• Vol. 12/Number 49 www.myharrisonreport.com December 7, 2012 Master Plan process extended By DANIEL OFFNER STAFF REPORTER dan@hometwn.com The members of the Harrison Town Council have decided to defer approving a new town/village mas- ter plan and continue to hear public comment on the document until, at least, the board’s next meeting. “There is still major work that needs to be done here,” said Councilman Joseph Cannella, a Republican. During a Dec. 3 meeting of the Town Council, residents expressed concerns over the ambiguity of sev- eral proposals put forth in the plan, which was drafted by consultants at BFJ Planning. The draft suggests an increase to property lot requirements in the two-family zone, rehashing a con- troversial proposal that has been the result of an ongoing battle to alter the zoning regulations within the two-family residential “B” zone. The increase would allow for new development, but restricts the 1,500 existing two-family properties to non-conforming status. This means the existing property could remain at the current 5,000 square foot lot requirement, but in the event of a disaster or major modification, a home would have to be rebuilt in a manner conforming to the new code or seek a variance. Downtown resident Anthony Marella said that changing the mini- mum lot requirements, as per the suggestion of the plan would have a substantial impact to the value of all two-family residential properties. “This would cause hardship to anyone who owns any of these homes,” Marella said. “Please leave our B-Zone homes alone.” Marella went on to suggest that the council consider a system of parking permits for residents within in the B-Zone as an alternative, which would allow the town to limit the number of cars parked alongside two-family homes. In addition to the lot require- ments, the consultants with BFJ have also proposed rezoning a portion of Oakland Avenue–spe- cifically between Grant and Park avenues–to commercial. Another contentious proposal to re- PLAN continued on page 8 The September 2012 proposed master plan draft remains in limbo until details are ironed out with planning consultants. A public hearing on the non-binding zoning and development guidebook will continue on Dec. 20. Contributed photo 2013 budget avoids cuts to service By DANIEL OFFNER STAFF REPORTER dan@hometwn.com Municipal department heads are pleading that the members of the Harrison Town Council reconsider restoring staffing levels in the 2013 budget. But while members of the Town Council mull over a proposed $56 million spending plan, they opened the floor to suggestions from the departments on how to maintain services while limiting spending increases next year. Currently, the council’s proposal shows no cuts in municipal services while salaries for town employees have remained flat from last year. Commissioner of the Public Works Department Anthony Robinson suggested that the town reinstate a few items back into the budget, including three new hires and three promotions costing an additional $95,000 that was previ- ously unbudgeted for. According to Robinson, the department could see savings if the town eliminated one of their sanitation programs cur- rently in use. "This would put some of our guys back in the available pool," Robinson said. Restructuring the commercial property pickup could “find” the budgeting money to allow for the extra hires and promotions, he said. Building Inspector Robert FitzSimmons stated that in addi- tion to a significant amount of per- mit fees for construction projects including for a Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital and LifeTime Fitness, the department had a sur- plus of $100,000 in revenue. "We have two major projects on- going with a few more coming up next year," FitzSimmons said. Due to a lack of manpower, FitzSimmons has requested the council consider allocating some of the surplus revenue toward hiring a new person, either on a per diem or contractual basis, to remain on site of one of the larger-scale projects scheduled for next year. Earlier this year, the police de- partment hired five new patrolmen under new PBA union contracts that would reduce the salaries for new hires by 10 percent from their predecessors. Police Chief Anthony Marraccini urged the council to keep the three additional staff hires already listed in the budget, with the ultimate goal of approaching the department’s former roster of more than 70 employees. Hiring new staff would boost the 61 members currently on the force to a total of 64, increasing police salaries by a nominal $155,000 next year. "We've been stripped down to the bare minimum...at times, we don't have enough police cars in service," Marraccini said during a public hearing on Dec. 3. "Unfortunately, Harrison is not immune to criminal activity." According to Marraccini, the budget additionally left important department programs by the way- side, including the youth bureau and the need for a school resource officer. Although the current budget shows a slight surplus in police revenues that could contribute to the cost for new hires, the town plans on spending $1.4 million in overtime SERVICES continued on page 4
  • 2 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 3 New Laundromat set to open downtown By DANIEL OFFNER STAFF REPORTER dan@hometwn.com Harrison’s downtown will soon become awash with change. A new Laundromat com- ing to downtown Harrison is being embraced by residents in the area, but the owner of an existing Laundromat feels the competition could put his business through the spin cycle. During the past half-century, it has been an uphill struggle to revamp Harrison’s down- town business district and attract new retail businesses, as an abundance of vacant store- fronts and a lack of foot traffic on the strip has plagued the area. Harrison Police Lt. Michael Olsey found that the vacant one-story property, formerly occupied by the New York Dance Academy, was prime real estate to open a business. “I saw the empty storefront and had been kicking the idea around for a while,” Olsey said. “I thought it would be ideal for a Laundromat.” Olsey said he plans on investing roughly $750,000 to create a new coin-operated wash- and-fold Laundromat that would include drop-off service and 20 new energy efficient machines. Following a public hearing on Dec. 3, members of the Harrison Town Council unan- imously voted to approve the construction at 222 Harrison Ave. But for Jamie Vintimilla, who owns the Harrison Laundry Station on Halstead Avenue–the town’s only Laundromat–said that officials had not informed him of the pro- posal, which would be less then a block away from his business. “I don’t think it’s fair,” said Vintimilla. “At this point, I don’t know what to do.” According to Vintimilla, he previously had approached the town four years ago to apply for a new location, but was denied because the law would not permit him to build another Laundromat downtown. Currently, there are more than four dry cleaners in the downtown business district and only one Laundromat. Although there are sev- eral options to wash and dry clothes in neigh- boring municipalities, some residents feel that having a larger facility closer to home would be more convenient. Harrison resident Maria Coronel said that several times the existing Laundromat on Halstead became so crowded that people would just have to stand around and wait. “Some days there are so many people that have to wait for a dryer,” said Coronel, 35. “And it’s too expensive to use the machines.” Resident James Nochec, who lives atop the Laundromat downtown, said that on days when the Laundromat gets crowded people are left with no amenities other than to sit and wait for their chance to use a machine. “Everybody wants a new Laundromat… we don’t have anybody else in town,” said Nochec, 49. “I had to go to Port Chester to do my laundry.” Former Chamber of Commerce President Ada Angarano explained that while she can understand the need for more machines, she would have hoped for a retail store. “This is not going to help bring customers to the town,” Anagarano said. A sign inside of 222 Harrison Ave., a site where Michael Olsey has proposed to construct a new Laundromat. Photo/Daniel Offner
  • 4 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 Community Briefs Volunteers needed for SPRYE SPRYE (Staying Put in Rye and Environs, Rye, Port Chester, Harrison and Rye Brook) helps older adults remain connected to their community and able to remain in their homes as they age. One of the services the organi- zation provides is transportation to medical appointments, shopping and other essential errands. SPRYE is currently in need of vol- unteer drivers; even a two hour a week com- mitment will provide a round trip ride for one of the members. For more information, call (914) 481-5706. Help the GNC aid families in need The Greenburgh Nature Center is working with Open Door Foundation to ensure that children from families of less fortunate means receive a brand new toy or gift this holiday season. Donate a new toy or gift (unwrapped) for children (ages newborn to 14 years old). Drop off your unwrapped gift at the GNC Manor House between Nov. 24 – Dec. 17 (closed fridays). All of the toys will be distrib- uted to young patients of Open Door Family Medical Centers. Toy/gift value should be $10-$20 each. For more information about the Open Door Foundation, visit opendoormedical.org. Harrison resident, tennis pro offers adult tennis program this fall Jeffrey Greene, longtime Westchester resi- dent, successful college tennis coach, highly- ranked USTA Eastern Section Senior Men’s veteran tournament competitor and current director of tennis at Camp Pennigewassett in New Hampshire, will be offering an adult tennis program on weekends this fall. Classes will be held on Saturday and Sunday morn- ings at Harrison High School and will con- tinue through the end of November. To register, please go to the Solazzo Center, located at 270 Harrison Ave. (opposite the train station) or for additional information, call the Harrison Recreation Office at (914) 670-3179 for further details. Events at the Harrison Public Library, Bruce Avenue Dec. 10, 17 and 24 at 10:30 a.m. Storyland, ages 3 to 5 (siblings welcome) Dec. 10 and 17 at 4 p.m. Board games for all ages. Dec. 10 at 3:30 p.m. Legos at the library Ages 5 and up Come build a holiday themed creation. Dec. 12 and 19 at 10 a.m. and again at 11 a.m. Circle Time for Tots Songs and stories for the little ones with Miss Claudia. Dec. 13 at 10:30 and 11 a.m. Wiggle & Giggle with Dawny Dew Ages 1 – 6 Come celebrate the season with fun holiday songs. For more information on events at the li- brary, call (914) 835-0324 “Performathon 2012” comes to the Music Conservatory of Westchester The Music Conservatory of Westchester, a nonprofit community music school with students and faculty from throughout the region, has partnered with The Digital Arts Experience, a digital media arts instruction facility in downtown White Plains, to bring “Performathon 2012” to music lovers through- out the region on Dec. 8. Held once every two years, Performathon is an all-day marathon of more than 150 musical performances that also includes a holiday gift boutique and an array of gourmet foods from around the world. Performathon 2012 takes place from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. at the Music Conservatory of Westchester, located at 216 Central Ave. in White Plains, and is free and open to the public. The event kicks off with a faculty jazz concert starting at 6:30 p.m. on Dec. 7 at The Digital Arts Experience, located at 170 Hamilton Ave. in White Plains. Concert by Westchester Chorale On Dec. 8, the Westchester Chorale will present its holiday choral concert featuring Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Cantata 140” and Camille Saint-Saëns’ “Oratorio de Noël.” The 50 singers of the Westchester Chorale will be accompanied by full orchestra, including several Larchmont-area musicians. Directed by Douglas Kostner, the concert will also feature renowned harpist Grace Clouthier. The concert will take place at 4 p.m. at the Larchmont Avenue Church, located at 60 Forest Park Ave. in Larchmont. For more information, call (914) 237-9546, email info@westchesterchorale.org, or visit west- chesterchorale.org. Tickets are available at the door or via website: $25/general admission; $20/seniors; and $10/students. White Plains resident hosts Music for Parkinson’s concert White Plains resident David Eger is bringing local musicians together to fight Parkinson’s disease at the 10th annual Music for Parkinson’s concert, with a goal of raising $50,000 for research. The concert will take place from 3:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. on Dec. 9 at the Dunn Performing Arts Center, located at Rye Country Day School in Rye. The Music for Parkinson’s concert typi- cally draws over 150 people and has raised more than $400,000 for Parkinson’s research since its inception. This year’s program will feature performances by premier musicians such as the Attacca Quartet, an internation- ally acclaimed ensemble; pianist Gena Raps, a Julliard graduate and faculty member at The New School; and John Stine, one of the event’s co-founders and principal clarinetist of the St. Thomas Chamber Music Players. Guests are invited to a wine and cheese reception with the musicians following the concert. To purchase tickets for Music for Parkinson’s, visit pdf.org/en/music. For more information, call (800) 457-6676, email info@pdf.org or visit pdf.org. Choral singers needed for Taconic Opera Taconic Opera invites choral singers to participate in the world premiere performance and professional recording of the oratorio “Enoch” by the company’s General and Artistic Director, Dan Montez. The work will feature the Taconic Opera chorus, profes- sional lead singers and full orchestra. All voice parts are welcome and no dues are required. Membership for experienced choristers will not require an audition. Scores will be available at a reduced price at rehears- als for $20, but they also can be purchased through amazon.com. The company will be presenting two per- formances of the oratorio in two locations: March 2, 2013, at 7:30 p.m. at the Ossining United Methodist Church; and March 3, 2013 at 3 p.m. at the White Plains Presbyterian Church. Rehearsals will continue on Wednesdays from 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. and Saturdays from 3 p.m. -5 p.m., with time off for the December holidays. The rehearsal location is the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, located at 801 Kitchawan Road (Route 134, between Taconic Parkway and Route 100) in Ossining (border of Yorktown). A dress rehearsal with leads and orchestra is scheduled for March 1, 2013 at 7 p.m. at the Ossining United Methodist Church. For more information, contact divamaryc@aol.com or call (914) 649-1826. Deadline for our Community Briefs section is every Friday at 12 p.m. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accom- modate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com. costs for police services. For the members of the Library Board of Trustees, the budget process has been difficult as it make necessary cuts to meet the threshold of 2 percent cap. Library officials requested the town tap into reserve funds to the tune of $215,000 to hire a full-time cleaner and technical support, but the Town Council seemed unwilling to move. "There are no free lunches any- more," said Republican Councilman Joe Cannella. Currently, the $56 million budget has not been adjusted with the exception of the police department who have allo- cated funding for three new officers in 2013. Because the Westchester County Police Academy runs only January and August, the police are staving off the hires until the next session. As dictated by law, members of the Harrison Town Council have until Dec. 20 to adopt the budget. SERVICES from page 1
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 5 Tele-town hall event draws 31,000 listeners Police nab credit card theft suspect More than 31,000 residents were on the line Nov. 28 to join Republican County Executive Robert P. Astorino for his fifth tele-town hall. Over the course of the town hall, which ran from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Astorino and constitu- ents discussed a wide range of topics that in- cluded the 2013 proposed budget, Playland, day care, Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, the federal housing settlement, health care, unfunded mandates and more. “One of the challenges we have in govern- ment is keeping residents informed,” Astorino said. “I really enjoy these tele-town halls be- cause they reach a lot of people but we can also talk to people one-on-one and answer their specific questions.” The proposed budget was a key topic as Astorino talked about the tough balance of delivering services while not raising taxes for the third year in a row. There was time for lighter conversation as well. Astorino asked each of the 16 callers during the hour what their favorite band was. Responses included Sinatra, Springsteen, Glen Miller, ACDC, and even Justin Bieber. Those who participated were either ran- domly called moments before the start of the event or they themselves called in directly to a phone number that had been widely publi- cized. The average time on the line of each caller was 12 minutes; the industry standard is eight minutes. Others participated via Facebook and Twitter. A recording of the tele- town hall is available at westchestergov.com. In addition, approximately 1,000 listeners responded to a poll question on the topic, “Do you think all county employees should pay a portion of the cost of their health care ben- efits?” Ninety-one percent said yes; 9 percent said no. (Submitted) County Executive Robert P. Astorino takes calls from the public during his tele-town hall meeting that drew more than 31,000 listeners. Contributed photo Harrison police arrested a man and charged him in conjunction with the theft of credit cards taken out of cars parked at Harrison Avenue School last month. John Francis Clark, 49, of Paramus N.J, was arrested outside of CVS on Halstead Avenue in Harrison on Dec. 3, and charged with two counts of grand larceny, a felony. Police Lt. Edward Lucas said the suspect is believed to have purchased $600 worth of American Express gift cards using credit cards that had been reported stolen on Nov. 16 and Nov. 21 from the parking lot of the Harrison Avenue School. Police were tracking stolen cards when one was used by Clark, who was arrested upon exiting the store. “We apprehended him at CVS immediately after he had made a purchase using one of the [stolen] cards,” Lucas said. Rye Police were notified of the arrest by Harrison Police due to the fact that munici- pality is investigating similar incidents within its borders. Credit card thefts are believed to have occurred Monday in the vicinity of Resurrection School and the Presbyterian Nursery School during afternoon dismissal, according to Rye Police Commissioner William Connors. Both schools are located on Boston Post Road near Rye High School. Connors said Rye hasn’t had any reported victims to date. However, he has received a few phone calls from residents and detectives are investigating. The suspect would see an unlocked car with a purse in it and then grab a credit card from inside, the commissioner said. Connors said there was no broken glass or forced entry to alert people. “It appears what he was doing was working his way in with the crowd at school pickup” the commissioner said. -Reporting by CHRISTIAN FALCONE and DANIEL OFFNER John Francis Clark was arrested on Monday in connection with a rash of stolen credit cards. Photo courtesy/Harrison Police Department
  • 6 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 Model Congress heads to capitol The Harrison High School Model Congress team competed at the Princeton Model Congress Conference in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 16-19 and collected 10 awards and a visit to the White House. Over 800 students from all over the country took place in this prestigious event. Harrison High School was the only public high school among the top five in conten- tion for the best/outstanding delegation award–an award Harrison won last year–and the only school without a model congress, speech or debate program as an academic class. After graduating 12 seniors in the Class of 2012, advisors Laryca Makarczuk and Meghan Orban expected this year to be one of rebuilding and strengthening. They were gobsmacked by the 10 awards the students received in Washington, even after two of the team’s strongest seniors were unable to attend as a result of SAT rescheduling conflicts. Freshman Catie DiRe’s bill, An Act to Abolish Drone Attacks, was passed in committee, in full session and signed into law by the president of the Princeton Model Congress. The Princeton Model Congress bestowed awards on: Rajan Mehra (co-president- 12th grade) – GAVEL Thomas Lovinger (co-president – 12th grade) – GAVEL and honorable mention Hunter Sable (11th grade) – GAVEL Ben Adler (11th grade) – honorable mention Sam Coangelo (11th grade) – honorable mention Aaron Kaplan (11th grade) – honorable mention Liliane Lindsay (11th grade) – honorable mention Daniel Maldonado (11th grade) – honorable mention Harrison Steins (10th grade) – honorable mention (Submitted) Harrison High School Model Congress poses in front of the White House gates. The group went on to win 10 awards at the Princeton Model Congress Conference in Washington, D.C. last month. Contributed photo NRHS alum host toy drive for Sandy victims The New Rochelle High School Class of 2003, in conjunction with the New Rochelle High School Class of 2013 Honor Society and G.O., is sponsoring the “Queen City of the Sound Hearts Queens” holiday toy drive to benefit the children of Breezy Point who have been af- fected by Hurricane Sandy. The drive is being sponsored with the help of Virginia’s House of Hope–a nonprofit organiza- tion based in New York City dedicated to helping needy children throughout the boroughs. All gifts should be new, unwrapped and appropriate for children ages 4-14. Pick-up date for toys will be Dec. 20. Toys will be delivered to Blessed Trinity Parish in Breezy Point Dec. 22. Drop-off locations: New Rochelle Public Library 1 Library Plaza In the Community Gallery during regular library hours New Rochelle High School 265 Clove Road Room 226 8 a.m. – 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. For more information about the toy drive and/or volunteer opportunities, email Deputy Editor Rachel McCain at NRHS2003@gmail.com. For more information on Virginia’s House of Hope, visit Virginiashouseofhope.org.
