SCHOOL OF INFORMATION - University of Texas at OF INFORMATION . ... Digital Age: Education College and University Students Online. ALA, ... Exam I, with field visit 1 ...

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  • SCHOOL OF INFORMATION UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

    Spring 2006 INF 382D

    Bill Lukenbill Spring 2009

    Unique no. 27395 Office SZB 562H Phone471-3876

    Email luke@ischool.utexas.edu Office Hours:

    Tu 4-5 Th 4-5

    Syllabus

    INF 382D. Introduction to Information Resources and Services

    Course Description: Evaluation and use of printed and online information resources and services found and used in the popular library (e.g., schools and public libraries, with emphasis on new information technologies. Information-seeking behavior of users, document delivery, new roles of the information specialist in users support, communication and helping skills, and information needs of a variety of clients using libraries. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. (Graduate standing)

    Purposes and Objectives of the Course

    The Objectives of this course are: 1. to acquaint you with and increase your knowledge of a sample of reference tools which are considered basic for the answering of typical reference questions in libraries and information centers; 2. to introduce techniques and procedures for the critical evaluation of reference materials; 3. to introduce you to standard techniques for the solving of typical information questions; 4. to acquaint you with the basic helping relation concepts and communication skills suitable of use in reference and information retrieval work; 5. to introduce you to fundamental concepts in information and reference services, including electronic information delivery. 6. to introduce you to basic procedures for planning, managing, and evaluation of reference services Texts (Some required): Cassell, Kay Ann and Hiremath, Uma. Reference and Information Services in the 21st Century. Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2006. Required. Kovacs, Diane K. The Virtual Reference Handbook. Interview and Information Delivery Techniques for the Chat and E-Mail Environments. Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2007. Optional.

    mailto:luke@ischool.utexas.edu

  • Other support materials: Janes, Joseph. Introduction to Reference Work in the Digital Age. New York: Neal- Schuman, 2003. Lukenbill, W. Bernard. Community Resources in the School Library Media Center. Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited, 2004. Z 675 S3 L8954 2004. PCL Reserves. University of Texas. INF 382D Manual. (purchase at copy shop). Helpful General Guides to Reference Sources and Services: American Association of School Librarians. A Planning Guide for Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning with School Library Media Program Assessment Rubric for the 21st Century. Chicago: American Library Association, 1999. Z 675 S3 P559 1999. PCL Reserves. American Association of School Librarians and Association for Educational Communication and Technology. Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning. New ed. Chicago: American Library Association, 1998. Z 675 S3 A436 1988 PCL Stacks / PCL Reserves. American Reference Books Annual. Littleton, Colo.; Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited, 1970 to date. Z 1035.1 A55. PCL Ref. Balay, Robert, ed. Guide to Reference Books. 11th. ed. American Library Association, 1996. Supplements as announced. Z1035.1 G89 1996. PCL Ref. Booklist. Reference Books Bulletin: 2004-2005. Annual list of the best reviews from Booklist. Braun, Linda. Teen Library: Developing Internet Services for Young Adults. Chicago: American Library Association, 2002. Broderick, James F. and Miller, Darren W. A Critical Guide to 100 Prominent News and Information Sites on the Web. CyberAge Books, 2007. Campbell, Nicole, ed. Usability Assessment of Library-Related Web Sites. LITA Guide #7. Library and Information Technology Association, 2001. Chelton, Mary K. and Young Adult Services Association. Excellence in Library Services to Young Adults: The Nation's Top Programs. 3rd ed. Chicago: American Library Association, 2000. Daugherty, Alice and Russo, Michael F. Information Literacy Programs in the Digital Age: Education College and University Students Online. ALA, 2007. Davidsen, Susanna and Yankee, Everyl. Web Site Design with the Patron in Mind: A-Step-by-Step Guide for Libraries. ALA, 2004. Durrance, Joan C. and Pettigrew. Online Community Information: Creating a Nexus at Your Library. ALA, 2002. Gale Directory of Databases. Gale Research, 1993 to date. QA 76.9 D32 D575. PCL Ref.

