Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Overview Presented by: and PBIS Leadership Forum October 2012 Acknowledgements to: Rob Horner & Steve Newton, University.

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  • Slide 1
  • Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Overview Presented by: and PBIS Leadership Forum October 2012 Acknowledgements to: Rob Horner & Steve Newton, University of Oregon and Bob Algozzine & Kate Algozzine at University of North Carolina at Charlotte www.uoecs.org
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  • Maximizing Your Session Participation Consider 4 questions: Where are we in our implementation? What do I hope to learn? What did I learn? What will I do with what I learned?
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  • 810,000 hours of meetings 4,050,000 hours of personal time annually
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  • Problem Solving Components (Bransford & Stein, 1984) I I dentify the problem D D efine the problem E E x pl or e p os si bl e so lu ti o ns a n d se le ct a p pr o pr ia te st ra te g y A A ct on the strategy L L ook back and evaluate the effects of activities
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  • To what extent do teams follow problem solving steps and include critical components? Include a behavioral definition of target behavior Have a direct measure of the target behavior prior to intervention Include a step-by-step intervention plan Graph intervention results Compare pre-intervention and post- intervention performance Develop a hypothesized reason for the problem Gather evidence that the intervention was implemented as designed Team members rated implementation as higher than observers with observers rating identifying antecedents and consequences for behavior, identifying data to monitor progress, scheduling a follow up meeting as unmet (Telzow, McNamara, & Hollinger, 2000)
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  • Problem Out of Time Solution Organizing for an Effective Problem Solving Conversation Use Data A key to collective problem solving is to provide a visual context that allows everyone to follow and contribute
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  • People arent tired from solving problems they are tired from solving the same problem over and over. 7 Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.
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  • Action Planning Action Planning Improving Decision-Making Problem Solution Problem From To Problem Solving Information Solution
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  • Decision are more likely to be effective and efficient when they are based on data Quality of decision-making depends most on the first step (defining the problem to be solved) Data help us ask the right questionthey do not provide the answers: Use data to identify problems, refine the problems, and define the questions that lead to solutions Data help place the problem in the context rather than in students Main Ideas
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  • Build decision systems not data systems Use data in decision layers (a) Is there a problem? (b) Localize the problem (location, problem behavior, students, time of day), and (c) Get specific Do not drown in data Be efficient It is OK to be doing well! More Main Ideas
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  • The process a team uses is important Roles Facilitator Recorder Data analystActive Member Organization Agenda, old business, new business, action plan for decisions What happens BEFORE a meetingWhat happens DURING a meetingWhat happens AFTER a meeting More Main Ideas
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  • What do we need? A clear model with steps for problem solving Access to the right information at the right time in the right format A formal process that a group of people can use to build and implement solutions. 12 Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.
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  • Eight Keys to Effective Meetings 1.Organization (team roles, meeting process, agenda) 2.Data (right information at right time in right format) 3.Separate (a) Review of On-going Problem Solving (b) Administrative Logistics and (c) New Problem Solving 4.Problems are defined with precision 5.Solutions are comprehensive and built to fit 6.Action Plans are added for all solutions 7.Fidelity and impact of interventions are reviewed regularly 8.Solutions are adapted in response to data.