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 7 Mark Lungariello LUNGARIELLO AT LARGE Age polarization, continued In this space last week, I said the increasing gap between the fi nancial well-being of young and old Americans could be attributed only partly to the housing market collapse and a lack of equity for re- cent home buyers. But the housing collapse is only one factor in the age polarization in America. The increasing cost of college education may be having a ripple effect over the economic well- being of recent graduates. According to the John William Pope Center for Higher Education, the average debt for a graduating senior in 2007 was $23,200, which was a 24 percent increase from just 2004. Outstanding college loans now outnumber countrywide credit card debt. Poll data suggests that debt from tuition has affected career choices and staved off major purchases and even marriage for a number of recent graduates. The prospect of paying off those loans without the salary to cover monthly payments is a reality for the younger generation. According to a recent Pew Research Center study, for households headed by someone under 35, the median adjusted annual income in 1967 was $38,555, compared with $49,145 in 2010. That’s a 27 percent increase. Meanwhile, for households headed by someone over 65, the me- dian adjusted annual income in 1967 was $20,804, compared with $43,401 in 2010. That’s a 109 per- cent increase. The two trends heading in opposite directions suggests that there is more than the poor economy at play. An independent trend that is also increasing the gap of age-based well-being is the polarization of the U.S. job market. Simply put, low-skill service jobs have grown since the 1980s as computers and technology replaced specialized labor posi- tions. A study by David H. Autor and David Dorn in April 2012 focused on the growth of low skill service jobs. “Our results suggest a critical role for changes in labor specialization, spurred by the automation of routine task activities, as a driver of rising unemployment and wage polarization in the U.S. and potentially in other countries,” the paper stated. How the divide is, or can be, shaping the political landscape is an intriguing question. It is now com- monly known that Barack Obama won re-election with the highest unemployment rate–nearly 8 per- cent–of any candidate since the Great Depression. Pundits and political analysts have focused on the divergent voting trends of groups by ethnicity or sex. Non-white voters overwhelmingly favored Obama, while the shrinking white vote swung heavily for Obama’s opponent, Mitt Romney. The female vote also went heavily Democratic. But the youth vote is also shaping the popu- lar view of politics. There is a strong argument to be made that the youth vote swung highly in Obama’s favor not due to liberal social policies but because of a growing pro-government mindset. Paul Taylor, the executive vice president of Pew Research Center, told Andrew Benedict-Nelson of Insight Labs that there was a 34-percentage-point difference in 2008 between how 18-to-29 year olds voted and how 65-and-overs voted. “As recently as 10 years ago, there was no dif- ference between those two cohorts,” Taylor said, according to Benedict-Nelson. “So something very profound has happened.” Taylor said that in his center’s studies, researchers found “the parti- san age gap is bigger than it’s ever been.” The turnout gap between old and young vot- ers is shrinking. Traditionally, younger voters do not vote en masse and it is a former truism that younger voters are often leery of party affi liations and politics in general. The mammoth turnout in 2008 and a large showing in 2012 suggested that the youth vote is increasingly engaged in political parties and turning out in much greater favor be- hind the Obama administration and its policies. Young voters were more likely to vote Republican in 2012 than 2008, but still swung overwhelmingly Democrat. Voters aged 18 to 29 voted 60 percent to 30 percent in favor of Barack Obama, according to Washington Post exit polls. The young vote made up about 18 percent of the overall electorate and the 23 percent margin of victory among those under 30 years old was near- ly as signifi cant as the margin of defeat among voters in the 65 and above age group. The number was down from the 68-32 percent Democratic-Republican margin in 2008, but still represented a contrast when compared to voters of older age groups, who split closer to the 50 percent mark in the 30-to-44 demographic. Republican candidate Mitt Romney won the won among the 45-to-64 and 65-plus age groups. Although Obama, and Kerry before him, had strong showings in the range of 60 percent with the young vote, the under-30 crowd has not been a sure thing in terms of voting blue. In the 2000 election, the vote was split, with George W. Bush and Al Gore receiving 47 percent each (Ralph Nader received 6 percent). Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, in his fi rst election, had strong support among the youth vote, according to Gallup. The age divide may be the trickledown from the continued wage polarization in the country. According to Emmanuel Saez, in his March 2, 2012 piece entitled “Striking it Richer,” real income growth between 1993 to 2010 was 13.8 percent, but was 58 percent for the top 1 percent of incomes and just 6.4 percent for the bottom 99 percent of earners. Top earners had an 11.6 percent real income growth since the 2009-2010 economic recovery, while the bottom 99 percent rebounded a meager 0.2 percent. The overall wage increase is absorbed by such a small percentage of the population that effectively, the 99 percent are falling further and further behind the pace. Age polarization also seems to be widening the racial gap. According to the most recent job num- bers, there was a 21.4 percent unemployment rate among blacks aged 18 to 29, and a 13.4 percent unemployment rate among Hispanics aged 18 to 29. The number was well above the 12 percent unemployment rate for young workers in general, and jarringly higher than the 8 percent national unemployment rate. Reach Mark Lungariello at mark@hometwn.com.
  • 8 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 Mayor talks Sandy relief, town events Mayor Ron Belmont HARRISON HAPPENINGS In an effort to help communities hardest hit by Hurricane Sandy Harrison sixth grader, Faith Fuerst is collecting new and gently used books to donate to an elementary school in Freeport, Long Island. As Faith watched news coverage, of communities ravaged by the devastating effects of the storm, she began thinking of all the school libraries that were damaged. Faith loves to read and decided that she could help others, who enjoy read- ing, by facilitating a book drive. Books can be dropped off at the Harrison libraries or at Louis M. Klein Middle School. Harrison Youth Council is seeking new board members with specifi c skills. The Youth Council provides educational prevention pro- grams, parent support groups, presentations and professional support through individual, family and group counseling, as well as con- sultation and referral for families within the Harrison community. If you would like to serve the community by giving your time and expertise, and you have skills in the areas of public relations, de- velopment, or fi nancial management, please send your résumè to Lori Wilson, Board President via email wilsonlj@mac.com or by mail to Lori Wilson, Harrison Youth Council, 84 Calvert St., Harrison, N.Y. 10528. The Harrison Public Library will be hosting a variety of family program for the holiday sea- son. On Dec. 18, “movie time at the library” will begin at 3:30 p.m. with a children’s holi- day movie. Hot cocoa and homemade cookies will be served. A holiday craft program will be offered on Dec. 20 at 4 p.m. and on Dec. 26 at 10:30 a.m. For additional information, log on to harrisonpl.org. On a related note, the West Harrison Christmas tree lighting and holiday celebra- tion will be held on Friday evening at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 7, with a rain date of Dec 9. I would like to take this opportunity to up- date residents on storm damage relief options. The U.S. Small Business Administration, Offi ce of Disaster Assistance is currently working to make sure that Hurricane Sandy survivors are aware of the SBA disaster loan program. SBA offers federal disaster loans to homeowners and renters for disaster related losses. Individuals, unable to qualify for an SBAS loan, may be referred to FEMA for ad- ditional grant assistance. Survivors should fi rst register with FEMA by calling 1-800-621-3362 or 1-800-621-FEMA. People affected by Hurricane Sandy can reg- ister or get help online at DisasterAssistance. gov or they may visit any disaster recovery center. There is currently a disaster recovery cen- ter at the Westchester County Center at 198 Central Ave. in White Plains, N.Y. 10606. Staff is available at the center to answer ques- tions or assist with completing an SBA disas- ter loan application. Additional details on the locations of Disaster Recovery Centers and the loan application process can be obtained by calling the SBA Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 (800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing) or by sending an email to disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Loan applications can be downloaded from sba. gov. Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, Texas 76155. zone arose last year when inspectors with the town Building Department issued violations for running a commercial business within the two-family residential “B” zone. Oakland Avenue resident Roy Aletti, who has spoken out against the proposed rezon- ing several times in the past year, reiterated that the B zone was rezoned in 1974 so that no commercial expansion could be done to the location. “Sometimes, things with the best intent go awry,” Aletti said. “This should’ve been cut out of the master plan.” According to Aletti, the commercial busi- nesses which have operated along Oakland Avenue since the 1970s, have been perpetually “abusing” their non-conforming status for sev- eral years. “Get in there and straighten it out,” Aletti told Town Council members. Residents in West Harrison also addressed concerns about “possible redevelopment” list- ed within the draft for the Lake Street Quarry site. Lake Street resident Sam Fanelli questioned the board on whether they intended to change the zoning of the area from the existing single family residential or “R-1” zone status. “Development could mean anything,” Fanelli PLAN from page 1 said, “as long as we’re not pushing for new de- velopment of commercial property.” Republican Councilman Steve Malfi tano said that in order for anything to evolve, there it would need to meet the approval of the neigh- bors. Purchase resident Ted Demirjian asked the board on the consultant’s suggestion proposing a roundabout at the intersection of Anderson Hill Road and Purchase Street as a way to ease traffi c. “The master plan doesn’t mention how this would be addressed or remedied,” Demirjian said. “Would the road be widened to two lanes? Obviously, this would impact the way any cars would go in and out of Anderson Hill Road.” At the conclusion of the hearing, residents re- quested the council perform an Environmental Impact Statement prior to the approval of a new master plan. The approval of the new master plan will not come easily. The last redraft was in 1987 and a draft put together in 2007 was shelved amid resident concerns and only resurrected last March. The guidance of a plan is non-binding, but offers a guiding map for direction of devel- opment and zoning within a community. The hearing on the draft master plan will continue into the next council meeting on Dec. 20.