  • Gordon, Rachel Singer. Information Tomorrow: Reflections on Technology and the Future of Public and Academic Libraries. Information Today, 2007. ____. Teaching the Internet in Libraries. Chicago: ALA, 2001. Hock, Randolph. The Extreme Searchers Internet Handbook: A Guide for the Serious Searcher. 2nd. ed. CyberAge Books, 2007. Hughes-Hassell, Sandra and Wheelock, Ann., eds. The Information-Powered School: Public Education Network and American Association of School Librarians. Chicago: American Library Association, 2001. Z 675 S3 I4265 2001. PCL Reserves. Kennedy, Mary Lee and Dysart, Jane, eds. Intranets for Info Pros. Information Today, 2007. Lankes, David and others, eds. Virtual Reference Service: From Competencies to Assessment. Neal-Schuman, 2007. Libutti, Patricia OBrien. Digital Resources and Librarians: Case Studies in Innovation, Invention, and Implementation. ALA, 2004. McDermott, Irene E. The Librarians Internet Survival Guide: Strategies for the High- Tech Reference Desk. Edited by Barbara Quint. Information Today, 2005. Nahl, Diane and Bilal, Dania, eds. Information and Emotion: The Emergent Affective Paradigm in Information Behavior Research and Theory. Information Today, 2007. Norlin, Elaina and Winters, C. M. Usability Testing for Library Web Sites: A Hands-On Guide. ALA, 2002. Ragains, Patrick, ed. Information Literary Instruction that Works: A Guide to Teaching by Discipline and Student Population. Neal-Schuman, 2006. ZA 3075 I537 2006. PCL. CD-ROM available in Electronic Information Center PCL 2.200 under same classification no. Ratzan, Lee. Understanding Information Systems: What They Do and Why We Need Them. Chicago: American Library Association, 2004. Sweetland, James H. Fundamental Reference Sources, 3rd ed. Chicago: American Library Association, 2001. Z 1035.1 C5 2001. PCL. Webb, Jo and others. Providing Effective Library Services for Research. Neal- Schuman, 2007. Z 675 R45 W 42 2007. PCL. Whitlatch, Jo Bell. Evaluating Reference Services: A Practical Guide. ALA, 2000. Wilson, A. Paula. Library Web Sites: Creating Online Collections and Services. Chicago: American Library Association, 2004. Ziarnik, Natalie Reif. School and Public Libraries: Developing the Natural Alliance. Chicago: American Library Association, 2003.

  • Periodicals Worth Knowing The Booklist. Electronic Access: http://www.lib.utexas.edu:9003/sfx_local?&sid=sfx:opac_856&genre=journal &issn=00067385. Continues: Booklist and Subscription Books Bulletin. Current Issues Shelved by Title Periodicals Room PCL 2.500. Summary Of Older Volumes: PCL Stacks Z 1035 A49 V.66 1969/70 through V.101 No.1-12 2004/05. Earlier issues on microfilm. Knowledge Quest: Journal of The American Association Of School Librarians. Internet: Electronic access available. Continues in part School Library Media Quarterly. Current issues shelved by title periodicals room PCL 2.500. Older issues at Z 675 S3 S2912 PCL. Information Technology and Libraries. Internet Electronic access available. Current issues shelved by title periodicals room PCL 2.500. Older issues at Z 678.9 A1 I536, PCL. Public Libraries. Internet Electronic access available. Continues Public Library Association. PLA Newsletter. Current issues in Periodicals Room PCL 2.500. Older issues at Z 731 P932, PCL. Online. Internet: Electronic access available. Current issues in Periodical Room, PCL. Older issues at Z 699 A1 O5445, PCL. Reference and Use Service Quarterly. Continuation of RQ. Internet: Electronic access available. Current issues in Periodical Room, PCL. Older issues at Z 671 R23, PCL. Reference Librarian. Internet: Electronic access available. Current issues in Reference Room, PCL. Older issues at Z 11 R52, PCL. School Library Journal : SLJ.

