Soil Genesis and Classification (Buol/Soil Genesis and Classification) || Andisols: Soils with Andic Soil Properties

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    Soil Genesis and Classification, Sixth Edition. S. W. Buol, R. J. Southard, R. C. Graham and P. A. McDaniel. 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Published 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

    Andisols: Soils with Andic Soil Properties

    Andisols are soils with properties dominated by short-range-order compounds such as aluminosilicates, ferrihydrite, and organometallic complexes. The vast majority of Andisols formed from volcanic tephra (ash, pumice, cinders) and related volcanic parent materials, although a few have formed from nonvolcanic materials. Formally adopted as the 11th soil order in 1990 (Soil Survey Staff, 1990), Andisols represent many soils known by other names, including Ando soils, Kurobokudo, Andosols, and Volcanic Ash Soils. Although the definition does not precisely match the definitions of these other groups of soils, Andisols are closely related to Andosols, one of the 32 reference soil groups in the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (IUSS Working Group WRB 2006). In the first edition of Soil Taxonomy, Andisols were mostly identified as Andepts and Andaquepts (Inceptisols), a placement that recognized the properties resulting from minimal crystallization and redistribution of weathering products.

    SettingThe primary control of Andisol characteristics is volcanic parent material, especially ash. Volcanic ash refers to the

  • 250 Soil Genesis and Classification

    (McDaniel et al. 2010). Small areas of The Rift Valley of Africa, as well as Italy, France, Spain, and Romania also have important areas of Andisols.

    All soil moisture regimes and all soil temperature regimes are found in Andisols. However, limited water for hydrolytic reactions in extremely arid regions prevents the weathering of volcanic ash, and hence the formation of Andisols. Vegetation is also very diverse, ranging from desert shrubs in arid regions, to dense coniferous forests in humid regions, to tundra in cold regions of higher latitudes and elevations. The asso-ciation of Andisols with volcanic activity also dictates that they are frequently on steep mountain slopes at higher elevations. However, forming from airborne material, they can be found on any terrain, including floodplains where the volcanic material is water deposited.

    Pedogenic ProcessesMany of our usual concepts of soil formation have to be modified somewhat when considering the genesis of Andisols. The most noticeable difference is that the youngest and sometimes least-weathered part of the soil is the surface layer or horizon. Many Andisols are formed in unconsolidated volcanic ejecta originating from sequential eruptions of one or more volcanoes. The result is a distinctly layered soil profile with buried soil horizons (Figure 9.1). In quiet periods between eruptions, weathering and other soil-forming processes proceed in a top-down manner, giving rise to a sequence of soil horizons. A subsequent eruption can then cover the land surface with fresh tephra. In cases where tephra accumulates rapidly, existing soil horizons may be deeply buried and effectively isolated from further pedogenesis as soil formation resumes at the new land surface. This scenario is known as retardant upbuilding (Schaetzl and Anderson 2005) and gives rise to soils such as the one shown in Figure 9.1. Alternatively, if subsequent eruptions produce relatively thin additions of new tephra and accumulation rates are low, developmental upbuilding continues (Schaetzl and Anderson 2005). As new tephra is added to the soil profile, it is exposed to pedogenesis before burial. This results in the intermixed tephra deposits having a soil fabric inherited from when the tephra was part of the A or B horizon (McDaniel et al. 2010). In short, understanding Andisol genesis in many instances requires a stratigraphic approach in combination with an appreciation of buried soil horizons and polygenesis.

    The nature of ash falls varies greatly both in time and space. Volcanic events can be of short duration or persist as a continuous eruption over several years. The size of particles deposited at a site may one day be coarse and the next fine, depend-ing upon the direction and speed of the wind. Some eruptions completely bury both soil andvegetation, whereas many and perhaps most ash falls only partially bury the vegetation, which continues to grow as the ash accumulates. Materials of contrasting composition are common from the same volcano, even during a single eruption.