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 9 Local doctors discuss brain health at symposium By ALEXANDRA BOGDANOVIC STAFF REPORTER alexandra@hometwn.com Moderate exercise, getting enough sleep, mental and social stimulation and maintain- ing good cardiac health are all keys to keep- ing the brain healthy as we age, according to local health experts. Doctors John H. Morrison and Rajiv R. Ratan provided tips during a Dec. 1 seminar on the subject at the Westchester County Center in White Plains. Addressing the audience during the two- hour presentation, Morrison, a dean of basic sciences and dean of the Graduate School of Biological Sciences at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, began by explaining the brain’s basic function. In simple terms, the brain is an organ of behavior, he said. It processes incoming information and allows us to adopt our behavior to our perceptions of the outside world. The part of our brain in charge of “ex- ecutive function” that allows us to make decisions, reason and pay attention to de- tails, and the part of our brain in charge of learning memory, which allows us to recall life experiences, are both affected by aging, Morrison said. Its effects on the synapses in the hippo- campus can be manifested in “forgetful- ness,” Morrison explained. For instance, according to the doctor, someone may have trouble remembering where he or she parked his or her car. When the synapses in the prefrontal cortex are affect- ed, people can have trouble navigating their daily lives. In such cases, someone may have trouble getting home from the store, even though they’ve driven the route thousands of times before. Common forgetfulness differs from dementia, which is defined as the loss of life- time memories, the inability to form new memories, the loss of sense of identity and eventually, the ability to rea- son, Morrison said. Although aging affects all organs, Ratan, a professor of neurology and neuroscience and an associate dean at the Weill Cornell Medical College, said brain plasticity or the alteration of some brain synapses, and generation of new neurons, can be shaped to “resist” diseases and normal changes associated with aging by providing “positive training.” Diet, exercise and “cognitive training” can all help ward off the effects of aging that are caused by free radicals or toxins that accumu- late in our bodies as we age, he said. “Exercise for 30 min- utes every other day at moderate intensity in- creases vascular fitness and helps with manage- ment of diabetes,” Ratan said. “There are also known areas in the brain where new neurons are born as we exercise.” Although we sleep less as we age, getting the proper kind of sleep is an important factor in maintaining brain health, Ratan said. Some studies have shown that toxins are suppressed during “deep sleep,” he explained. Morrison also said that increased men- tal activity helps maintain brain health. Something as simple as playing bridge can be beneficial. Maintaining a strong sup- port system by socializing with friends, family and other peer groups is also important, he said. Both Morrison and Ratan emphasized the importance of “heart health,” since stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States. A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is disrupted, and multiple strokes can result in dementia, Ratan said. Risk fac- tors for stroke include high blood pressure, smoking and high lipid levels, he said. The good news is that getting to the hos- pital for appropriate treatment quickly can minimize the damage caused by strokes, he added. Dr. Sheree L. Loftus, a nurse scien- tist at Take Charge Through Exercise in Pleasantville, said she enjoyed the presenta- tion, but wished Ratan and Morrison would have shared more recommendations for healthy aging with the audience. “I do brain-aging research and there is so much information out there,” she said. Verna Marcovici of Scarsdale said she also enjoyed the presentation, which was sponsored by the AARP of New York and the Dana alliance for Brain Initiatives. “I liked the presentation. It was very in- formative. The brain is amazing – it is so mysterious,” she said. Marcovici said she was especially re- lieved to learn that something as simple as bridge can help maintain brain health. “I play bridge,” she said. Dr. Rajiv Ratan, the executive director of Burke Medical Research Institute, is one of the health professionals who discussed ways to keep the brain healthy while aging during a symposium on the subject at the Westchester County Center in White Plains Dec. 1. Photo courtesy/Burke.org
  • 10 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 Rye runners come out for annual “Turkey Run” On Nov. 24, runners of all ages came to the Rye Recreational Center to take park in the 36th Annual Turkey Run. The event featured treks of various miles, such as the 1-mile “Fun Run” and the 5.2K Turkey Run. Ready, set go! Participants line up for the 1-mile “Fun Run” at the Rye Recreational Center. The start of the Paw Trot at the Recreation Center in Rye Nov. 24. A sign notifying participants of the 36th annual Turkey Run activities. Three young participants are all smiles just minutes before the start of the Fun Run Nov. 24 at the 36th annual Turkey Run. Runners and supporters attended the 36th annual Turkey Run at the Rye Recreational Center. Alexandra Swiatocha of Somers is the first female finisher in the 5.2K Turkey Run at the Rye Recreational Center. Photos/Bobby Begun
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 11 State job numbers bring optimism to merchants By ALEXANDRA BOGDANOVIC STAFF REPORTER alexandra@hometwn.com With a tumultuous autumn in the rear view mirror and October job numbers showing im- provement, some area retailers are optimistic about the holiday shopping season. The statistics released by the state Labor Department Nov. 20 show New York State added 5,900 private sector jobs and the number of unemployed dropped by 17,500 in October. The statewide unemployment rate fell from 8.9 percent to 8.7 percent. Because the numbers are not “seasonally adjusted,” the state Labor Department said the most valid comparisons with this type of data are year-to-year comparisons of the same month. A closer look at the data reveals the un- employment rate in the Putnam-Westchester- Rockland region was 6.9 percent this October, as compared to 6.5 percent in October 2011. In Westchester alone, the unemployment rate was 7.1 percent this October as compared to 6.5 percent last October. Even so, the county’s October 2012 figure reflects slight improvement from the previous month, when the unemployment rate stood at 7.3 percent. In Rye, merchants reported a successful start to the holiday shopping season Dec. 2, but said it was too soon to say whether the positive news on the job front has definitely boosted consumer confidence in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and a divisive national election. “The enthusiasm has been evident and we’ve definitely been picking up on it,” said Heidi Price, manager of the Walin and Wolff boutique on Purchase Street. “I’d say we’re on par if not a little bit better in terms of sales that we were in comparison with the first weekend in December last year, but the next couple of weeks will be a better indicator of how things are going.” Rob Gillick, who was working behind the counter at Parker’s on Purchase Street, also said sales there were keeping pace with or slightly better than those made on the first Saturday in December last year. In Bronxville, Louisa McTurner, the owner of Weezie D ladies boutique on Park Place, said she and her staff members are “very ex- cited” about the holiday shopping season, and reported increased sales in comparison with the same time period last year. “I think our clients are very excited about the holidays,” McTurner said Dec. 3. “It’s very festive here and you just can’t get around it.” Customers are shopping for a lot of “special occasion” dresses and finding them at reason- able prices, according to McTurner. The shop also carries a lot of “fun pieces” and receives new shipments all the time, she added. Maria DiLeonardo, owner of Sirens bou- tique on Mamaroneck Avenue in Mamaroneck, said she has no reason to believe this holiday season will be different from any of the others she had since she started her business back in 2002. “This is my 10th year in business and I’ve never had a bad Christmas,” she said. “I never had an issue even through the recession.” DiLeonardo, who said she has a “very close relationship” with her clients, said she doesn’t forget that some people only have a $10 to $15 budget for gift giving, and offers merchandise at various price points to match their needs. “Each year, I’ve been here has been stron- ger for me,” said DiLeonardo, adding that she works long hours and keeps the shop open until 8 p.m. on Christmas Eve in order to ac- commodate last-minute shoppers. While DiLeonardo remains hard at work, the state Labor Department statistics show thousands of people rejoined the workforce in the 12-month cycle between October 2011 and 2012. During that time, the state’s pri- vate sector job count increased by more than 133,000 and the number of initial claims for unemployment in New York State fell from 102,041 to 93,645, or 8.2 percent. Rye’s shopping district pictured during the spring. Local job numbers released by the state Department of Labor have Westchester retailers hoping for strong sales during the holiday shopping season. File photo
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  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 13 Letters Generator use can be inconsiderate NEWS TIPS Unfortunately, our reporters cannot be everywhere. If you see news in the making or have an idea for a news story, call us. Community reporters and correspondence are listed at left. LETTERS The community’s opinion matters. If you have a view to express, simply write a letter to the editor by email to mark@hometwn.com, fax or mail. Please include a phone number and name for verification purposes. Word limit: 625. No unsolicited Op/Eds, food, film reviews. COMMUNITY EVENTS If you have an event you would like to share with the community, send it via email to news@hometwn.com. Deadline for community news is noon on Fridays. Space is not guaranteed. Send listings to news@hometwn.com. DELIVERY For home delivery, call Marcia Schultz at (914) 653-1000 x25. CONTRIBUTORS: Alexandra Bogdanovic, Jason Chirevas, Christian Falcone, Ashley Helms POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Harrison Report, c/o HomeTown Media Group, 200 William St., Port Chester, N.Y. 10573 The Harrison Report is published weekly for a subscription price of $30 per year by Home Town Media Group, 200 William St., Port Chester, N.Y. 10573. Standard Postage is paid at White Plains, New York 200 WILLIAM ST., PORT CHESTER, N.Y. 10573 • Tel: (914) 653-1000 Fax: (914) 653-5000 Howard Sturman Publisher x21 publisher@hometwn.com Mark Lungariello Editor-in-Chief x19 mark@hometwn.com Rachel McCain Deputy Editor x30 news@hometwn.com Mike Smith Assoc. Sports Editor x22 sports@hometwn.com Marcia Shultz Subscriptions, Classifieds x25 Advertising Coordinator x27 marcia@hometwn.com ads@hometwn.com Daniel Offner Reporter x26 dan@hometwn.com Lindsay Sturman Advertising Account Manager x14 lsturman@hometwn.com Bobby Begun Photographer Arthur Gedin Art Director x24 art1@hometwn.com To the Editor, Our street (and most of Rye) did not have power, heat or phones for a full 12 days after Hurricane Sandy. During this time, one of our neighbors had a very large and loud generator running 24/7. While we understood that this was a time of crisis, my father is an employee of the MTA and was called to go into work from day one. He had to get up at 4 a.m. every morning to make it to New York City to help out, however, he and the rest of the family found it impossible to sleep with the generator running next door. This generator is placed strategically right next to the divid- ing fence between the properties and away from my neighbor’s house with a detached garage in between to buffer the noise for them. For us, this was a nightmare as the vibrations visibly shook our windows. We had concerns regarding the location before but because we never had such a blackout, we dismissed them when- ever the generator was in use for only a few hours at a time. We respectfully asked our neighbors the first night if they wouldn’t mind shutting it off for a mere three hours so that my father could get some sleep before heading into the city. Their response was to tell us that they had hundreds of dollars worth of food in their fridge and could not let it spoil. We pointed out that it would not spoil in three hours if they did not open the fridge and that the rest of the block would inevitably lose their own food within the next two days. They still refused, claiming they did not know how to turn it off. This upset us at their lack of sympathy when my father was losing sleep on behalf of fellow New Yorkers including our neighbors. After a few days of trying to deal with the noise and cold, we were forced to abandon ship and live in my sister’s apartment. On one of the last nights without power, we attempted to move back home and sleep, but the generator still proved to be intolerable and my father lost his temper. He went over and demanded to know why nothing had been done about the noise at night and asked angrily again to please turn it off for three hours. They claimed they did not know how to shut it off and suggested we use earplugs. By Thanksgiving, thankfully, life in Rye was returning to nor- mal. However, for no apparent reason, the generator went off again next door–even though the power was on. My sister went over to see what was going on and in a minute they managed to turn it off, which brought on shaking of the heads from us. We have asked Rye police to help us talk to them, but we were told that “they couldn’t find the house,” which is rather silly con- sidering it was the only one with power and directly in front of a known intersection before admitting that we simply had to deal with the noise. While we understand it was a crisis, there is a law in Rye that states that if a noise is above a certain Hertz, there could be a fine. We obviously don’t have the equipment to measure how loud it is, nor do we wish a fine on our neighbors, but would like to know if everyone else with generators was this stubborn during Sandy? Was it unreasonable of us to ask them to turn it off for the three hours a night? And can something be done about the location and the hours of operation for the future? Sarah Lee, Rye Kelly is a 2-3 year old female Beagle Mix around 25 pounds. She is acclimating to her foster home, which in- cludes three children, two dogs and two cats. Kelly is very alert, inquisitive and intelligent and gets along very well with everyone she meets. She is learning to respond to her name and also working on her basic commands. Kelly en- joys being in a crate and is making progress on her house- training. Kelly is spayed, vaccinated, dewormed, heartworm tested and micro-chipped. The adoption donation for Kelly is $250. To learn more, contact Larchmont Pet Rescue at (914) 834-6955 or visit NY-PetRescue.org.