    Electronic Access: http://www.lib.utexas.edu:9003/sfx_local?&sid=sfx:opac_856&genre=journal&issn=03628930. Continues: JuniorLibraries. Current Issues Shelved by Title Periodicals Room PCL 2.500. Summary of older volumes: PCL Stacks Z 675 S3 S29115 V.21 1974/75 through V.51 No.1-4 2005.

    School Library Media Research: SLMR. Internet: Electronic access available. Continuation of School Library Media Quarterly.

    http://www.lib.utexas.edu:9003/sfx_local?&sid=sfx:opac_856&genre=journal%09&issn%09=00067385http://www.lib.utexas.edu:9003/sfx_local?&sid=sfx:opac_856&genre=journal%09&issn%09=00067385http://www.lib.utexas.edu:9003/sfx_local?&sid=sfx:opac_856&genre=journal&issn=03628930http://www.lib.utexas.edu:9003/sfx_local?&sid=sfx:opac_856&genre=journal&issn=03628930

  • Topics What is Reference? History of Reference and Information Provisions in Libraries Current and Future Developments and Issues What We Use to Provide Services Management Skills Technical Skills People Skills Social Responsibilities and Expectations Connecting with Our Communities Introduction to Essential Techniques Helping People Find Information: Communication Theories Helping Relationships and Helping Skills Information Retrieval Skills Information Retrieval Boolean logic Truncation Controlled vocabulary How People Learn and the Relationship to Information Needs Tools and Skills for Evaluation of Information Evaluation of Resources Print and Electronic Resources Internet Information Needs of Users Situational and Contextual Influences Cognitive Needs Affective Needs Social and Cultural Needs Analyzing the Reference Question/Inquiry Contextual Considerations Institutional Context Person as Context Place as Context Inquiry in Context Source in Context Finding InformationSources and Contexts: Biographical Resources Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquiries Words and Dictionaries Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquiries Facts and Ready References Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires Bibliography and Bibliographic Control Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires

  • Encyclopedias Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires Electronic Resources Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires Places and Travel Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires Community Information Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires Management, Planning, and Evaluation of Services Information Literacy and Critical Thinking Skills

    Grade Values and Assignments: Exercise portfolio and readings 20% Exam 1 (includes field visit) 20% Exam 2 (include field visit) 20% Product Reviews 30% Review 1 Review 2 Review 3 Participation 10%

    Schedule and Assignments Please note assignments that require some prior-class preparation for in-class and/or group discussion. Make sure your check the textbook readings assignments listing preparation for the class discussion. For January 22 read: Cassell and Hiremath, Ch. 1, Ch. 17, Ch 20 January 22 Module 1A Module 1- What is Reference? Module 2- Evaluation of Information Resources For January 29 read: Cassell and Hiremath, Ch. 2, Ch. 3 January 29 Module 3- The Information Question and Inquiry Process Module 4. Information Retrieval Skills For February 5 read: Review Cassell and Hiremath, Ch. 3 February 5 Model 5 Introduction to Essential Communication and Helping Techniques Module 6. How People Learn and are Socialized in Society: Theories and Applications For February 12 read Cassell and Hiremath, Ch. 11 Prepare for class discussion on biographical sources. See exercise Module 7A

