCE, AND INTENT TO USE RELATED TOMOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING

    Author(s): M. Madson,1 E. F. Molaison,2 W. E. Bounds2;1Psychology, The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg,MS, 2Nutrition & Food Systems, The University of SouthernMississippi, Hattiesburg, MS

    Learning Outcome: Learners will identify the effects of intensivetraining in motivational interviewing (MI) on dietetic internsknowledge, skills, confidence, and intention to use related to MI.

    Text: Motivational interviewing (MI) is client-centered counselingthat encourages behavior change by exploring and resolvingambivalence related to change. MI approaches have been shown to beeffective in a number of dietary interventions, but many nutritionprofessionals may have had inadequate training in MI techniques.Fifteen dietetic interns took part in 16 hours of training over 6weeks. The training provided an overview of the major tenants andspecific skills related to MI. Training included didactic information,experiential exercises, and coaching on the implementation of MI.Knowledge and attitudes, self-confidence, skills, and intention to userelated to MI were measured before and after the training. At pre-test, the majority of the interns answered at least 75% of the itemscorrectly, demonstrating good knowledge of MI. Post training,knowledge improved slightly. Overall, means for self confidence in MIimproved at post test for 14 of the 18 items assessed. Internsindicated they were more likely to use MI at the post-test, with lowerscores reported for 12 of the 13 items (suggesting a greater likelihoodof using MI). When assessing skills (i.e. reflective listening,responding to resistance, developing discrepancy, etc.) mean scoreswere significantly higher at post-test. Although there was nosignificant difference on knowledge of MI after training, confidenceand willingness to use MI and skills related to MI were significantlyhigher after the training. Therefore, providing intensive training inMI to dietetic interns allows an opportunity to build their skills andconfidence in the use of emerging nutrition counseling techniques.

    Funding Disclosure: None

    Title: SUSTAINABLE NUTRITION EDUCATION PROGRAM INMALAWI

    Author(s): C. Fields-Gardner,1 M. E. Schmitz,1 M. Lichtenberg,2S. M. Ward3; 1TCE Consulting Group, Cary, IL, 2Planet Aid-HumanaPeople to People, Murgwi Estate, Zimbabwe, 3WISHH, Washington,DC

    Learning Outcome: Describe two strategies for sustainablenutrition education programs.

    Text: As food security improves with a growing agricultural economyin Malawi, nutrition education and food choices become importantfeatures health programming. Needs assessments revealed that lackof nutrition knowledge and poor food choices may contribute tocontinuing malnutrition. Institutionalization of nutrition educationthat progresses from food and nutrition basics to disease-relatedmanagement was the goal of this three-year program in Malawissouthern region. Train-the-trainer modules were developed andtested. Fifteen student teacher trainers trained 135 peers and 16community educator trainers trained 200 peers. Topics progressedfrom basic to more complex, including basic nutrition, hygiene,lifecycle nutrition, guidelines, disease, impact measurement, andtherapeutic nutrition. The program included ongoing needs/resourcesassessments, appendices (learning theory, community educationactivities), and monitoring/evaluation programs. Evaluation includedchanges from pre- to post-tests responses. Trainers were givenresponsibility to ensure that all their learners achieved 100%accuracy to obtain a Certificate of Completion for each module.Nutrition messages were synthesized by the participants after eachmodule and integrated into their community nutrition educationprograms. Progressively improved knowledge and training skills wereseen in trainers and improved knowledge was seen in studentteacher and community educator learners in each of the modulesthrough pre/post tests, evaluation surveys, and observation. Thetested module materials, computerized monitoring and evaluationprogram, and reports were integrated into printed and electronicformat kits. A master CD was included to allow adaption, updating,and expansion of the program to additional target populations.

    Funding Disclosure: USDA Food for Progress

    TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTIONS: STRATEGIES FOR LIFESTYLE CHANGES (PART 4): HEART HEALTH AND MORE

    Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION / A-85

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