  • 14 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 Business Briefs At Home on the Sound membership drive underway and professional achievement. A publication of Thomson Reuters, Super Lawyers selects attorneys using a rigorous, multiphase pro- cess that includes independent research, peer nominations and peer evaluations. Selections are made on an annual, state-by-state basis. “Rising Stars” features top up-and-coming attorneys who are 40 years of age and under or who have been practicing for 10 years or less. Up to 5 percent of the lawyers in the state are named by Super Lawyers; 2.5 percent are named to the “Rising Stars” list. Andrew E. Blustein, partner/director and chair of the Health Care Information and Technology and Insurance Regulatory Practice Groups, is also co-chair of the HIPAA Compliance Group and a member of the Health Care, Business, and Compliance and White Collar Defense Practice Groups. His practice includes the representation of hospitals, physicians, clinics and other health care industry-related clients (both for profit and not-for-profit). He also assists insurance companies and other clients in developing provider networks and in addressing various regulatory issues. Blustein has been listed in Super Lawyers for three years. For more information about Super Lawyers, visit super- lawyers.com. Sound Shore Medical Center appoints faculty practice physician Sound Shore Medical Center is pleased to an- nounce the appointment of Anna Kazanskaya to its faculty practice in in- ternal medicine, located at 830 Pelhamdale Ave. in New Rochelle. In her new position, Kazanskaya will bring her expertise, healthcare philosophy and caring to patients 18 years of age and older. Kazanskaya is board certified in both in- ternal medicine and geriatric medicine. She is a Cum Laude graduate of Petrozavodsk State University School of Medicine and completed her internal medicine residency at Sound Shore Medical Center in New Rochelle, where she was selected to serve as chief resident. Kazanskaya was then awarded a prestigious fellowship in geriatric medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University. Upon completion, she returned to the Northeast and was in private practice for five years before returning to New Rochelle and accepting a medical staff position at Sound Shore Medical Center. Kazanskaya has practiced medicine in the New Rochelle area since 2001 and is an assistant professor of clinical medicine at New York Medical College. Kazanskaya can be reached at the New Rochelle office during regular hours: Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. The office telephone number is (914) 636-5110. Westchester Squash opens in Mamaroneck Squash is a sport that has been around for centuries, and recently interest has been grow- ing at a phenomenal rate. In 2003, Forbes rat- ed squash as the number one healthiest sport to play. It combines the athletic elements of At Home on the Sound is offering new members a reduced membership fee during the month of December. New members who join before Dec. 31 will receive 20 percent off the regular annual fee of $370 per year for an individual and $495 per year for a household. At Home on the Sound is a nonprofit com- munity organization that strives to improve the quality of life for adults ages 60 and over in Mamaroneck and Larchmont. At Home on the Sound offers its members cultural and social programs such as lectures, trips, classes and workshops; individualized services such as Medicare counseling; access to pre-screened, reliable home maintenance professionals; free transportation to medical appointments and errands; and more. Some popular programs include a weekly gentle yoga class, current events club, a “Dine-About,” and Senior Scenes–an improvisational theater workshop. Established in 2010, At Home on the Sound was created through a grass roots effort by lo- cal residents who felt passionately that they and others like them should have a support system to help them continue to enjoy a vi- brant, independent lifestyle while remaining in their own homes and staying connected to the Sound Shore community. At Home on the Sound is part of a growing national trend to support and promote aging-in-place. For more information about membership or volunteer opportunities, call (914) 899-3150 or visit athomeonthesound.org. New Rochelle resident among New York “Super Lawyers” Garfunkel Wild is pleased to announce that 11 Garfunkel Wild attor- neys have been selected for inclusion in the 2012 New York Super Lawyers – Metro Edition. These include founding partner/ chairman Robert Andrew Wild and partner/director Andrew E. Blustein, a resident of New Rochelle, among many oth- ers. Super Lawyers is a listing of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition agility, endurance, hand-eye coordination and precise strategy into one game. Adults and kids of all ages are playing the sport, with exceptional growth among high school and middle school players, as well as college students. Westchester Squash, located at 628 Fayette Ave. in Mamaroneck offers four international courts and a coaching staff that has developed players from beginner to the most elite ju- nior national and international levels. David Palmer, former World No. 1 and two-time World Champion and multiple British Open Champion, is a partner and one of the owners of Westchester Squash. Members enjoy access to weekly league play, round robins, and arranged skill level matches. Junior Day Camps are also avail- able for kids of all playing levels, to improve their technical skills while enjoying a fun day of squash. The next Junior Day Camps will be held on Election Day and Veterans Day. Westchester Squash hosts U.S. Squash tour- naments (upcoming U.S. Bronze on Dec. 7- 9), coaches teams of several area schools, and holds summer camps for juniors. For more information, call (914) 698-0095 or visit westchestersquash.com. Mamaroneck Artists Guild ushers in the new year in style The Mamaroneck Artist Guild ushers in the new year with “Black & White” – a new exhibition of work with black and white as the theme opening on Jan. 9, 2013 and running through Jan. 26, 2013. Artist members will exhibit works in a wide variety of media including oil, watercolor, printmaking, fiber, photography, jewelry, mixed media and sculpture. Meet the artists and celebrate the new year and this new exhibition of fine art at an open- ing reception on Jan. 12, 2013 from 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday from 12 p.m. – 5 p.m. The gallery is located at 126 Larchmont Ave. in Larchmont. Admission is free. Coldwell Banker offices donate items for Hurricane Sandy victims The Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office in Rye is pleased to have recently par- ticipated in relief efforts for Hurricane Sandy victims by collecting and donating a variety of items. Among the items collected were: towels, blankets, batteries, cleaning supplies and school supplies. The donations were made to Catholic Charities of New York to be distributed to people on Staten Island affected by the hur- ricane. Another truckload of donated supplies was delivered to Brooklyn residents who needed assistance. The Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office in Rye was one of five Coldwell Banker offices in Westchester County that participated in the collection drive. Burke Rehabilitation Hospital to host food, coat drive for holidays In order to help those in need during the holiday season, Burke Rehabilitation Hospital will sponsor a food and coat drive at its main campus and satellite centers throughout Westchester County and the Bronx. The drive will take place from Nov. 19 through Dec. 31. Donated food will be distrib- uted through the Food Bank for Westchester and the coats by NY Cares. Both organiza- tions are uniquely positioned to ensure the donations go to those in our community who need assistance. Non-perishable, unexpired food will be collected at all of Burke’s locations. Items needed by the Food Bank for Westchester are can openers, cans of tuna, granola bars, peanut butter in plastic jars, condensed or powdered milk, cheese or peanut butter crack- ers, juice boxes, applesauce and fruit cups in plastic containers, toilet paper, hand sanitizer and wipes, tissues, soups and other meals in a can. The Food bank cannot accept food in glass jars. The general public can drop off items at the following locations: • White Plains - Burke Rehabilitation Hospital Lobby Wood Pavilion, 785 Mamaroneck Ave. • White Plains - Burke Rehabilitation Hospital Building No. 8, Outpatient Services • White Plains - Burke Rehabilitation Hospital Building No. 4, Billings Building • Mamaroneck - Burke Rehabilitation Outpatient Clinic, 703 W. Boston Post Road • Purchase - Burke Rehabilitation Outpatient Clinic, 3020 Westchester Ave. • Bronx - Burke Rehabilitation Outpatient Clinic, 2826 Westchester Ave. To learn more about how you can help dur- ing the drive, call (914) 597-2848. Send us your Business News! The next Business Briefs section will run on Jan. 4. Please send any submission for our January issue to biz@hometwn.com by Friday, Dec. 28. Each submission can include one pic- ture and must be between 175-225 words. If you have any questions, email Deputy Editor Rachel McCain at news@hometwn.com. 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  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 15SPORTS Icing the competition Players to watch this hockey season points in the section. So far, Barry’s start has been slower than Ramondelli’s. The latter already has 5 goals and 2 as- sists, but when the two start clicking again, other teams might be in trouble. Michael Benincasa, Rye The Rye senior was a bright spot for the Garnets last season, serving as Rye’s grand facilitator. In the 2011- 2012 season, Benincasa had 33 assists, putting him just behind Ramondelli for third place in the section. If Benincasa can continue his strong play this winter, he can help the Garnets develop a core of scorers around him, making Rye a well-rounded team. Brian Ketchebaw, Rye Town/Harrison Ketchebaw may have spent last season backing up his older brother Jamie, but the time has come for the younger Ketchebaw to get his shot. Last year, in limited time, the Rye Town/Harrison netminder allowed just 6 goals on 81 shots, earning himself a goals-against average of 1.81 on the year. In the Titans’ only game so far, Ketchebaw allowed just 2 goals, despite being peppered (unofficially) by over 30 shots. For a Titan team that lost 10 seniors to graduation, having a steady hand in goal will be a major plus. Trey Herlitz-Ferguson, Mamaroneck At 6 foot 3, Mamaroneck’s forward pres- ents a tall order for opposing defenses hop- ing to keep him off the stat sheet. Through three games this season, nobody’s been able to stop the senior, who has already tallied 9 scores–four more than he scored last year. Last season, Mamaroneck suffered something of a down year without a true top-line scoring threat. If Herlitz-Ferguson can emerge as that piece of the puzzle, the Tigers could be tough to stop. Chris Ramondelli/Brett Barry, New Rochelle Ramondelli and Barry helped the Huguenots take big steps forward last season, and they should once again be factors in the Division 1 landscape with another year of varsity ex- perience under their belts. Last season, both Ramondelli and Barry were fixtures on the tops of the leaderboards, and finished third and sixth, respectively, for the most overall New Rochelle’s Brett Barry skates against Eastchester- Tuckahoe-Bronxville in a sectional game in February 2012. Barry is back this year, alongside teammate Chris Ramondelli, to provide the Huguenots with a strong 1-2 punch. Photo/Mike Smith Cheerleaders win big The Harrison High School varsity cheerleaders are once again on top following two first place finishes and a second place finish in the large division at the County Center Championships at the Westchester County Center on Nov. 19. The cheering Huskies finished in first place on Nov. 17 at the Eastchester Invitational. This follows their first place at Beacon High School in the Fall Westchester, Putnam, Dutchess, Rockland County Cheerleading Coaches Association Competition. (Submitted) The Harrison High School varsity cheerleaders pose at the Eastchester Invitational. The squad went on to win two first place finishes and a second place finish at the County Center Championships last month. Contributed photo Harrison Huskies ATHLETE OF THE WEEK David Polakoff By MIKE SMITH ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR sports@hometwn.com Entering his fourth year on the Harrison wrestling squad, David Polakoff has just one goal for him- self for the 2012-2013 season: win a section crown. The 145 pounder has improved steadily since his rookie campaign at 112 pounds, and now, in his last go-around with the Huskies, he is looking for his shot at the state tournament. Polakoff is off to a good start so far, be- ginning the season going 6-0 at the annual Port Chester tournament, and the senior feels comfortable with the weight he’s wrestling at right now. “I feel the strongest I’ve ever been,” said Polakoff. “Right now, I feel like I can match up with anyone in the section.” The Husky has been keep- ing his eyes on the 145-pound landscape, and said that while there’s not one particular challenger who worries him, he is following the season of Fox Lane’s Tyler Grippi, who hasn’t committed to a weight yet. “At Port Chester, he wrestled at the weight class above me,” said Polakoff. “So I’m not sure where he’s going yet.” As for his teammate, Polakoff hopes to be a leader that will help the younger Huskies strive to improve on the mat. “When we wrestle other teams, I want them to know who we are,” said the senior. “I want them to be afraid to lose.”
  • 16 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 SPORTS Rye Town/Harrison Titans drop opener to Raiders By MIKE SMITH ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR sports@hometwn.com On Nov. 30, the Rye Town/Harrison Titans kicked off the 2012-2013 season with a tough loss to a good Scarsdale hockey team. But despite the defeat–and the prospect of a sea- son that might prove to be tumultuous as the weeks leading up to the campaign–this young Titans team appears to be poised for success. Taking on the Raiders at Murray’s Ice Rink in Yonkers, the Titans fell behind quickly in the first period and were never able to estab- lish their game against an aggressive attack by Scarsdale, falling to the Raiders 2-1. Titans’ coach Brian Rabinowitz, however, saw plenty of positives in his team’s first game and be- lieves that soon enough, the squad will be able to turn things around. “I was definitely pleased,” said the head coach. “I thought that the effort was good–we played with the intensity we needed, and with 10 new guys on the team, losing as many se- niors as we did, that was a good start.” Rabinowitz was especially impressed with sophomore goaltender Brian Ketchebaw’s performance. Ketchebaw, taking over start- ing goalie duties from his older brother Jamie who graduated last spring, was superb on the night. Ketchebaw made roughly 30 saves (both Rabinowitz and Scarsdale coach Jim Mancuso took issue with the official scorers at the game, who gave Ketchebaw just 18 saves. Mancuso filed a protest on the Titans’ behalf). The Rye Playland Ice Rink, pictured here, was supposed to be the Titans’ home ice this season. Superstorm Sandy, which hit in October, has rendered the rink inoperable, forcing Rye Town/Harrison to search for ice time elsewhere. Photo/Bobby Begun Jake Picker leads the charge against Scarsdale on Nov. 30. Picker will be one of the Titans tabbed with getting the offense going this season. “He may be young, but he plays the game with the ability and maturity of a senior,” said Rabinowitz of his netminder. “He’s going to be a stud and he stood on his head against a very good Scarsdale team.” Aside from his goaltender, Rabinowitz, a first-year head coach, is still getting to know his players, though a few, such as senior Ian Bass and sophomore Dom Brescia will be key to the Titan’s success this year. “With this being a mixed-school program, we’re still learning what we have,” said the head coach. “But we’re going to need contri- butions from guys like [Jake] Picker, Jacob Chalfin and Mitch Milbauer and other guys as well.” Perhaps the biggest obstacle facing the Titans this year isn’t its youth, but the fact that the team–like its rivals from Rye–will be without a single home game the entire season. October’s Superstorm Sandy has rendered the teams’ home venue, Playland, unusable for the season, prompting both Rye Town/ Harrison and Rye to look for ice time in order to fill out their schedules. To date, the Titans have rescheduled all but two of their games, and find themselves playing home contests all over Westchester County and beyond. The team’s Jan. 18 game against the Garnets will be held in Norwalk’s SoNo Ice House. “We don’t have home ice and that’s not ideal,” said Rabinowitz. “But these kids are resilient. It’s not bothering them at all, they’re just looking to play hockey.” Goalie Brian Ketchebaw looks at the action down-ice against Scarsdale. Ketchebaw had around 30 saves against the Raiders, should a protest of the official scorers be upheld. Photos/Mike Smith
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  • Vol. 12/Number 49 www.myharrisonreport.com December 7, 2012 Master Plan process extended By DANIEL OFFNER STAFF REPORTER dan@hometwn.com The members of the Harrison Town Council have decided to defer approving a new town/village mas- ter plan and continue to hear public comment on the document until, at least, the board’s next meeting. “There is still major work that needs to be done here,” said Councilman Joseph Cannella, a Republican. During a Dec. 3 meeting of the Town Council, residents expressed concerns over the ambiguity of sev- eral proposals put forth in the plan, which was drafted by consultants at BFJ Planning. The draft suggests an increase to property lot requirements in the two-family zone, rehashing a con- troversial proposal that has been the result of an ongoing battle to alter the zoning regulations within the two-family residential “B” zone. The increase would allow for new development, but restricts the 1,500 existing two-family properties to non-conforming status. This means the existing property could remain at the current 5,000 square foot lot requirement, but in the event of a disaster or major modification, a home would have to be rebuilt in a manner conforming to the new code or seek a variance. Downtown resident Anthony Marella said that changing the mini- mum lot requirements, as per the suggestion of the plan would have a substantial impact to the value of all two-family residential properties. “This would cause hardship to anyone who owns any of these homes,” Marella said. “Please leave our B-Zone homes alone.” Marella went on to suggest that the council consider a system of parking permits for residents within in the B-Zone as an alternative, which would allow the town to limit the number of cars parked alongside two-family homes. In addition to the lot require- ments, the consultants with BFJ have also proposed rezoning a portion of Oakland Avenue–spe- cifically between Grant and Park avenues–to commercial. Another contentious proposal to re- PLAN continued on page 8 The September 2012 proposed master plan draft remains in limbo until details are ironed out with planning consultants. A public hearing on the non-binding zoning and development guidebook will continue on Dec. 20. Contributed photo 2013 budget avoids cuts to service By DANIEL OFFNER STAFF REPORTER dan@hometwn.com Municipal department heads are pleading that the members of the Harrison Town Council reconsider restoring staffing levels in the 2013 budget. But while members of the Town Council mull over a proposed $56 million spending plan, they opened the floor to suggestions from the departments on how to maintain services while limiting spending increases next year. Currently, the council’s proposal shows no cuts in municipal services while salaries for town employees have remained flat from last year. Commissioner of the Public Works Department Anthony Robinson suggested that the town reinstate a few items back into the budget, including three new hires and three promotions costing an additional $95,000 that was previ- ously unbudgeted for. According to Robinson, the department could see savings if the town eliminated one of their sanitation programs cur- rently in use. "This would put some of our guys back in the available pool," Robinson said. Restructuring the commercial property pickup could “find” the budgeting money to allow for the extra hires and promotions, he said. Building Inspector Robert FitzSimmons stated that in addi- tion to a significant amount of per- mit fees for construction projects including for a Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital and LifeTime Fitness, the department had a sur- plus of $100,000 in revenue. "We have two major projects on- going with a few more coming up next year," FitzSimmons said. Due to a lack of manpower, FitzSimmons has requested the council consider allocating some of the surplus revenue toward hiring a new person, either on a per diem or contractual basis, to remain on site of one of the larger-scale projects scheduled for next year. Earlier this year, the police de- partment hired five new patrolmen under new PBA union contracts that would reduce the salaries for new hires by 10 percent from their predecessors. Police Chief Anthony Marraccini urged the council to keep the three additional staff hires already listed in the budget, with the ultimate goal of approaching the department’s former roster of more than 70 employees. Hiring new staff would boost the 61 members currently on the force to a total of 64, increasing police salaries by a nominal $155,000 next year. "We've been stripped down to the bare minimum...at times, we don't have enough police cars in service," Marraccini said during a public hearing on Dec. 3. "Unfortunately, Harrison is not immune to criminal activity." According to Marraccini, the budget additionally left important department programs by the way- side, including the youth bureau and the need for a school resource officer. Although the current budget shows a slight surplus in police revenues that could contribute to the cost for new hires, the town plans on spending $1.4 million in overtime SERVICES continued on page 4