  • February 12 Module 7A. Biographical Resources Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquiries Product Review 1 is due For February 19 Read Cassell and Hiremath, Ch. 7 Prepare for class discussion on words and dictionary sources. See exercise in Module 7B in manual February 19 Module 7B. Words and Dictionaries Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquiries For February 26: Read Cassell and Hiremath, Ch 6, Ch 8 Prepare for class discussion on ready reference sources. See exercise in Module 7C in manual February 26 Module 7C. Facts and Ready Reference Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires Review 2 due For March 5-12: Read Cassell an Hiremath, Ch 4, 8, 12 Prepare for class discussion on indexes and bibliography, and bibliographic control. See exercise in Modules 7D in manual March 5-12 Module 7D. Bibliography, Indexes and Bibliographic Control, Government publications Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires March 12 Exam I, with field visit 1 (second part of class: 1 hour and 45 minutes) For March 26 Read Cassell and Hiremath, Ch. 5 Prepare for class discussion on encyclopedias. See exercise in Module 7E in manual March 19 Spring Break March 26 Module 7E. Encyclopedias Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires Review 3 due For April 2 Read Cassell and Hiremath, Ch. 13 Read also in the professional literature Electronic Resources and be able to engage in discussion on your reading. Complete the analysis exercise for Electronic Resources, found in your manual, Module 7F April 2 Module 7F. Electronic Resources Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires For April 9 Read Cassell and Hiermath, Ch. 10 Prepare for class discussion on Places and Travel. See exercise in Module 7G in manual

  • April 9 Module 7G. Places and Travel Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires Review 3 is due For April 16 Prepare for discussion on Community Information. Read in the professional literature about Community Information. See Module 7H April 16 Module 7H. Community Information Problems and Issues Examples of tools and Inquires For April 23 Read Cassell and Hiermath, Ch. 14, 16 Prepare for discussion on information literacy, instruction, and reader advisement Module 9 in manual April 23 Information Literacy and Instruction Problems and Issues Examples of programs For April 30 Read Cassell and Hiermath, Ch. 14, 16 Prepare for discussion on management and evaluation See Module 9 in manual April 30 Management and Evaluation of references services Problems and Issues Examples of programs Exam II, with field visit 2 (last part of class 1 hour and 45 minutes) Portfolio and readings and exercises due

    Assignment Due Dates: Review 1 Feb. 12 Review 2 Feb. 26 Review 3 Mar. 26 Exam I Mar. 12 Exam II Apr. 30 Portfolio/exercises Apr. 30 Class participation Ongoing

    Grade Determinants 100-95 = A 94-93 = A- 92-90 = B+ 89-84 = B 83-80 = B- 79-70 = C 69-60 = D 59-00 = F

  • ANNOTATED ASSIGNMENTS Three Product Reviews. You are also required to select and prepare three professional-level items reviews of recently published reference books or information products. Follow the general guidelines of professional reviewing as you find in professional journals and/or guidance from Cassell and Hiremath. See Periodicals Worth Knowing in this syllabus for examples of published reviews. Make sure that you have read Cassell and Hiremath, Ch. 17 and several reviews from the professional literature to get an idea about evaluation and writing reviews. Probably the best beginning source will be the reviews found in Booklist in its Reference Books Bulletin section, http://www.ala.org/booklist. The reviews are due separately from the reading journal, but, for access purposes, include these in your Portfolio when turned in. Group Participation (discussions), Exercises and Reference Services Analysis, and Reading Assignments Portfolio. Readings from the class text and other sources. You are required to keep a reading journal of items that you read from your textbook. Record at least 4 textbook readings, plus 2 external reading sources. This exercise should help you keep abreast of class discussions and assignments. See the form below for guidance in how to record your readings.

    Assignment: Reading from the Literature

    READING EVALUTION FORM Title with Bibliographic Citation: (Use Standard bibliographic citation manual, e.g., American Psychological Association, Style Manual, Modern Language Association) Date Read: Subject or topic (related to class outline): Central Premise or theme: Key Concepts: 1. 2. 3. Other discussion points or issues Group discussions. Please keep a record of at least 3 group exercises that you will be required to do during this course. As assignments may differ, please follow the instructions for each exercise as presented to you. Discussion reports should be well formatted and included in the portfolio with a date as to when the exercise was completed. See guide below. You may include information from the group, but be sure and add your own insights and observations. You will be expected to participate in all groups discussions.