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  • 9 / Andisols: Soils with Andic Soil Properties 251

    Volcanic ash is mineralogically different from most other parent materials. Rapid cooling of the molten materials upon ejection prevents crystallization of min-erals with long-range atomic order, and the resulting product is known as volcanic glass or vitric material (Figure 9.2). Although the bulk chemical composition may be similar to that of other rocks with well-defined mineral constituents (e.g., rhyolitic, andesitic, basaltic), discrete minerals do not exist. As a result, volcanic glass is more weatherable than crystalline materials with the same bulk composition. Volcanic eruptions that produce significant amounts of ash are usually explosive due to the high silica content of the magma and a large component of gases (water, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide). The explosive eruptions consist not only of glass formed by the cooling of magma, but also of fragments of rocks, often hydrothermally altered, from the throat of the volcano. Many of these lithic fragments may be coated by glass. The resulting ash fall, often called tephra deposits or pyroclastic material (approximate synonyms), therefore may be a mixture of crystalline minerals and volcanic glass.

    The glassy materials that dominate the coarser fractions of many Andisols weather relatively rapidly to form colloidal materials that possess short-range order. Once

    Figure 9.1. Typic Udivitrand from central North Island of New Zealand. Exposure shows sequence of buried soil horizons formed in multiple tephra deposits. Stratigraphy, tephra unit ages (left side of figure), and horizon designations are from Lowe (2008). Scale divisions = 10 cm.

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  • 252 Soil Genesis and Classification

    thought to be amorphous, these materials comprise very small but structured nanominerals (Hochella 2008). The predominant weathering products include allophane, imogolite, ferrihydrite, and metal-humus complexes. These minerals differ markedly from those of most other mineral soils and confer the unique properties associated with Andisols. Even a fundamental soil property such as texture takes on a new meaning, as many of the weathering products, especially in moister environments, tend to exist as gels rather than discrete clay-size particles. This, coupled with high variable charge, makes complete dispersion of these materials difficult. Not surprising is the fact that laboratory particle-size analyses generally indicate less clay-size material than do field estimates (Ping et al. 1989).

    The suite of weathering products found in Andisols depends to a large extent on the leaching regime, the acidity of the weathering environment, the supply of organic acids, and the presence of 2:1 layer silicates. Shoji et al. (1993) and Dahlgren et al. (2004) provide extensive discussions of the weathering environments and processes. Brief descriptions of two of the most common weathering scenarios are presented here.

    As glass and other minerals weather via dissolution and hydrolysis by carbonic acid, aluminum and silicon are released. Under conditions where soil pH >5 or when organic matter production is relatively low, aluminum and silicon polymerize and precipitate to form the short-range-order aluminosilicates allophane and imogolite in surface horizons. Iron may also precipitate as ferrihydrite, a short-range-order oxyhydroxide (Bigham et al. 2002). These weathering products are characteristic of allophanic Andisols (Figure 9.3).

    10mm

    Figure 9.2. Scanning electron micrograph of a glass shard from the eruption of Mount Mazama (nowCrater Lake, OR) approximately 7,700 years ago. The vesicles seen in the glass indicate a highly explosive eruption of viscous magma. Today, this glass blankets most of the forested regions of the Pacific Northwest. (Image courtesy of University of Idaho.)

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  • 9 / Andisols: Soils with Andic Soil Properties 253

    Although once considered amorphous, allophane consists of hollow spheres with diameters of 3.55 nm (Parfitt 2009) (Figure 9.4A). Imogolite has a somewhat simi-lar chemical composition but appears as long thread-like tubes with inner and outer diameters of 1 and 2 nm, respectively (Churchman 2000) (Figure 9.4B). In some cases, poorly crystalline smectites appear to be the initial weathering products, which subsequently are desilicated to form allophane and imogolite (Southard and Southard 1989). Over time, dehydration and structural rearrangement of allophane and imogolite may lead to halloysite formation, especially if desilication is not too severe. Halloysite formation is favored under conditions of lower rainfall, Si-rich parent materials, and restricted drainage (Lowe 1986; Churchman 2000). Progressive desil-ication may ultimately produce gibbsite in some Andisols, although the horizons that contain gibbsite may not have andic properties. Seasonal dryness, as in ustic and xeric soil moisture regimes, seems to speed the formation of the crystalline clays, while perudic soil moisture regimes favor the persistence of the short-range-order compounds.