  • 2 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 3 New Laundromat set to open downtown By DANIEL OFFNER STAFF REPORTER dan@hometwn.com Harrison’s downtown will soon become awash with change. A new Laundromat com- ing to downtown Harrison is being embraced by residents in the area, but the owner of an existing Laundromat feels the competition could put his business through the spin cycle. During the past half-century, it has been an uphill struggle to revamp Harrison’s down- town business district and attract new retail businesses, as an abundance of vacant store- fronts and a lack of foot traffic on the strip has plagued the area. Harrison Police Lt. Michael Olsey found that the vacant one-story property, formerly occupied by the New York Dance Academy, was prime real estate to open a business. “I saw the empty storefront and had been kicking the idea around for a while,” Olsey said. “I thought it would be ideal for a Laundromat.” Olsey said he plans on investing roughly $750,000 to create a new coin-operated wash- and-fold Laundromat that would include drop-off service and 20 new energy efficient machines. Following a public hearing on Dec. 3, members of the Harrison Town Council unan- imously voted to approve the construction at 222 Harrison Ave. But for Jamie Vintimilla, who owns the Harrison Laundry Station on Halstead Avenue–the town’s only Laundromat–said that officials had not informed him of the pro- posal, which would be less then a block away from his business. “I don’t think it’s fair,” said Vintimilla. “At this point, I don’t know what to do.” According to Vintimilla, he previously had approached the town four years ago to apply for a new location, but was denied because the law would not permit him to build another Laundromat downtown. Currently, there are more than four dry cleaners in the downtown business district and only one Laundromat. Although there are sev- eral options to wash and dry clothes in neigh- boring municipalities, some residents feel that having a larger facility closer to home would be more convenient. Harrison resident Maria Coronel said that several times the existing Laundromat on Halstead became so crowded that people would just have to stand around and wait. “Some days there are so many people that have to wait for a dryer,” said Coronel, 35. “And it’s too expensive to use the machines.” Resident James Nochec, who lives atop the Laundromat downtown, said that on days when the Laundromat gets crowded people are left with no amenities other than to sit and wait for their chance to use a machine. “Everybody wants a new Laundromat… we don’t have anybody else in town,” said Nochec, 49. “I had to go to Port Chester to do my laundry.” Former Chamber of Commerce President Ada Angarano explained that while she can understand the need for more machines, she would have hoped for a retail store. “This is not going to help bring customers to the town,” Anagarano said. A sign inside of 222 Harrison Ave., a site where Michael Olsey has proposed to construct a new Laundromat. Photo/Daniel Offner
  • 4 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 Community Briefs Volunteers needed for SPRYE SPRYE (Staying Put in Rye and Environs, Rye, Port Chester, Harrison and Rye Brook) helps older adults remain connected to their community and able to remain in their homes as they age. One of the services the organi- zation provides is transportation to medical appointments, shopping and other essential errands. SPRYE is currently in need of vol- unteer drivers; even a two hour a week com- mitment will provide a round trip ride for one of the members. For more information, call (914) 481-5706. Help the GNC aid families in need The Greenburgh Nature Center is working with Open Door Foundation to ensure that children from families of less fortunate means receive a brand new toy or gift this holiday season. Donate a new toy or gift (unwrapped) for children (ages newborn to 14 years old). Drop off your unwrapped gift at the GNC Manor House between Nov. 24 – Dec. 17 (closed fridays). All of the toys will be distrib- uted to young patients of Open Door Family Medical Centers. Toy/gift value should be $10-$20 each. For more information about the Open Door Foundation, visit opendoormedical.org. Harrison resident, tennis pro offers adult tennis program this fall Jeffrey Greene, longtime Westchester resi- dent, successful college tennis coach, highly- ranked USTA Eastern Section Senior Men’s veteran tournament competitor and current director of tennis at Camp Pennigewassett in New Hampshire, will be offering an adult tennis program on weekends this fall. Classes will be held on Saturday and Sunday morn- ings at Harrison High School and will con- tinue through the end of November. To register, please go to the Solazzo Center, located at 270 Harrison Ave. (opposite the train station) or for additional information, call the Harrison Recreation Office at (914) 670-3179 for further details. Events at the Harrison Public Library, Bruce Avenue Dec. 10, 17 and 24 at 10:30 a.m. Storyland, ages 3 to 5 (siblings welcome) Dec. 10 and 17 at 4 p.m. Board games for all ages. Dec. 10 at 3:30 p.m. Legos at the library Ages 5 and up Come build a holiday themed creation. Dec. 12 and 19 at 10 a.m. and again at 11 a.m. Circle Time for Tots Songs and stories for the little ones with Miss Claudia. Dec. 13 at 10:30 and 11 a.m. Wiggle & Giggle with Dawny Dew Ages 1 – 6 Come celebrate the season with fun holiday songs. For more information on events at the li- brary, call (914) 835-0324 “Performathon 2012” comes to the Music Conservatory of Westchester The Music Conservatory of Westchester, a nonprofit community music school with students and faculty from throughout the region, has partnered with The Digital Arts Experience, a digital media arts instruction facility in downtown White Plains, to bring “Performathon 2012” to music lovers through- out the region on Dec. 8. Held once every two years, Performathon is an all-day marathon of more than 150 musical performances that also includes a holiday gift boutique and an array of gourmet foods from around the world. Performathon 2012 takes place from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. at the Music Conservatory of Westchester, located at 216 Central Ave. in White Plains, and is free and open to the public. The event kicks off with a faculty jazz concert starting at 6:30 p.m. on Dec. 7 at The Digital Arts Experience, located at 170 Hamilton Ave. in White Plains. Concert by Westchester Chorale On Dec. 8, the Westchester Chorale will present its holiday choral concert featuring Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Cantata 140” and Camille Saint-Saëns’ “Oratorio de Noël.” The 50 singers of the Westchester Chorale will be accompanied by full orchestra, including several Larchmont-area musicians. Directed by Douglas Kostner, the concert will also feature renowned harpist Grace Clouthier. The concert will take place at 4 p.m. at the Larchmont Avenue Church, located at 60 Forest Park Ave. in Larchmont. For more information, call (914) 237-9546, email info@westchesterchorale.org, or visit west- chesterchorale.org. Tickets are available at the door or via website: $25/general admission; $20/seniors; and $10/students. White Plains resident hosts Music for Parkinson’s concert White Plains resident David Eger is bringing local musicians together to fight Parkinson’s disease at the 10th annual Music for Parkinson’s concert, with a goal of raising $50,000 for research. The concert will take place from 3:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. on Dec. 9 at the Dunn Performing Arts Center, located at Rye Country Day School in Rye. The Music for Parkinson’s concert typi- cally draws over 150 people and has raised more than $400,000 for Parkinson’s research since its inception. This year’s program will feature performances by premier musicians such as the Attacca Quartet, an internation- ally acclaimed ensemble; pianist Gena Raps, a Julliard graduate and faculty member at The New School; and John Stine, one of the event’s co-founders and principal clarinetist of the St. Thomas Chamber Music Players. Guests are invited to a wine and cheese reception with the musicians following the concert. To purchase tickets for Music for Parkinson’s, visit pdf.org/en/music. For more information, call (800) 457-6676, email info@pdf.org or visit pdf.org. Choral singers needed for Taconic Opera Taconic Opera invites choral singers to participate in the world premiere performance and professional recording of the oratorio “Enoch” by the company’s General and Artistic Director, Dan Montez. The work will feature the Taconic Opera chorus, profes- sional lead singers and full orchestra. All voice parts are welcome and no dues are required. Membership for experienced choristers will not require an audition. Scores will be available at a reduced price at rehears- als for $20, but they also can be purchased through amazon.com. The company will be presenting two per- formances of the oratorio in two locations: March 2, 2013, at 7:30 p.m. at the Ossining United Methodist Church; and March 3, 2013 at 3 p.m. at the White Plains Presbyterian Church. Rehearsals will continue on Wednesdays from 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. and Saturdays from 3 p.m. -5 p.m., with time off for the December holidays. The rehearsal location is the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, located at 801 Kitchawan Road (Route 134, between Taconic Parkway and Route 100) in Ossining (border of Yorktown). A dress rehearsal with leads and orchestra is scheduled for March 1, 2013 at 7 p.m. at the Ossining United Methodist Church. For more information, contact divamaryc@aol.com or call (914) 649-1826. Deadline for our Community Briefs section is every Friday at 12 p.m. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accom- modate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com. costs for police services. For the members of the Library Board of Trustees, the budget process has been difficult as it make necessary cuts to meet the threshold of 2 percent cap. Library officials requested the town tap into reserve funds to the tune of $215,000 to hire a full-time cleaner and technical support, but the Town Council seemed unwilling to move. "There are no free lunches any- more," said Republican Councilman Joe Cannella. Currently, the $56 million budget has not been adjusted with the exception of the police department who have allo- cated funding for three new officers in 2013. Because the Westchester County Police Academy runs only January and August, the police are staving off the hires until the next session. As dictated by law, members of the Harrison Town Council have until Dec. 20 to adopt the budget. SERVICES from page 1
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 5 Tele-town hall event draws 31,000 listeners Police nab credit card theft suspect More than 31,000 residents were on the line Nov. 28 to join Republican County Executive Robert P. Astorino for his fifth tele-town hall. Over the course of the town hall, which ran from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Astorino and constitu- ents discussed a wide range of topics that in- cluded the 2013 proposed budget, Playland, day care, Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, the federal housing settlement, health care, unfunded mandates and more. “One of the challenges we have in govern- ment is keeping residents informed,” Astorino said. “I really enjoy these tele-town halls be- cause they reach a lot of people but we can also talk to people one-on-one and answer their specific questions.” The proposed budget was a key topic as Astorino talked about the tough balance of delivering services while not raising taxes for the third year in a row. There was time for lighter conversation as well. Astorino asked each of the 16 callers during the hour what their favorite band was. Responses included Sinatra, Springsteen, Glen Miller, ACDC, and even Justin Bieber. Those who participated were either ran- domly called moments before the start of the event or they themselves called in directly to a phone number that had been widely publi- cized. The average time on the line of each caller was 12 minutes; the industry standard is eight minutes. Others participated via Facebook and Twitter. A recording of the tele- town hall is available at westchestergov.com. In addition, approximately 1,000 listeners responded to a poll question on the topic, “Do you think all county employees should pay a portion of the cost of their health care ben- efits?” Ninety-one percent said yes; 9 percent said no. (Submitted) County Executive Robert P. Astorino takes calls from the public during his tele-town hall meeting that drew more than 31,000 listeners. Contributed photo Harrison police arrested a man and charged him in conjunction with the theft of credit cards taken out of cars parked at Harrison Avenue School last month. John Francis Clark, 49, of Paramus N.J, was arrested outside of CVS on Halstead Avenue in Harrison on Dec. 3, and charged with two counts of grand larceny, a felony. Police Lt. Edward Lucas said the suspect is believed to have purchased $600 worth of American Express gift cards using credit cards that had been reported stolen on Nov. 16 and Nov. 21 from the parking lot of the Harrison Avenue School. Police were tracking stolen cards when one was used by Clark, who was arrested upon exiting the store. “We apprehended him at CVS immediately after he had made a purchase using one of the [stolen] cards,” Lucas said. Rye Police were notified of the arrest by Harrison Police due to the fact that munici- pality is investigating similar incidents within its borders. Credit card thefts are believed to have occurred Monday in the vicinity of Resurrection School and the Presbyterian Nursery School during afternoon dismissal, according to Rye Police Commissioner William Connors. Both schools are located on Boston Post Road near Rye High School. Connors said Rye hasn’t had any reported victims to date. However, he has received a few phone calls from residents and detectives are investigating. The suspect would see an unlocked car with a purse in it and then grab a credit card from inside, the commissioner said. Connors said there was no broken glass or forced entry to alert people. “It appears what he was doing was working his way in with the crowd at school pickup” the commissioner said. -Reporting by CHRISTIAN FALCONE and DANIEL OFFNER John Francis Clark was arrested on Monday in connection with a rash of stolen credit cards. Photo courtesy/Harrison Police Department
  • 6 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 Model Congress heads to capitol The Harrison High School Model Congress team competed at the Princeton Model Congress Conference in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 16-19 and collected 10 awards and a visit to the White House. Over 800 students from all over the country took place in this prestigious event. Harrison High School was the only public high school among the top five in conten- tion for the best/outstanding delegation award–an award Harrison won last year–and the only school without a model congress, speech or debate program as an academic class. After graduating 12 seniors in the Class of 2012, advisors Laryca Makarczuk and Meghan Orban expected this year to be one of rebuilding and strengthening. They were gobsmacked by the 10 awards the students received in Washington, even after two of the team’s strongest seniors were unable to attend as a result of SAT rescheduling conflicts. Freshman Catie DiRe’s bill, An Act to Abolish Drone Attacks, was passed in committee, in full session and signed into law by the president of the Princeton Model Congress. The Princeton Model Congress bestowed awards on: Rajan Mehra (co-president- 12th grade) – GAVEL Thomas Lovinger (co-president – 12th grade) – GAVEL and honorable mention Hunter Sable (11th grade) – GAVEL Ben Adler (11th grade) – honorable mention Sam Coangelo (11th grade) – honorable mention Aaron Kaplan (11th grade) – honorable mention Liliane Lindsay (11th grade) – honorable mention Daniel Maldonado (11th grade) – honorable mention Harrison Steins (10th grade) – honorable mention (Submitted) Harrison High School Model Congress poses in front of the White House gates. The group went on to win 10 awards at the Princeton Model Congress Conference in Washington, D.C. last month. Contributed photo NRHS alum host toy drive for Sandy victims The New Rochelle High School Class of 2003, in conjunction with the New Rochelle High School Class of 2013 Honor Society and G.O., is sponsoring the “Queen City of the Sound Hearts Queens” holiday toy drive to benefit the children of Breezy Point who have been af- fected by Hurricane Sandy. The drive is being sponsored with the help of Virginia’s House of Hope–a nonprofit organiza- tion based in New York City dedicated to helping needy children throughout the boroughs. All gifts should be new, unwrapped and appropriate for children ages 4-14. Pick-up date for toys will be Dec. 20. Toys will be delivered to Blessed Trinity Parish in Breezy Point Dec. 22. Drop-off locations: New Rochelle Public Library 1 Library Plaza In the Community Gallery during regular library hours New Rochelle High School 265 Clove Road Room 226 8 a.m. – 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. For more information about the toy drive and/or volunteer opportunities, email Deputy Editor Rachel McCain at NRHS2003@gmail.com. For more information on Virginia’s House of Hope, visit Virginiashouseofhope.org.