    http://www.ala.org/booklist

  • Group discussions guide. Date: Title of the exercise (e.g., type resource/and or process under discussion) (make sure that you title it so that it relates to the module under discussion: Description of the Exercise: (e.g., answer typical references questions, analysis a process) Analysis: Statement of what you learned from this exercise: Include these in your portfolio Exercise and Process Portfolio. 1. As part of this portfolio find answers to at least 3 sets of sample questions in the resources modules. Following the general way that you find and cite reference questions. (This will be explained in class.) 2. Include 3 analysis exercises based on the reference services. (Select according to your interests.) Often these will be a part of the group discussions, and you may expand on those and provide your own insights. See above. Portfolio Order Arrange your portfolio in this order. Use tabs to divide sections.

    1. Readings 2. Reference resources exercises 3. Reference service analyses 4. Group reports (include at least 3) 5. Other items you wish to include (optional)

    Two Exams Two exams are required. These exams will be based on study questions provided to you. Many of these questions will be based on text readings and discussions in class. Both exams will require a field report. It is always helpful to move out of the classroom and into the world of action, so to speak, to see what is going on in professional life. You will select two field exercises to be submitted as part of each exam. For Exam 1: Interview someone about how and where they seek information. Consult Cassell and Hiremath, Ch. 2. Analyze and provide examples. Use the following guide: Field Assignment: Information Interview People describe, define, and seek information in various ways and in many different formats. Most people, if not all, have information needs. However, they often do that state those in ways that traditional institutions such as libraries are organized to accommodate their needs. For this exercise you are to select a person to interview about a recent information need and inquire as to how they went about getting that information. You may select someone you know or randomly select someone who might have reason to have needed information recently. Read on the theory of how people do or do not seek information (Lukenbill and Immroth, Health Information for Youth, p. 6; Lukenbill, Biography in the Lives of Youth, Ch. 4, pp.79-84). Do a little background reading about interviewing (we will discuss helping and information interviewing in the course of this class), prepare an interview protocol (questions to ask), practice with someone that you will not be interviewing; then when you feel

  • comfortable with your protocol, conduct the interview. After you have conducted your interview, write up a field report for submission. In your report include the following: Describe the person you interviewed. Describe how and why you selected this person for the interview. Describe the environment in which the interview took place (e.g., office, home,

    business, etc.) Provide an objective overview of the points made in the interview by the subject. Provide a critical analysis of the interview (e.g., what you discovered about how

    people define information, how they go about it, etc.). Somewhere in your interview make sure that you ask them about using a library

    to find the information that they needed. Observe how they respond to this important question.

    Provide any other useful information that might have emerged from the interview.

    Provide supplemental materials. Attach your interview questions. Attach a brief bibliography of sources you used to prepare for the interview. Attach any important notes you took during the interview. Be prepared to include this in Exam 1. For Exam 2: Visit a place where information is delivered and see how facilities either enhance or detract from this process. Use the following guide: Field Assignment: Facilities Operations Environment and facilities play important roles in how information is delivered. For this field exercise, you are to select a public place where information is given out in some form or style. Read in the literature something about facility design. It may be a public or school library or other public facility. Make sure that you select a site that is ample enough for you to observe a variety of activities and the interplay of facilities over the time that you visit. Depending on the circumstances, you may either inform them that you or observing their facilities or ask permission of the staff to observe their facilities. Remember that you are not observing people, but the environment in which they work and in which client interact with them. Make sure that you take into account these points: Provide an overview of the physical quarters. Describe the underlying philosophy behind the facility arrangement. (You can talk

    to the librarian or staff about this.) Describe the client group served by the program. Describe the types of programs and services provided based on your observations

    or public information provided. (E.g., handouts, news releases, conservation with staff, clients, etc.)

    Describe the staff and its characteristics as you observed them. Describe any unique characteristics of the site as you observed it. Make sure that you summarize, giving your critical analysis of facilities. Other observations as needed. Be prepared to include this in Exam 2.

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