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  • Implement Solution(s) with High Integrity Implement Solution(s) with High Integrity Establish Solution Goal(s) Establish Solution Goal(s) Identify Problem with Precision Identify Problem with Precision Monitor Impact of Solution(s) and Compare with Goal Monitor Impact of Solution(s) and Compare with Goal Evaluate Problem and Redirect Evaluate Problem and Redirect Meeting Foundations Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS II) Model Discuss and Select Solution(s) with Contextual Fit Discuss and Select Solution(s) with Contextual Fit Collect and Use Data
  • Slide 15
  • TIPS Model TIPS Training One full day team training Two coached meetings Team Meeting Use of electronic meeting minute system Formal roles (facilitator, recorder, data analyst) Specific expectations (before meeting, during meeting, after meeting) Access and use of data Projected meeting minutes Research tool to measure effectiveness of TIPS Training DORA (decision, observation, recording and analysis) Measures Meeting Foundations & Thoroughness of Problem Solving Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished manual. 9
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  • TIPS I Study: Todd et al., 2011 School A School B School C School D Baseline Coaching TIPS % DORA Foundations Score Solid = SW PBIS meetings using SWIS Open = progress monitoring meeting using DIBELS Journal of Applied School Psychology
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  • TIPS I Study: Todd et al., 2011 School A School D School C Baseline Coaching TIPS % DORA Thoroughness Score Journal of Applied School Psychology Solid = SW PBIS meetings using SWIS Open = progress monitoring meeting using DIBELS
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  • DORA Foundations Score Newton et al., 2012: Effects of TIPS Training on Team Meeting Foundations Pre TIPS Training Post-TIPS Training
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  • DORA Thoroughness of Decision Making Score (Simple) Newton et al., 2012: Effects of TIPS Training on Team Decision-making Pre TIPS Training Post-TIPS Training
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  • Problem-Solving Meeting Foundations Structure of meetings lays foundation for efficiency & effectiveness
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  • Meeting Foundations Elements Four features of effective meetings 1.Predictability 2.Participation 3.Accountability 4.Communication Define roles & responsibilities Facilitator, Minute Taker, Data Analyst Use electronic meeting minutes format 21 Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.
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  • Predictability Defined roles, responsibilities and expectations for the meeting Start & end on time, if meeting needs to be extended, get agreement from all members Agenda is used to guide meeting topics Data are reviewed in first 5 minutes of the meeting Next meeting is scheduled Participation 75% of team members present & engaged in topic(s) Decision makers are present when needed What makes a successful meeting?
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  • Accountability Facilitator, Minute Taker & Data Analyst come prepared for meeting & complete during their responsibilities during the meeting System is used for monitoring progress of implemented solutions (review previous meeting minutes, goal setting) System is used for documenting decisions Efforts are making a difference in the lives of children/students. Communication All regular team members (absent or present) get access to the meeting minutes within 24 hours of the meeting Team member support to practice team meeting norms/agreements
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  • Define Roles for Effective Meetings Core roles Facilitator Minute taker Data analyst Active team member Administrator Backup for each role Typically NOT the administrator 24 Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.
  • Slide 25
  • Who is Responsible? ActionPerson Responsible Reserve Room Recruit items for Agenda Review data prior to the meeting Reserve projector and computer for meeting Keep discussion focused Record Topics and Decisions on agenda/minutes Ensure that problems are defined with precision Ensure that solutions have action plans Provide drill down data during discussion End on time Prepare minutes and send to all members Facilitator Data Analyst Minute Taker Facilitator Minute Taker Facilitator Data Analyst Facilitator Minute Taker
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  • What needs to be documented? Meeting demographics Date, time, who is present, who is absent Agenda Next meeting date/time/location/roles Administrative/General information/Planning items Topic of discussion, decisions made, who will do what, by when Problem-Solving items Problem statement, data used for problem solving, determined solutions, who will do what by when, goal, how/how often will progress toward goal be measured, how/how often will fidelity of implementation be measured 26 Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.
