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<ul><li><p>Read and Understand,Myths &amp; Legends</p><p>Stories &amp; Activities, Grades 46Read and Understand, Myths &amp; Legends is a resource book containing a variety of storiesaccompanied by practice materials for a wide spectrum of reading skills.</p><p>The 19 two- to three-page stories vary in reading difficulty from the beginning of grade 4through grade 6.</p><p>Each story is followed by three or four pages of activities for practicing reading skills such as:</p><p> comprehension vocabulary structural analysis figures of speech character analysis understanding plot development setting and mood</p><p>Congratulations on your purchase of some of the finest teaching materialsin the world.</p><p>For information about other Evan-Moor products, call 1-800-777-4362 or FAX 1-800-777-4332.Visit our Web site http://www.evan-moor.com. Check the Product Updates link for supplements, additions,</p><p>and corrections for this book.</p><p>Entire contents 2000 by EVAN-MOOR CORP.18 Lower Ragsdale Drive, Monterey, CA 93940-5746.</p><p>Permission is hereby granted to the individualpurchaser to reproduce student materials in this bookfor noncommercial individual or classroom use only.</p><p>Permission is not granted for schoolwide,or systemwide, reproduction of materials.</p><p>Printed in U.S.A.</p><p>Authors: Tekla White (stories),Jill Norris (activities)</p><p>Editor: Marilyn EvansCopy Editor: Cathy HarberIllustrator: Don RobisonDesigner: Shannon FredericksonCover Design: Shannon Frederickson EMC 759</p><p>Specific skills practiced are listed in the table of contents.</p><p>Stories and language activities can be used for small- and large-group lessons, cooperativelearning projects, and at-home reading practice.</p></li><li><p> 2000 by Evan-Moor Corp. 1 Myths &amp; Legends EMC 759</p><p>Table of Contents</p><p>and Roman Myths ...................................... 4</p><p>Arachnes Web ............................................ 5recall details, analyze characters, make inferences,make judgments, compare characters, word meaning,figurative language</p><p>Echo and Narcissus ................................ 11analyze characters, recall details, make inferences,draw conclusions, make judgments, wordconnotations, creative writing</p><p>Jason and the Golden Fleece ............... 17recall details, make inferences, draw conclusions,analyze characters, retell the story, categorizestory events, vocabulary</p><p>Orpheus and Eurydice ............................ 24summarize a story, make inferences, drawconclusions, story mood, express opinions,multiple meanings, synonyms</p><p>Pandora ...................................................... 31make inferences, recall details, draw conclusions,foreshadowing, symbolism</p><p>Psyche and Cupid.................................... 37recall details, make inferences, track story events,vocabulary</p><p>The Adventures of Perseus ................... 43recall details, draw conclusions, critical thinking,persuasive writing, word meaning, verbs and nouns,character description</p><p>The Seasons ............................................. 50draw conclusions, recall details, make inferences,critical thinking, word meaning, categorizing storyevents, creative writing</p><p>Theseus and the Minotaur &amp;</p><p>Introduction ................................................ 2</p><p>Introduction to Greek</p><p>Daedalus and Icarus ............................... 57recall details, make judgments, characterdescriptions, draw conclusions, make inferences,solve problems, word meaning, similes,personification</p><p>Introduction to Norse Myths ................. 65</p><p>(An Inuit Myth)........................................ 123recall details, write a summary, make inferences,analyze characters, word meaning, parts of speech</p><p>The Sky Woman</p><p>Thor and the Giants ................................ 67recall details, make inferences, synonyms,personification, support opinion</p><p>Thors Hammer ......................................... 74recall details, draw conclusions, word meaning,sequence story events, main ideas, prefixes</p><p>Balder the Good ....................................... 81recall details, draw conclusions, analyze characters,sequence story events, word meaning</p><p>Introduction to a World of Myths ......... 88</p><p>Gilgamesh and Enkidu(A Middle East Legend) .......................... 89</p><p>make inferences, draw conclusions, recall details,compare characters, synonyms, critical thinking</p><p>Maui and the Sun(A Hawaiian Myth) .................................... 96</p><p>recall details, draw conclusions, make inferences,personification, word meaning, synonyms, characteranalysis</p><p>The Earth and Sky</p><p>(An Onondaga Myth) ............................. 130recall details, draw conclusions, word meaning,setting</p><p>Answer Key ............................................. 137</p><p>(An African Myth)................................... 