    A second mineral weathering scenario occurs under more acidic conditions when soil pH is

  • 254 Soil Genesis and Classification

    the aluminum-humus complexes accumulate in surface horizons. Note the similarity of this process to that discussed in Chapter 17 regarding Spodosols. These Andisols are referred to as nonallophanic because they are dominated by organic rather than inorganic short-range-order compounds (Figure 9.5). If 2:1 layer silicate minerals arepresent in the parent material, the aluminum may also precipitate as hydroxy- interlayer islands. Under these conditions, desilication is a dominant process in the surface and upper subsurface horizons. Opaline silica accumulations are common, especially in semiarid climates.

    Andisols generally have higher organic matter contents than do other mineral soils in similar environments. Many researchers have demonstrated positive correla-tions between organic matter and allophane, imogolite, and ferrihydrite. Interactions between these components appear to result in organic matter stabilization (Dahlgren etal. 2004). Organic matter may sorb to these short-range-order minerals, thereby decreasing mineralization rates. Iron and aluminum are also able to bind with humic substances, creating complexes that are very resistant to degradation and leaching (Hiradate 2004). Active aluminum associated with Al-humus complexes can be toxicto many microorganisms, thereby inhibiting decomposition and increasing the residence time of the organic fraction.

    10 nm

    10 nm

    (A)

    (B)

    Figure 9.4. Micrographs of (A) allophane spherules and (B) imogolite threads from an Icelandic Andisol (Haplocryand). (Courtesy Geoderma and modified from Wada et al. 1992, Clay minerals of four soils formed in eolian and tephra materials in Iceland, Geoderma 52, p. 359, with permission from Elsevier)

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  • 9 / Andisols: Soils with Andic Soil Properties 255

    Andisols may be pedogenically linked with soils of other orders. Soils formed in fresh, unweathered volcanic ejecta have not undergone sufficient weathering to develop andic properties and are classified as Entisols. Dahlgren et al. (1997) estimated that approximately 200300 years of weathering are required for silicic tephra to attain andic soil properties under cryic-udic conditions. Other pedogenic linkages may also occur. In cool, moist environments, Fe and Al derived from weathering of volcanic ash can form organometallic complexes that may then be translocated to form spodic horizons. Spodosols in tephra deposits have been reported in Japan (Shoji et al. 1988), New Zealand (Parfitt and Saigusa 1985), the Pacific Northwest region of the United States (Dahlgren and Ugolini 1991; McDaniel et al. 1993), and Alaska (Ping et al. 1989). Under warm, moist conditions and with-out significant additions of fresh volcanic ejecta, Andisols may eventually develop intosoils of other orders as meta-stable weathering products are transformed into crystalline minerals. As an example, both Ultisols and Oxisols have formed from Andisols under humid, tropical conditions in Costa Rica (Martini 1976; Nieuwenhuyse etal. 2000) and Hawaii (Chadwick et al. 1999). Transformation of Andisols to Inceptisols and Alfisols has also been reported in the literature (Dahlgren et al. 2004).

    Selected properties of representative Andisols are presented in Table 9.1. The Typic Vitrixerand has formed in 7,700-year-old tephra under xeric/frigid regimes, and represents a relatively early stage of Andisol development. In contrast, the Acrudoxic

    Figure 9.5. Melanudand from Costa Rica. Soil has a melanic epipedon and is an example of a nonallophanic Andisol in which organo-metal compounds dominate the colloidal fraction. Scale divisions are decimeters. For color detail, please see color plate section.

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  • 256

    Tabl

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    2.54

    2.31

    6618

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    1.7

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    Buol_c09.indd 256Buol_c09.indd 256 7/1/2011 12:41:52 PM7/1/2011 12:41:52 PM

  • 9 / Andisols: Soils with Andic Soil Properties 257

    Hydrudand has weathered extensively under udic/isomesic regimes as evidenced by the higher measured clay contents and 1,500 kPa water retention.