  • Slide 27
  • TIPS Meeting Minutes and Problem-Solving Action Plan Form Todays Meeting: Date, time, location: Facilitator: Minute Taker:Data Analyst: Next Meeting: Date, time, location: Facilitator: Minute Taker:Data Analyst: Team Members (bold are present today________________________________________________________________ Information for Team, or Issue for Team to Address Discussion/Decision/Task (if applicable)Who?By When? Administrative/General Information and Issues Implementation and Evaluation Precise Problem Statement, based on review of data (What, When, Where, Who, Why) Solution Actions (e.g., Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Reward, Correction, Extinction, Safety) Who?By When? Goal, Timeline, Decision Rule, & Updates Problem-Solving Action Plan Agenda for NEXT Meeting 1. 2. 3. Implementation and Evaluation Precise Problem Statement, based on review of data (What, When, Where, Who, Why) Solution Actions (Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Reward, Correction, Extinction, Adaptations, Safety) Who?By When?Goal with Timeline Fidelity of Imp measure Effective ness of Solution/ Plan Not started Partially Imp Imp Fidelity Done Goal Met Better Same Worse Agenda for Today: 1. 3. 5. 2. 4. 6. Previously Defined Problems/Solutions (Update)
  • Slide 28
  • TIPS Meeting Minutes and Problem-Solving Action Plan Form Todays Meeting: Date, time, location: Facilitator: Minute Taker:Data Analyst: Next Meeting: Date, time, location: Facilitator: Minute Taker:Data Analyst: Team Members (bold are present today________________________________________________________________ Information for Team, or Issue for Team to Address Discussion/Decision/Task (if applicable)Who?By When? Administrative/General Information and Issues Implementation and Evaluation Precise Problem Statement, based on review of data (What, When, Where, Who, Why) Solution Actions (e.g., Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Reward, Correction, Extinction, Safety) Who?By When? Goal, Timeline, Decision Rule, & Updates Problem-Solving Action Plan Agenda for NEXT Meeting 1. 2. 3. Implementation and Evaluation Precise Problem Statement, based on review of data (What, When, Where, Who, Why) Solution Actions (Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Reward, Correction, Extinction, Adaptations, Safety) Who? By When?Goal with Timeline Fidelity of Imp measure Effective ness of Solution/ Plan Not started Partially Imp Imp Fidelity Done Goal Met Better Same Worse Agenda for Today: 1. 3. 5. 2. 4. 6. Previously Defined Problems/Solutions (Update) Where in the Form would you place: 1.Planning for next PTA meeting? 2.There have been five fights on the playground in the past 3 weeks. 3.Update on CICO implementation 4.Increasing gang recruitment as an agenda topic for today. 5.Next meeting report on lunch- room status.
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  • Implement Solution(s) with High Integrity Implement Solution(s) with High Integrity Establish Solution Goal(s) Establish Solution Goal(s) Identify Problem with Precision Identify Problem with Precision Monitor Impact of Solution(s) and Compare with Goal Monitor Impact of Solution(s) and Compare with Goal Evaluate Problem and Redirect Evaluate Problem and Redirect Meeting Foundations Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS II) Model Discuss and Select Solution(s) with Contextual Fit Discuss and Select Solution(s) with Contextual Fit Collect and Use Data
  • Slide 32
  • More Precision Is Required to Solve the Identified Problem 1.Have current & accurate data with ability to generate custom reports before & during meetings Start with data that are summarized as primary statements 2.Use data to define precision problem statement(s) A problem exists, when there is a discrepancy between current level and desired level Define a primary problem statement Use basic and custom reports to define problem with precision What, Where, When, Who, Why Discrimination/ motor/ self-management errors 3.Define goal(s) What will those data look like when there is not a problem? SMART goals: S pecific, M easurable, A chievable, R elevant, T imely
  • Slide 33
  • Start with Primary Problem Statements Look at the Big Picture, then use data to refine the Big Picture, moving to development of Precise Problem Statement(s) Move to Precise Problem Statements More Precision Is Required to Solve Identified Problems
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  • Problem Solving (Core) Features Defining Goals Problems that have solutions defined have a goal defined. SMART Goals S pecific M easurable A chievable R elevant T imely Primary Problem Statement Our average Major ODRs per school day per month are higher than the national median for a school of our enrollment size. We have peaks in frequency of problems in Nov, Feb & April, with an increasing trend from August to May. Primary Goal The rate of problem behavior will be at or below the national average for a school of our enrollment size. (~.31 per day per month) for the next school y...

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