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 7 Mark Lungariello LUNGARIELLO AT LARGE Age polarization, continued In this space last week, I said the increasing gap between the fi nancial well-being of young and old Americans could be attributed only partly to the housing market collapse and a lack of equity for re- cent home buyers. But the housing collapse is only one factor in the age polarization in America. The increasing cost of college education may be having a ripple effect over the economic well- being of recent graduates. According to the John William Pope Center for Higher Education, the average debt for a graduating senior in 2007 was $23,200, which was a 24 percent increase from just 2004. Outstanding college loans now outnumber countrywide credit card debt. Poll data suggests that debt from tuition has affected career choices and staved off major purchases and even marriage for a number of recent graduates. The prospect of paying off those loans without the salary to cover monthly payments is a reality for the younger generation. According to a recent Pew Research Center study, for households headed by someone under 35, the median adjusted annual income in 1967 was $38,555, compared with $49,145 in 2010. That’s a 27 percent increase. Meanwhile, for households headed by someone over 65, the me- dian adjusted annual income in 1967 was $20,804, compared with $43,401 in 2010. That’s a 109 per- cent increase. The two trends heading in opposite directions suggests that there is more than the poor economy at play. An independent trend that is also increasing the gap of age-based well-being is the polarization of the U.S. job market. Simply put, low-skill service jobs have grown since the 1980s as computers and technology replaced specialized labor posi- tions. A study by David H. Autor and David Dorn in April 2012 focused on the growth of low skill service jobs. “Our results suggest a critical role for changes in labor specialization, spurred by the automation of routine task activities, as a driver of rising unemployment and wage polarization in the U.S. and potentially in other countries,” the paper stated. How the divide is, or can be, shaping the political landscape is an intriguing question. It is now com- monly known that Barack Obama won re-election with the highest unemployment rate–nearly 8 per- cent–of any candidate since the Great Depression. Pundits and political analysts have focused on the divergent voting trends of groups by ethnicity or sex. Non-white voters overwhelmingly favored Obama, while the shrinking white vote swung heavily for Obama’s opponent, Mitt Romney. The female vote also went heavily Democratic. But the youth vote is also shaping the popu- lar view of politics. There is a strong argument to be made that the youth vote swung highly in Obama’s favor not due to liberal social policies but because of a growing pro-government mindset. Paul Taylor, the executive vice president of Pew Research Center, told Andrew Benedict-Nelson of Insight Labs that there was a 34-percentage-point difference in 2008 between how 18-to-29 year olds voted and how 65-and-overs voted. “As recently as 10 years ago, there was no dif- ference between those two cohorts,” Taylor said, according to Benedict-Nelson. “So something very profound has happened.” Taylor said that in his center’s studies, researchers found “the parti- san age gap is bigger than it’s ever been.” The turnout gap between old and young vot- ers is shrinking. Traditionally, younger voters do not vote en masse and it is a former truism that younger voters are often leery of party affi liations and politics in general. The mammoth turnout in 2008 and a large showing in 2012 suggested that the youth vote is increasingly engaged in political parties and turning out in much greater favor be- hind the Obama administration and its policies. Young voters were more likely to vote Republican in 2012 than 2008, but still swung overwhelmingly Democrat. Voters aged 18 to 29 voted 60 percent to 30 percent in favor of Barack Obama, according to Washington Post exit polls. The young vote made up about 18 percent of the overall electorate and the 23 percent margin of victory among those under 30 years old was near- ly as signifi cant as the margin of defeat among voters in the 65 and above age group. The number was down from the 68-32 percent Democratic-Republican margin in 2008, but still represented a contrast when compared to voters of older age groups, who split closer to the 50 percent mark in the 30-to-44 demographic. Republican candidate Mitt Romney won the won among the 45-to-64 and 65-plus age groups. Although Obama, and Kerry before him, had strong showings in the range of 60 percent with the young vote, the under-30 crowd has not been a sure thing in terms of voting blue. In the 2000 election, the vote was split, with George W. Bush and Al Gore receiving 47 percent each (Ralph Nader received 6 percent). Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, in his fi rst election, had strong support among the youth vote, according to Gallup. The age divide may be the trickledown from the continued wage polarization in the country. According to Emmanuel Saez, in his March 2, 2012 piece entitled “Striking it Richer,” real income growth between 1993 to 2010 was 13.8 percent, but was 58 percent for the top 1 percent of incomes and just 6.4 percent for the bottom 99 percent of earners. Top earners had an 11.6 percent real income growth since the 2009-2010 economic recovery, while the bottom 99 percent rebounded a meager 0.2 percent. The overall wage increase is absorbed by such a small percentage of the population that effectively, the 99 percent are falling further and further behind the pace. Age polarization also seems to be widening the racial gap. According to the most recent job num- bers, there was a 21.4 percent unemployment rate among blacks aged 18 to 29, and a 13.4 percent unemployment rate among Hispanics aged 18 to 29. The number was well above the 12 percent unemployment rate for young workers in general, and jarringly higher than the 8 percent national unemployment rate. Reach Mark Lungariello at mark@hometwn.com.
  • 8 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 Mayor talks Sandy relief, town events Mayor Ron Belmont HARRISON HAPPENINGS In an effort to help communities hardest hit by Hurricane Sandy Harrison sixth grader, Faith Fuerst is collecting new and gently used books to donate to an elementary school in Freeport, Long Island. As Faith watched news coverage, of communities ravaged by the devastating effects of the storm, she began thinking of all the school libraries that were damaged. Faith loves to read and decided that she could help others, who enjoy read- ing, by facilitating a book drive. Books can be dropped off at the Harrison libraries or at Louis M. Klein Middle School. Harrison Youth Council is seeking new board members with specifi c skills. The Youth Council provides educational prevention pro- grams, parent support groups, presentations and professional support through individual, family and group counseling, as well as con- sultation and referral for families within the Harrison community. If you would like to serve the community by giving your time and expertise, and you have skills in the areas of public relations, de- velopment, or fi nancial management, please send your résumè to Lori Wilson, Board President via email wilsonlj@mac.com or by mail to Lori Wilson, Harrison Youth Council, 84 Calvert St., Harrison, N.Y. 10528. The Harrison Public Library will be hosting a variety of family program for the holiday sea- son. On Dec. 18, “movie time at the library” will begin at 3:30 p.m. with a children’s holi- day movie. Hot cocoa and homemade cookies will be served. A holiday craft program will be offered on Dec. 20 at 4 p.m. and on Dec. 26 at 10:30 a.m. For additional information, log on to harrisonpl.org. On a related note, the West Harrison Christmas tree lighting and holiday celebra- tion will be held on Friday evening at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 7, with a rain date of Dec 9. I would like to take this opportunity to up- date residents on storm damage relief options. The U.S. Small Business Administration, Offi ce of Disaster Assistance is currently working to make sure that Hurricane Sandy survivors are aware of the SBA disaster loan program. SBA offers federal disaster loans to homeowners and renters for disaster related losses. Individuals, unable to qualify for an SBAS loan, may be referred to FEMA for ad- ditional grant assistance. Survivors should fi rst register with FEMA by calling 1-800-621-3362 or 1-800-621-FEMA. People affected by Hurricane Sandy can reg- ister or get help online at DisasterAssistance. gov or they may visit any disaster recovery center. There is currently a disaster recovery cen- ter at the Westchester County Center at 198 Central Ave. in White Plains, N.Y. 10606. Staff is available at the center to answer ques- tions or assist with completing an SBA disas- ter loan application. Additional details on the locations of Disaster Recovery Centers and the loan application process can be obtained by calling the SBA Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 (800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing) or by sending an email to disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Loan applications can be downloaded from sba. gov. Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, Texas 76155. zone arose last year when inspectors with the town Building Department issued violations for running a commercial business within the two-family residential “B” zone. Oakland Avenue resident Roy Aletti, who has spoken out against the proposed rezon- ing several times in the past year, reiterated that the B zone was rezoned in 1974 so that no commercial expansion could be done to the location. “Sometimes, things with the best intent go awry,” Aletti said. “This should’ve been cut out of the master plan.” According to Aletti, the commercial busi- nesses which have operated along Oakland Avenue since the 1970s, have been perpetually “abusing” their non-conforming status for sev- eral years. “Get in there and straighten it out,” Aletti told Town Council members. Residents in West Harrison also addressed concerns about “possible redevelopment” list- ed within the draft for the Lake Street Quarry site. Lake Street resident Sam Fanelli questioned the board on whether they intended to change the zoning of the area from the existing single family residential or “R-1” zone status. “Development could mean anything,” Fanelli PLAN from page 1 said, “as long as we’re not pushing for new de- velopment of commercial property.” Republican Councilman Steve Malfi tano said that in order for anything to evolve, there it would need to meet the approval of the neigh- bors. Purchase resident Ted Demirjian asked the board on the consultant’s suggestion proposing a roundabout at the intersection of Anderson Hill Road and Purchase Street as a way to ease traffi c. “The master plan doesn’t mention how this would be addressed or remedied,” Demirjian said. “Would the road be widened to two lanes? Obviously, this would impact the way any cars would go in and out of Anderson Hill Road.” At the conclusion of the hearing, residents re- quested the council perform an Environmental Impact Statement prior to the approval of a new master plan. The approval of the new master plan will not come easily. The last redraft was in 1987 and a draft put together in 2007 was shelved amid resident concerns and only resurrected last March. The guidance of a plan is non-binding, but offers a guiding map for direction of devel- opment and zoning within a community. The hearing on the draft master plan will continue into the next council meeting on Dec. 20.