    It is important to recognize that not all Andisols form from volcanic parent materials. The nonvolcanic Andisols generally occur under cool, humid climates, wherein rapid mineral weathering produces abundant aluminum, which forms complexes with large amounts of organic matter in surface horizons. The Lytell series in coastal mountains of Washington state is an example of an Andisol that has formed in siltstone or fine-grained sandstone dominated by quartz, feldspar, mica, and phyllosilicate clays rather than volcanic materials (Hunter et al. 1987). High rainfall (2,500 mm of annual precipitation), an isomesic soil temperature regime, and abundant organic acids result in the formation of Al- and Fe-humus complexes and hydrous Fe oxides of varying crystallinity (Hunter et al. 1987); this mineralogical suite is responsible for the observed andic soil properties and classification as a Typic Fulvudand (Soil Survey Division 2010).

    Uses of AndisolsThe uses of Andisols are limited by extremely cold conditions on high volcanic peaks and at high latitudes and by dryness in arid regions. Most Andisols are on steep slopes, thus limiting the use of much mechanization in farming operations. Many Andisols in cool, mountainous terrain support commercial timber harvest operations. Andisols of the inland mountainous areas of Washington, Idaho, and Oregon support the most productive forests found within the region (Kimsey et al. 2008). Much of this productivity is attributable to increased water-holding capacity associated with tephra mantles in these seasonally dry landscapes (McDaniel et al. 2005).

    Where climatic conditions are favorable, Andisols support dense human populations. Despite having the least areal extent of the 12 soil orders, Andisols are estimated to support as much as 10% of the earths population (Ping 2000). Most notable among these areas are parts of the Rift valley in east Africa, the Andean chain in South America, Central America, Japan, and the island of Java in Indonesia. Andisols generally have low bulk density and are easy to till. Being composed of relatively unweathered materials, they can be very fertile, with the fertility being related to the chemistry of the volcanic ejecta. Coolness, related to altitude, favors a low rate of disease and in the free-draining Andisols, there is little stagnant water to promote insect reproduction. Alluvial valleys in Andisol areas are often very fertile, although the soils may be mixed with other material and not classified as Andisols.

    There can also be significant limitations to plant growth in Andisols. Siliceous tephras in combination with high rainfall and leaching, as on the North Island of New Zealand, give rise to low-fertility Andisols (Lowe and Palmer 2005). Most Andisols are acid, and in cases of very high acidity, high levels of exchangeable Al can inhibit plant growth. This problem is most common in nonallophanic Andisols (Dahlgren et al. 2004) but can be mitigated with additions of lime (Takahashi etal.

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  • 258 Soil Genesis and Classification

    2006). Allophanic Andisols are converted to nonallophanic Andisols in as little as 30years with the establishment of bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) vegetation on clear-cut sites in northern Idaho (Johnson-Maynard et al. 1997). This shift is brought about by a substantial increase in belowground organic carbon and an accompanying increase in active aluminum associated with Al-humus complexes; the increase in active aluminum appears to be associated with poor timber regeneration.

    A major limitation to improvement of Andisols for agricultural use is their tendency to strongly sorb or fix phosphate in a plant-unavailable form (Fox 1980). Phosphate retention results in very low soil-solution concentrations of phosphate (Figure 9.6). The phosphate appears to bind to Al-OH and Fe-OH groups via ligand exchange (Harsh et al. 2002; Schwertmann and Taylor 1989).

    Because it is such an important characteristic of Andisols, high-phosphate retention is used as a criterion for defining andic soil properties in Soil Taxonomy (Soil Survey Staff 2010a). The highest P fixation is found in those soils that are fine grained and have relatively high Al:Si ratios. Soil material with the greatest potential to fix P can be identified by pH value >10.6 in 1N NaF (Alvarado and Buol 1985). Because large quantities of aluminum are present in both the organometallic and aluminosilicate short-range-order compounds in many Andisols, it is often not practical to overcome the fixation capacity by fertilizer application. Unique methods of P fertilization, such as adding large pellets of superphosphate to the soil or soaking potato tubers in phosphate solution have been known to work in such soils.

    800

    Andicmaterials

    Non-andicmaterials

    700

    600

    500

    P so

    rbed

    (ppm

    )

    400

    300

    200

    100

    00.01 0.1 1 10 100

    Soil-solution P (ppm)

    Figure 9.6. Relationship between sorbed P and soil-solution P in andic and non-andic materials in a soil profile from northern Idaho. Data points for each curve represent additions of 5, 25, 50, and 75 ppm of P. Andic materials fix virtually all of the added P and are able to maintain only low concentrations of P in soil solution. (Data from Jones et al. 1979)

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  • 9 / Andisols: Soils with Andic Soil Properties 259

    Most Andisols are stable and resist water erosion because of rapid infiltration and relatively high permeability. However, physical disturbance of Andisols may significantly reduce permeability and increase susceptibility to water erosion. Timber-harvesting traffic on skid trails in western Montana reduced infiltration by as much as 81% in volcanic ash-mantled soils (Cullen et al. 1991). When dry, Andisols are susceptible to wind erosion (Warkentin and Maeda 1980) and are often very dusty when trafficked for agriculture, forestry, or recreation. Work by Arnalds et al. (2001) has shown that andic materials are susceptible to wind erosion at relatively low wind velocities that are frequently exceeded in Iceland, contributing to extensive degradation of the countrys highlands.

    Low bulk density, poor compactability, and large changes in cohesion and fric-tion angle on drying of Andisols require careful consideration for engineering pro-jects (Warkentin 1985). Engineering uses of some Andisols may also be limited by a property known as thixotropy. Thixotropy refers to a reversible gel-sol transformation in which applied pressure causes the soil to suddenly liquify and flow (Nanzyo et al. 1993; Neall 2006). Upon release of pressure, the soil reverts to a solid state. This property is more pronounced in hydrous families of Andisols that contain large quantities of poorly crystalline weathering products, such as the Hydrudand for which data are presented in Table 9.1. The 1,500 kPa water retention for the B horizons ranges from 149 to more than 250% on undried samples. Such Andisols should be dried prior to use for many engineering purposes, because this will result in irreversible collapse of allophane spherules and greater strength (Neall 2006). Note that 1,500 kPa water retention values in Table 9.1 are substantially less for air-dried samples than for moist samples.

    Classification of AndisolsThe basic concept of Andisols centers on soils formed from volcanic materials that have weathered enough to produce short-range-order aluminosilicate and organome-tallic compounds by in situ transformation but that have not weathered to the point where crystalline materials predominate or where significant illuviation has occurred. Acid-oxalate-extractable aluminum and iron are used to estimate the quantities of short-range-order compounds that have formed from the weathering of volcanic glass, and this serves as a quantitative basis for defining andic soil properties in Soil Taxonomy (See Chapter 2.) Andic soil properties can be qualitatively identified using an NaF field test (Fieldes and Perrott 1966). Soil-NaF pH values in excess of 9.49.5 indicate the presence of allophane and/or metal-humus complexes (Soil Survey Staff 1996; IUSS Working Group WRB 2006).

    In the key to soil orders in Soil Taxonomy, Andisols follow Histosols, which specifically exclude soils with andic properties, and Spodosols, which exclude soils with andic properties unless they have an albic horizon. Andisols have andic soil properties in 60% or more of the thickness of soil material within 60 cm of the min-eral soil surface, or of the top of an organic layer with andic properties. The andic soil

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  • 260 Soil Genesis and Classification

    property definition includes essentially all volcanic materials ranging from slightly altered cinders or pumice deposits to extremely fine amorphous gels of allophane and/or imogolite (Parfitt 1985; Uehara 1985).

    Suborders of Andisols are defined by soil moisture and temperature regimes, and by water retention characteristics as shown in Figure 9.7 and Table 9.2.

    Aquands have a histic epipedon, or have aquic conditions in a layer at a depth of 4050 cm below the mineral soil surface or from the top of an organic layer with andic properties, and have redoximorphic features in that layer. Aquands occur locally under a wide array of climatic conditions in depressions and along floodplains where water tables are at or near the soil surface for at least part of the year.

    Gelands are very cold Andisols that have a gelic soil temperature regime (mean annual soil temperature

  • 9 / Andisols: Soils with Andic Soil Properties 261

    Table 9.2. Suborders and Great Groups in the Andisols order

    Suborder Great Group

    Aquands Gelaquands have a gelic soil temperature regime. Cryaquands have a cryic soil temperature regime.