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 9 Local doctors discuss brain health at symposium By ALEXANDRA BOGDANOVIC STAFF REPORTER alexandra@hometwn.com Moderate exercise, getting enough sleep, mental and social stimulation and maintain- ing good cardiac health are all keys to keep- ing the brain healthy as we age, according to local health experts. Doctors John H. Morrison and Rajiv R. Ratan provided tips during a Dec. 1 seminar on the subject at the Westchester County Center in White Plains. Addressing the audience during the two- hour presentation, Morrison, a dean of basic sciences and dean of the Graduate School of Biological Sciences at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, began by explaining the brain’s basic function. In simple terms, the brain is an organ of behavior, he said. It processes incoming information and allows us to adopt our behavior to our perceptions of the outside world. The part of our brain in charge of “ex- ecutive function” that allows us to make decisions, reason and pay attention to de- tails, and the part of our brain in charge of learning memory, which allows us to recall life experiences, are both affected by aging, Morrison said. Its effects on the synapses in the hippo- campus can be manifested in “forgetful- ness,” Morrison explained. For instance, according to the doctor, someone may have trouble remembering where he or she parked his or her car. When the synapses in the prefrontal cortex are affect- ed, people can have trouble navigating their daily lives. In such cases, someone may have trouble getting home from the store, even though they’ve driven the route thousands of times before. Common forgetfulness differs from dementia, which is defined as the loss of life- time memories, the inability to form new memories, the loss of sense of identity and eventually, the ability to rea- son, Morrison said. Although aging affects all organs, Ratan, a professor of neurology and neuroscience and an associate dean at the Weill Cornell Medical College, said brain plasticity or the alteration of some brain synapses, and generation of new neurons, can be shaped to “resist” diseases and normal changes associated with aging by providing “positive training.” Diet, exercise and “cognitive training” can all help ward off the effects of aging that are caused by free radicals or toxins that accumu- late in our bodies as we age, he said. “Exercise for 30 min- utes every other day at moderate intensity in- creases vascular fitness and helps with manage- ment of diabetes,” Ratan said. “There are also known areas in the brain where new neurons are born as we exercise.” Although we sleep less as we age, getting the proper kind of sleep is an important factor in maintaining brain health, Ratan said. Some studies have shown that toxins are suppressed during “deep sleep,” he explained. Morrison also said that increased men- tal activity helps maintain brain health. Something as simple as playing bridge can be beneficial. Maintaining a strong sup- port system by socializing with friends, family and other peer groups is also important, he said. Both Morrison and Ratan emphasized the importance of “heart health,” since stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States. A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is disrupted, and multiple strokes can result in dementia, Ratan said. Risk fac- tors for stroke include high blood pressure, smoking and high lipid levels, he said. The good news is that getting to the hos- pital for appropriate treatment quickly can minimize the damage caused by strokes, he added. Dr. Sheree L. Loftus, a nurse scien- tist at Take Charge Through Exercise in Pleasantville, said she enjoyed the presenta- tion, but wished Ratan and Morrison would have shared more recommendations for healthy aging with the audience. “I do brain-aging research and there is so much information out there,” she said. Verna Marcovici of Scarsdale said she also enjoyed the presentation, which was sponsored by the AARP of New York and the Dana alliance for Brain Initiatives. “I liked the presentation. It was very in- formative. The brain is amazing – it is so mysterious,” she said. Marcovici said she was especially re- lieved to learn that something as simple as bridge can help maintain brain health. “I play bridge,” she said. Dr. Rajiv Ratan, the executive director of Burke Medical Research Institute, is one of the health professionals who discussed ways to keep the brain healthy while aging during a symposium on the subject at the Westchester County Center in White Plains Dec. 1. Photo courtesy/Burke.org
  • 10 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 Rye runners come out for annual “Turkey Run” On Nov. 24, runners of all ages came to the Rye Recreational Center to take park in the 36th Annual Turkey Run. The event featured treks of various miles, such as the 1-mile “Fun Run” and the 5.2K Turkey Run. Ready, set go! Participants line up for the 1-mile “Fun Run” at the Rye Recreational Center. The start of the Paw Trot at the Recreation Center in Rye Nov. 24. A sign notifying participants of the 36th annual Turkey Run activities. Three young participants are all smiles just minutes before the start of the Fun Run Nov. 24 at the 36th annual Turkey Run. Runners and supporters attended the 36th annual Turkey Run at the Rye Recreational Center. Alexandra Swiatocha of Somers is the first female finisher in the 5.2K Turkey Run at the Rye Recreational Center. Photos/Bobby Begun
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 11 State job numbers bring optimism to merchants By ALEXANDRA BOGDANOVIC STAFF REPORTER alexandra@hometwn.com With a tumultuous autumn in the rear view mirror and October job numbers showing im- provement, some area retailers are optimistic about the holiday shopping season. The statistics released by the state Labor Department Nov. 20 show New York State added 5,900 private sector jobs and the number of unemployed dropped by 17,500 in October. The statewide unemployment rate fell from 8.9 percent to 8.7 percent. Because the numbers are not “seasonally adjusted,” the state Labor Department said the most valid comparisons with this type of data are year-to-year comparisons of the same month. A closer look at the data reveals the un- employment rate in the Putnam-Westchester- Rockland region was 6.9 percent this October, as compared to 6.5 percent in October 2011. In Westchester alone, the unemployment rate was 7.1 percent this October as compared to 6.5 percent last October. Even so, the county’s October 2012 figure reflects slight improvement from the previous month, when the unemployment rate stood at 7.3 percent. In Rye, merchants reported a successful start to the holiday shopping season Dec. 2, but said it was too soon to say whether the positive news on the job front has definitely boosted consumer confidence in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and a divisive national election. “The enthusiasm has been evident and we’ve definitely been picking up on it,” said Heidi Price, manager of the Walin and Wolff boutique on Purchase Street. “I’d say we’re on par if not a little bit better in terms of sales that we were in comparison with the first weekend in December last year, but the next couple of weeks will be a better indicator of how things are going.” Rob Gillick, who was working behind the counter at Parker’s on Purchase Street, also said sales there were keeping pace with or slightly better than those made on the first Saturday in December last year. In Bronxville, Louisa McTurner, the owner of Weezie D ladies boutique on Park Place, said she and her staff members are “very ex- cited” about the holiday shopping season, and reported increased sales in comparison with the same time period last year. “I think our clients are very excited about the holidays,” McTurner said Dec. 3. “It’s very festive here and you just can’t get around it.” Customers are shopping for a lot of “special occasion” dresses and finding them at reason- able prices, according to McTurner. The shop also carries a lot of “fun pieces” and receives new shipments all the time, she added. Maria DiLeonardo, owner of Sirens bou- tique on Mamaroneck Avenue in Mamaroneck, said she has no reason to believe this holiday season will be different from any of the others she had since she started her business back in 2002. “This is my 10th year in business and I’ve never had a bad Christmas,” she said. “I never had an issue even through the recession.” DiLeonardo, who said she has a “very close relationship” with her clients, said she doesn’t forget that some people only have a $10 to $15 budget for gift giving, and offers merchandise at various price points to match their needs. “Each year, I’ve been here has been stron- ger for me,” said DiLeonardo, adding that she works long hours and keeps the shop open until 8 p.m. on Christmas Eve in order to ac- commodate last-minute shoppers. While DiLeonardo remains hard at work, the state Labor Department statistics show thousands of people rejoined the workforce in the 12-month cycle between October 2011 and 2012. During that time, the state’s pri- vate sector job count increased by more than 133,000 and the number of initial claims for unemployment in New York State fell from 102,041 to 93,645, or 8.2 percent. Rye’s shopping district pictured during the spring. Local job numbers released by the state Department of Labor have Westchester retailers hoping for strong sales during the holiday shopping season. File photo
  • 12 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 REAL ESTATE HARRISON - 1,000 s.f. office, priv.ent. 24/7 use. 2 priv. offices + 1 sm.office, Recept/clerical area, shared meeting room, kitchen and bathroom. $900/mo + util. Call Owner 914-698-5831 MAMARONECK – Mod. Elev. Prof. Bldg, Private office with shared use of attractive waiting rm, 2 bathrms, kitchenette, copy rm.& lg.conf. room. Full time $850/mo. + util. or can rent fur- nished for p/t use. Call Owner – 914-698-5831 LAND and FARMS WANTED. Serious cash buyer seeks investment property, 200 acres and up, with or without mineral rights. Brokers welcome. For immediate confiden- tial response, call 607�563�8875 ext.13 or e mail alan@newyorklandandlakes.com. HELP WANTED Driver-$0.01 increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. Choose your ho- metime. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recentexperience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com ADOPTION ADOPT Loving and stable home for your baby. Beautiful life, much loveto share. Devoted, married couple. Expenses paid. Call forinformation, Gina/ Walt: 1-800- 315-6957 ADOPT: Kindergarten teacher longs to give your precious baby endless love, se- cure home, large extended family, bright future. Expenses paid. Private.Legal.Jenny 1�866�751�3377 WANTED TO BUY 0 CAR DONATIONS/BREAST CANCER! Free Towing, 24/7. Non-Runners OK. TaxDeductible. $100 on GROCERY/ R E S T A U R A N T C O U P O N S F r e e Mammograms &Cancer Information www. DriveOutBreastCancer.org UNITED BREAST CANCERFOUNDATION 877-822-8287 BUYING/SELLING: gold, gold coins, sterling silver, silver coins, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek, Phillippe), paint- ings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917�696�2024 JAY Wanted: Will Pay up to $15.00 for High School Yearbooks 1900-2012. Any School/ Any State. www.yearbookusa.com or 214- 514-1040 SITUATIONS/SERVICES HAS YOUR BUILDING SUFFERED STRUCTURAL DAMAGE FROM THE RECENT WEATHER? Contact Woodford Brothers for structural repairs on all types of buildings. At 1�800� 653�2276 or WWW.Woodfordbros.com START NOW! OPEN RED HOT DOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX, DISCOUNT PARTY,$10 CLOTHING STORE, TEEN STORE, FITNESS CENTER FROM $51,900WORLDWIDE! WWW.DRSS16.COM 1-800-518-3064 AIRLINES ARE HIRING –Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approvedpro- gram. Financial aid if qualified -Job place- ment assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance 866-296-7093 Green Scapes, Inc. Environmentally friend- ly bulk treated Salt, De�Icing liquids, bulk Mulch, Compost, Deco�stone, Boulders, Pavers, Wallstone and more. Visit our Website: www.greenscapesonline.com. 315.469.0007. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *CriminalJustice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available.Financial Aid if quali- fied. SCHEV Authorized. Call 888-201-8657 www.CenturaOnline.com EXPERIENCED TRIAL ATTORNEY– Criminal, Civil and Family Law – FORMER CHIEF PROSECUTOR-20+ years experience – Excelle nt results on difficult cases-Free consultation- Offices in Westchester/Bronx-Contact Michael 718-293-2222 or mbarskyla w@verizon.net ADVANTAGE COMPUTER SUPPORT–We make your computer “people friendly” in your home or office. Fast Resopnse * Upgrades * Repairs * Network Support. Call Richard Klein 914-422-1798 or 203-781-8672. FOR SALE SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1 800 578 1363 Ext.300N POODLE PUPPIES MINIATURE CREAMS Veterinary owned and bred. Show parents/ AKC Registered 2 year guarantee. 1st set of shots. Exquisite. pics on: petmendpuppies.com Inquiries: drdemasi@yahoo.com or 420-3463 The Classifieds DEADLINE Placement, correction or cancellation of an ad may be phoned in any time before noon on Monday for publication HOW TO REACH US (914) 653-1000x25 • Fax: 653-5000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: 200 William Street, Port Chester OUR RATES: UP TO 4 LINES $42.50 for 2 weeks minimum. Each Additional Line $2.00 Advertising that gets results TOP CASH PAID FOR: Antiques, furniture, paintings, lamps, china, crystal, coins, sterling, watches, sewing machines, clothing, handbags, jewelry, cameras, records, books, base- ball items, old toys/games. Call J. Geller – 914-275-6611 or gellerent@aol.com
  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 13 Letters Generator use can be inconsiderate NEWS TIPS Unfortunately, our reporters cannot be everywhere. If you see news in the making or have an idea for a news story, call us. Community reporters and correspondence are listed at left. LETTERS The community’s opinion matters. If you have a view to express, simply write a letter to the editor by email to mark@hometwn.com, fax or mail. Please include a phone number and name for verification purposes. Word limit: 625. No unsolicited Op/Eds, food, film reviews. COMMUNITY EVENTS If you have an event you would like to share with the community, send it via email to news@hometwn.com. Deadline for community news is noon on Fridays. Space is not guaranteed. Send listings to news@hometwn.com. DELIVERY For home delivery, call Marcia Schultz at (914) 653-1000 x25. CONTRIBUTORS: Alexandra Bogdanovic, Jason Chirevas, Christian Falcone, Ashley Helms POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Harrison Report, c/o HomeTown Media Group, 200 William St., Port Chester, N.Y. 10573 The Harrison Report is published weekly for a subscription price of $30 per year by Home Town Media Group, 200 William St., Port Chester, N.Y. 10573. Standard Postage is paid at White Plains, New York 200 WILLIAM ST., PORT CHESTER, N.Y. 10573 • Tel: (914) 653-1000 Fax: (914) 653-5000 Howard Sturman Publisher x21 publisher@hometwn.com Mark Lungariello Editor-in-Chief x19 mark@hometwn.com Rachel McCain Deputy Editor x30 news@hometwn.com Mike Smith Assoc. Sports Editor x22 sports@hometwn.com Marcia Shultz Subscriptions, Classifieds x25 Advertising Coordinator x27 marcia@hometwn.com ads@hometwn.com Daniel Offner Reporter x26 dan@hometwn.com Lindsay Sturman Advertising Account Manager x14 lsturman@hometwn.com Bobby Begun Photographer Arthur Gedin Art Director x24 art1@hometwn.com To the Editor, Our street (and most of Rye) did not have power, heat or phones for a full 12 days after Hurricane Sandy. During this time, one of our neighbors had a very large and loud generator running 24/7. While we understood that this was a time of crisis, my father is an employee of the MTA and was called to go into work from day one. He had to get up at 4 a.m. every morning to make it to New York City to help out, however, he and the rest of the family found it impossible to sleep with the generator running next door. This generator is placed strategically right next to the divid- ing fence between the properties and away from my neighbor’s house with a detached garage in between to buffer the noise for them. For us, this was a nightmare as the vibrations visibly shook our windows. We had concerns regarding the location before but because we never had such a blackout, we dismissed them when- ever the generator was in use for only a few hours at a time. We respectfully asked our neighbors the first night if they wouldn’t mind shutting it off for a mere three hours so that my father could get some sleep before heading into the city. Their response was to tell us that they had hundreds of dollars worth of food in their fridge and could not let it spoil. We pointed out that it would not spoil in three hours if they did not open the fridge and that the rest of the block would inevitably lose their own food within the next two days. They still refused, claiming they did not know how to turn it off. This upset us at their lack of sympathy when my father was losing sleep on behalf of fellow New Yorkers including our neighbors. After a few days of trying to deal with the noise and cold, we were forced to abandon ship and live in my sister’s apartment. On one of the last nights without power, we attempted to move back home and sleep, but the generator still proved to be intolerable and my father lost his temper. He went over and demanded to know why nothing had been done about the noise at night and asked angrily again to please turn it off for three hours. They claimed they did not know how to shut it off and suggested we use earplugs. By Thanksgiving, thankfully, life in Rye was returning to nor- mal. However, for no apparent reason, the generator went off again next door–even though the power was on. My sister went over to see what was going on and in a minute they managed to turn it off, which brought on shaking of the heads from us. We have asked Rye police to help us talk to them, but we were told that “they couldn’t find the house,” which is rather silly con- sidering it was the only one with power and directly in front of a known intersection before admitting that we simply had to deal with the noise. While we understand it was a crisis, there is a law in Rye that states that if a noise is above a certain Hertz, there could be a fine. We obviously don’t have the equipment to measure how loud it is, nor do we wish a fine on our neighbors, but would like to know if everyone else with generators was this stubborn during Sandy? Was it unreasonable of us to ask them to turn it off for the three hours a night? And can something be done about the location and the hours of operation for the future? Sarah Lee, Rye Kelly is a 2-3 year old female Beagle Mix around 25 pounds. She is acclimating to her foster home, which in- cludes three children, two dogs and two cats. Kelly is very alert, inquisitive and intelligent and gets along very well with everyone she meets. She is learning to respond to her name and also working on her basic commands. Kelly en- joys being in a crate and is making progress on her house- training. Kelly is spayed, vaccinated, dewormed, heartworm tested and micro-chipped. The adoption donation for Kelly is $250. To learn more, contact Larchmont Pet Rescue at (914) 834-6955 or visit NY-PetRescue.org.
  • 14 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 Business Briefs At Home on the Sound membership drive underway and professional achievement. A publication of Thomson Reuters, Super Lawyers selects attorneys using a rigorous, multiphase pro- cess that includes independent research, peer nominations and peer evaluations. Selections are made on an annual, state-by-state basis. “Rising Stars” features top up-and-coming attorneys who are 40 years of age and under or who have been practicing for 10 years or less. Up to 5 percent of the lawyers in the state are named by Super Lawyers; 2.5 percent are named to the “Rising Stars” list. Andrew E. Blustein, partner/director and chair of the Health Care Information and Technology and Insurance Regulatory Practice Groups, is also co-chair of the HIPAA Compliance Group and a member of the Health Care, Business, and Compliance and White Collar Defense Practice Groups. His practice includes the representation of hospitals, physicians, clinics and other health care industry-related clients (both for profit and not-for-profit). He also assists insurance companies and other clients in developing provider networks and in addressing various regulatory issues. Blustein has been listed in Super Lawyers for three years. For more information about Super Lawyers, visit super- lawyers.com. Sound Shore Medical Center appoints faculty practice physician Sound Shore Medical Center is pleased to an- nounce the appointment of Anna Kazanskaya to its faculty practice in in- ternal medicine, located at 830 Pelhamdale Ave. in New Rochelle. In her new position, Kazanskaya will bring her expertise, healthcare philosophy and caring to patients 18 years of age and older. Kazanskaya is board certified in both in- ternal medicine and geriatric medicine. She is a Cum Laude graduate of Petrozavodsk State University School of Medicine and completed her internal medicine residency at Sound Shore Medical Center in New Rochelle, where she was selected to serve as chief resident. Kazanskaya was then awarded a prestigious fellowship in geriatric medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University. Upon completion, she returned to the Northeast and was in private practice for five years before returning to New Rochelle and accepting a medical staff position at Sound Shore Medical Center. Kazanskaya has practiced medicine in the New Rochelle area since 2001 and is an assistant professor of clinical medicine at New York Medical College. Kazanskaya can be reached at the New Rochelle office during regular hours: Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. The office telephone number is (914) 636-5110. Westchester Squash opens in Mamaroneck Squash is a sport that has been around for centuries, and recently interest has been grow- ing at a phenomenal rate. In 2003, Forbes rat- ed squash as the number one healthiest sport to play. It combines the athletic elements of At Home on the Sound is offering new members a reduced membership fee during the month of December. New members who join before Dec. 31 will receive 20 percent off the regular annual fee of $370 per year for an individual and $495 per year for a household. At Home on the Sound is a nonprofit com- munity organization that strives to improve the quality of life for adults ages 60 and over in Mamaroneck and Larchmont. At Home on the Sound offers its members cultural and social programs such as lectures, trips, classes and workshops; individualized services such as Medicare counseling; access to pre-screened, reliable home maintenance professionals; free transportation to medical appointments and errands; and more. Some popular programs include a weekly gentle yoga class, current events club, a “Dine-About,” and Senior Scenes–an improvisational theater workshop. Established in 2010, At Home on the Sound was created through a grass roots effort by lo- cal residents who felt passionately that they and others like them should have a support system to help them continue to enjoy a vi- brant, independent lifestyle while remaining in their own homes and staying connected to the Sound Shore community. At Home on the Sound is part of a growing national trend to support and promote aging-in-place. For more information about membership or volunteer opportunities, call (914) 899-3150 or visit athomeonthesound.org. New Rochelle resident among New York “Super Lawyers” Garfunkel Wild is pleased to announce that 11 Garfunkel Wild attor- neys have been selected for inclusion in the 2012 New York Super Lawyers – Metro Edition. These include founding partner/ chairman Robert Andrew Wild and partner/director Andrew E. Blustein, a resident of New Rochelle, among many oth- ers. Super Lawyers is a listing of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition agility, endurance, hand-eye coordination and precise strategy into one game. Adults and kids of all ages are playing the sport, with exceptional growth among high school and middle school players, as well as college students. Westchester Squash, located at 628 Fayette Ave. in Mamaroneck offers four international courts and a coaching staff that has developed players from beginner to the most elite ju- nior national and international levels. David Palmer, former World No. 1 and two-time World Champion and multiple British Open Champion, is a partner and one of the owners of Westchester Squash. Members enjoy access to weekly league play, round robins, and arranged skill level matches. Junior Day Camps are also avail- able for kids of all playing levels, to improve their technical skills while enjoying a fun day of squash. The next Junior Day Camps will be held on Election Day and Veterans Day. Westchester Squash hosts U.S. Squash tour- naments (upcoming U.S. Bronze on Dec. 7- 9), coaches teams of several area schools, and holds summer camps for juniors. For more information, call (914) 698-0095 or visit westchestersquash.com. Mamaroneck Artists Guild ushers in the new year in style The Mamaroneck Artist Guild ushers in the new year with “Black & White” – a new exhibition of work with black and white as the theme opening on Jan. 9, 2013 and running through Jan. 26, 2013. Artist members will exhibit works in a wide variety of media including oil, watercolor, printmaking, fiber, photography, jewelry, mixed media and sculpture. Meet the artists and celebrate the new year and this new exhibition of fine art at an open- ing reception on Jan. 12, 2013 from 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday from 12 p.m. – 5 p.m. The gallery is located at 126 Larchmont Ave. in Larchmont. Admission is free. Coldwell Banker offices donate items for Hurricane Sandy victims The Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office in Rye is pleased to have recently par- ticipated in relief efforts for Hurricane Sandy victims by collecting and donating a variety of items. Among the items collected were: towels, blankets, batteries, cleaning supplies and school supplies. The donations were made to Catholic Charities of New York to be distributed to people on Staten Island affected by the hur- ricane. Another truckload of donated supplies was delivered to Brooklyn residents who needed assistance. The Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office in Rye was one of five Coldwell Banker offices in Westchester County that participated in the collection drive. Burke Rehabilitation Hospital to host food, coat drive for holidays In order to help those in need during the holiday season, Burke Rehabilitation Hospital will sponsor a food and coat drive at its main campus and satellite centers throughout Westchester County and the Bronx. The drive will take place from Nov. 19 through Dec. 31. Donated food will be distrib- uted through the Food Bank for Westchester and the coats by NY Cares. Both organiza- tions are uniquely positioned to ensure the donations go to those in our community who need assistance. Non-perishable, unexpired food will be collected at all of Burke’s locations. Items needed by the Food Bank for Westchester are can openers, cans of tuna, granola bars, peanut butter in plastic jars, condensed or powdered milk, cheese or peanut butter crack- ers, juice boxes, applesauce and fruit cups in plastic containers, toilet paper, hand sanitizer and wipes, tissues, soups and other meals in a can. The Food bank cannot accept food in glass jars. The general public can drop off items at the following locations: • White Plains - Burke Rehabilitation Hospital Lobby Wood Pavilion, 785 Mamaroneck Ave. • White Plains - Burke Rehabilitation Hospital Building No. 8, Outpatient Services • White Plains - Burke Rehabilitation Hospital Building No. 4, Billings Building • Mamaroneck - Burke Rehabilitation Outpatient Clinic, 703 W. Boston Post Road • Purchase - Burke Rehabilitation Outpatient Clinic, 3020 Westchester Ave. • Bronx - Burke Rehabilitation Outpatient Clinic, 2826 Westchester Ave. To learn more about how you can help dur- ing the drive, call (914) 597-2848. Send us your Business News! The next Business Briefs section will run on Jan. 4. Please send any submission for our January issue to biz@hometwn.com by Friday, Dec. 28. Each submission can include one pic- ture and must be between 175-225 words. If you have any questions, email Deputy Editor Rachel McCain at news@hometwn.com. 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  • December 7, 2012 • THE HARRISON REPORT • 15SPORTS Icing the competition Players to watch this hockey season points in the section. So far, Barry’s start has been slower than Ramondelli’s. The latter already has 5 goals and 2 as- sists, but when the two start clicking again, other teams might be in trouble. Michael Benincasa, Rye The Rye senior was a bright spot for the Garnets last season, serving as Rye’s grand facilitator. In the 2011- 2012 season, Benincasa had 33 assists, putting him just behind Ramondelli for third place in the section. If Benincasa can continue his strong play this winter, he can help the Garnets develop a core of scorers around him, making Rye a well-rounded team. Brian Ketchebaw, Rye Town/Harrison Ketchebaw may have spent last season backing up his older brother Jamie, but the time has come for the younger Ketchebaw to get his shot. Last year, in limited time, the Rye Town/Harrison netminder allowed just 6 goals on 81 shots, earning himself a goals-against average of 1.81 on the year. In the Titans’ only game so far, Ketchebaw allowed just 2 goals, despite being peppered (unofficially) by over 30 shots. For a Titan team that lost 10 seniors to graduation, having a steady hand in goal will be a major plus. Trey Herlitz-Ferguson, Mamaroneck At 6 foot 3, Mamaroneck’s forward pres- ents a tall order for opposing defenses hop- ing to keep him off the stat sheet. Through three games this season, nobody’s been able to stop the senior, who has already tallied 9 scores–four more than he scored last year. Last season, Mamaroneck suffered something of a down year without a true top-line scoring threat. If Herlitz-Ferguson can emerge as that piece of the puzzle, the Tigers could be tough to stop. Chris Ramondelli/Brett Barry, New Rochelle Ramondelli and Barry helped the Huguenots take big steps forward last season, and they should once again be factors in the Division 1 landscape with another year of varsity ex- perience under their belts. Last season, both Ramondelli and Barry were fixtures on the tops of the leaderboards, and finished third and sixth, respectively, for the most overall New Rochelle’s Brett Barry skates against Eastchester- Tuckahoe-Bronxville in a sectional game in February 2012. Barry is back this year, alongside teammate Chris Ramondelli, to provide the Huguenots with a strong 1-2 punch. Photo/Mike Smith Cheerleaders win big The Harrison High School varsity cheerleaders are once again on top following two first place finishes and a second place finish in the large division at the County Center Championships at the Westchester County Center on Nov. 19. The cheering Huskies finished in first place on Nov. 17 at the Eastchester Invitational. This follows their first place at Beacon High School in the Fall Westchester, Putnam, Dutchess, Rockland County Cheerleading Coaches Association Competition. (Submitted) The Harrison High School varsity cheerleaders pose at the Eastchester Invitational. The squad went on to win two first place finishes and a second place finish at the County Center Championships last month. Contributed photo Harrison Huskies ATHLETE OF THE WEEK David Polakoff By MIKE SMITH ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR sports@hometwn.com Entering his fourth year on the Harrison wrestling squad, David Polakoff has just one goal for him- self for the 2012-2013 season: win a section crown. The 145 pounder has improved steadily since his rookie campaign at 112 pounds, and now, in his last go-around with the Huskies, he is looking for his shot at the state tournament. Polakoff is off to a good start so far, be- ginning the season going 6-0 at the annual Port Chester tournament, and the senior feels comfortable with the weight he’s wrestling at right now. “I feel the strongest I’ve ever been,” said Polakoff. “Right now, I feel like I can match up with anyone in the section.” The Husky has been keep- ing his eyes on the 145-pound landscape, and said that while there’s not one particular challenger who worries him, he is following the season of Fox Lane’s Tyler Grippi, who hasn’t committed to a weight yet. “At Port Chester, he wrestled at the weight class above me,” said Polakoff. “So I’m not sure where he’s going yet.” As for his teammate, Polakoff hopes to be a leader that will help the younger Huskies strive to improve on the mat. “When we wrestle other teams, I want them to know who we are,” said the senior. “I want them to be afraid to lose.”
  • 16 • THE HARRISON REPORT • December 7, 2012 SPORTS Rye Town/Harrison Titans drop opener to Raiders By MIKE SMITH ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR sports@hometwn.com On Nov. 30, the Rye Town/Harrison Titans kicked off the 2012-2013 season with a tough loss to a good Scarsdale hockey team. But despite the defeat–and the prospect of a sea- son that might prove to be tumultuous as the weeks leading up to the campaign–this young Titans team appears to be poised for success. Taking on the Raiders at Murray’s Ice Rink in Yonkers, the Titans fell behind quickly in the first period and were never able to estab- lish their game against an aggressive attack by Scarsdale, falling to the Raiders 2-1. Titans’ coach Brian Rabinowitz, however, saw plenty of positives in his team’s first game and be- lieves that soon enough, the squad will be able to turn things around. “I was definitely pleased,” said the head coach. “I thought that the effort was good–we played with the intensity we needed, and with 10 new guys on the team, losing as many se- niors as we did, that was a good start.” Rabinowitz was especially impressed with sophomore goaltender Brian Ketchebaw’s performance. Ketchebaw, taking over start- ing goalie duties from his older brother Jamie who graduated last spring, was superb on the night. Ketchebaw made roughly 30 saves (both Rabinowitz and Scarsdale coach Jim Mancuso took issue with the official scorers at the game, who gave Ketchebaw just 18 saves. Mancuso filed a protest on the Titans’ behalf). The Rye Playland Ice Rink, pictured here, was supposed to be the Titans’ home ice this season. Superstorm Sandy, which hit in October, has rendered the rink inoperable, forcing Rye Town/Harrison to search for ice time elsewhere. Photo/Bobby Begun Jake Picker leads the charge against Scarsdale on Nov. 30. Picker will be one of the Titans tabbed with getting the offense going this season. “He may be young, but he plays the game with the ability and maturity of a senior,” said Rabinowitz of his netminder. “He’s going to be a stud and he stood on his head against a very good Scarsdale team.” Aside from his goaltender, Rabinowitz, a first-year head coach, is still getting to know his players, though a few, such as senior Ian Bass and sophomore Dom Brescia will be key to the Titan’s success this year. “With this being a mixed-school program, we’re still learning what we have,” said the head coach. “But we’re going to need contri- butions from guys like [Jake] Picker, Jacob Chalfin and Mitch Milbauer and other guys as well.” Perhaps the biggest obstacle facing the Titans this year isn’t its youth, but the fact that the team–like its rivals from Rye–will be without a single home game the entire season. October’s Superstorm Sandy has rendered the teams’ home venue, Playland, unusable for the season, prompting both Rye Town/ Harrison and Rye to look for ice time in order to fill out their schedules. To date, the Titans have rescheduled all but two of their games, and find themselves playing home contests all over Westchester County and beyond. The team’s Jan. 18 game against the Garnets will be held in Norwalk’s SoNo Ice House. “We don’t have home ice and that’s not ideal,” said Rabinowitz. “But these kids are resilient. It’s not bothering them at all, they’re just looking to play hockey.” Goalie Brian Ketchebaw looks at the action down-ice against Scarsdale. Ketchebaw had around 30 saves against the Raiders, should a protest of the official scorers be upheld. Photos/Mike Smith
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