    Placaquands have, in 50% or more of the pedon, a placic horizon within 100 cm of the mineral soil surface or the top of an organic layer with andic properties.

    Duraquands have, in 75% or more of each pedon, a cemented layer that does not slake after air-drying within 100 cm of the mineral soil surface or the top of an organic layer with andic properties.

    Vitraquands have 100 kPa water retention

  • 262 Soil Genesis and Classification

    Torrands have aridic soil moisture regimes. These soils are of limited extent globally and occur in parts of the western United States, and in the Cape Verde, Canary, and Hawaiian islands. Most are vegetated by desert shrubs. Torrands are the least extensive of the Andisol suborders, accounting for only 1,500 km2 of the earths ice-free land area (USDA-NRCS database).

    Xerands have xeric soil moisture regimes. These soils occur mostly in the western United States under coniferous forest in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and California. They also are found in southern Europe, the Canary Islands, Argentina (Broquen et al. 2005), and South Australia (Lowe and Palmer 2005).

    Vitrands are defined in terms of water retention characteristics rather than by moisture or temperature regime. These Andisols have 1,500-kPa water retention of less than 15% on air-dried samples and of less than 30% on undried samples, throughout at least 60% of the thickness of soil within 60 cm of the mineral soil surface or of the top of an organic layer with andic soil properties (Figure 9.5). Put in a more general way, these are glassy and ashy Andisols that have relatively low water- holding capacity. By their placement in the key of Andisol suborders, Vitrands are restricted to ustic and udic soil moisture regimes, and support a wide variety of vegetation. By recent USDA-NRCS estimates, they are the most extensive of the Andisol suborders (USDA-NRCS database). Vitrands are extensive on the North Island of New Zealand. In the United States, they occur mostly in Holocene deposits in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. Forest canopy and litter accumulation have helped protect the mantle of volcanic ash mantle from erosion, thereby maintaining a sufficient thickness of andic materials to meet requirements of Andisols (McDaniel et al. 2005; Soil Survey Staff 2010a). Data for an example of a Vitrand from this region are presented in Table 9.1.

    Ustands have ustic soil moisture regimes. Most Ustands are in intertropical regions and present on the lee side of many of the volcanic islands in the Pacific, in Central America, South America, and Africa. These soils are cultivated to a wide array of crops, most notably coffee.

    Udands have udic soil moisture regimes. These soils are almost as extensive as the Vitrands and are certainly the most studied, particularly in Japan and New Zealand. This suborder represents the classic dark-colored volcanic soils with low bulk density, high phosphate-fixing capacity, and abundant aluminum and iron in short-range-order

    Table 9.2. Concluded.

    Suborder Great Group

    Hydrudands have 1,500-kPa water retention of

  • 9 / Andisols: Soils with Andic Soil Properties 263

    organic and inorganic compounds. In the United States, Udands occur in Hawaii (asshown in Table 9.1), and on the west side of the Cascade Range in Washington andOregon.

    Great groups are identified on the basis of a number of properties, including placic horizons, cemented layers, water retention characteristics, and characteristics of the epipedon. (See Table 9.2.) Especially noteworthy is the melanic epipedon, which is identified in great groups of the Aquands, Cryands, Xerands, and Udands. This epipedon is dominated by black Type-A humic acids that commonly are derived from graminoid roots (Figure 9.5). The melanic epipedon has a thickness of

  • 264 Soil Genesis and Classification

    properties, by the processes of in situ mineral and organic transformations and lack of extensive illuviation of these compounds. These soils are used extensively for agricultural production in warmer, more humid climates. Andisols are generally characterized by a combination of low bulk density, high phosphate sorption capacity, relatively high amounts of aluminum and iron that can be extracted from short-range-order or nanominerals, and volcanic glasscollectively referred to as andic soil properties. Suborders, great groups, and families are identified largely based on soil moisture and temperature regimes, water retention characteristics, and characteristics of the epipedon. The establishment of the Andisol order in 1990 reflects the continued growth of soil science and demonstrates the ability of Soil Taxonomy to change as we learn more about soils.

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