103recall details, draw conclusions, word meaning,prefixes, synonyms, antonyms, write descriptions</p><p>The Ten Suns (A Chinese Myth) ......... 109recall details, make inferences, analyze characters,descriptive verbs, write descriptions, multiplemeanings</p><p>How It All Began (A Mayan Myth) ...... 116recall details, sequence story events, writedescriptions, word meaning</p><p>Sedna, Goddess of the Sea</p></li><li><p> 2000 by Evan-Moor Corp. 2 Myths &amp; Legends EMC 759</p><p>IntroductionThe Stories</p><p>The Myths and LegendsMyths are stories that give reasons for things. Some mythsexplain natural events such as rainbows or the seasons. Somemyths tell how foods and agricultural tools were invented. Othersexplain how the world began. Myths about people and gods givereasons why people act the way they do. They are lessons thatprovide examples of good and bad behavior. Gods, goddesses,superhuman beings, and supernatural creatures such as Pegasus,the flying horse, are important in mythology.</p><p>A legend is a story that is not entirely invented. There may beplenty of exaggeration and fantasy in a legend, but at its heartthere is some historical truth. Legends have heroes whoperform great deeds with their strength and intelligence.Often heroes give up their dreams of happiness to help others.Their adventures can change the way they think and act.</p><p>All myths and legends are stories that were told and retold forhundreds or thousands of years before they were written down.</p><p>Ways to Use Myths &amp; Legends1. Directed lessons</p><p> with small groups of students reading at the same level with an individual student</p><p>2. Partner reading</p><p>3. With cooperative learning groups</p><p>4. Independent practice at school at home</p><p>Things to Consider1. Determine your purpose for selecting a storyinstructional</p><p>device, partner reading, group work, or independent reading.Each purpose calls for a different degree of story difficulty andsupport.</p><p>2. A single story may be used for more than one purpose. You might first use the story as aninstructional tool, have partners read the story a second time for greater fluency, andthen use the story at a later time for independent reading.</p><p>3. When presenting a story to a group or an individual for the first time, review any vocabularythat will be difficult to decode or understand. Many students will benefit from a review of thevocabulary page and the questions before they read the story.</p><p> 2000 by Eva</p><p>n-Moor Corp.</p><p>24</p><p>Myths &amp; Legend</p><p>s EMC 759</p><p>Orpheus and E</p><p>urydice</p><p>Orpheus </p><p>was given the g</p><p>ift of</p><p>music by the go</p><p>d Apollo. He</p><p>played his magic</p><p> lute wherever h</p><p>e</p><p>wandered. Wild </p><p>beasts rested</p><p>peacefully with </p><p>each other whe</p><p>n they</p><p>heard his songs</p><p>. Birds in the fo</p><p>rests</p><p>sang with the lu</p><p>te and rested o</p><p>n his</p><p>shoulders. Gods</p><p> and mortals we</p><p>re</p><p>enchanted by h</p><p>is music.</p><p>After he returne</p><p>d with Jason</p><p>and the Argona</p><p>uts from their qu</p><p>est</p><p>for the Golden F</p><p>leece, Orpheus </p><p>fell</p><p>in love with the b</p><p>eautiful Eurydic</p><p>e.</p><p>He serenaded h</p><p>er with love son</p><p>gs</p><p>until she agreed</p><p> to marry him.</p><p>On their weddin</p><p>g day, Eurydice</p><p>danced across </p><p>the meadow wit</p><p>h the</p><p>nymphs and mu</p><p>ses while Orph</p><p>eus</p><p>played his lute. B</p><p>ut alas, she step</p><p>ped</p><p>on a poisonous</p><p> snake, and it b</p><p>it her</p><p>ankle.</p><p>Eurydice cried </p><p>out in pain. Orp</p><p>heus ran to her</p><p> side, but he cou</p><p>ld not save</p><p>her. She died an</p><p>d was taken to H</p><p>ades Land of th</p><p>e Dead. Orpheu</p><p>s mourned.</p><p>His sad music b</p><p>rought tears to </p><p>all who heard h</p><p>is songs.</p><p>Overcome with s</p><p>orrow, Orpheus </p><p>went to Zeus. H</p><p>e asked the god</p><p>s</p><p>permission to g</p><p>o to the Land o</p><p>f the Dead and </p><p>beg Hades to re</p><p>lease Eurydice.</p><p>Zeus cautioned</p><p> him against the</p><p> journey. Its a d</p><p>angerous place,</p><p> he said.</p><p>No mortal has</p><p> traveled to Hade</p><p>s realm and ret</p><p>urned to Earth.</p><p>I will take that </p><p>risk, Orpheus a</p><p>nswered. I woul</p><p>d rather die the</p><p>re near</p><p>Eurydice than l</p><p>ive on Earth wit</p><p>hout her.</p><p>When Zeus cou</p><p>ld not persuade</p><p> Orpheus to give</p><p> up his quest, h</p><p>e</p><p>reluctantly gave</p><p> his permission</p><p> for the journey.</p><p> 2000 by Eva</p><p>n-Moor Corp.</p><p>50</p><p>Myths &amp; Legend</p><p>s EMC 759</p><p>Ceres, the</p><p> sister of Jupiter</p><p>, was the godde</p><p>ss of the Earth a</p><p>nd all the plants</p><p>and crops that </p><p>grew there. She</p><p> was kind to the</p><p> families who far</p><p>med the</p><p>Earth and help</p><p>ed them care fo</p><p>r the land.</p><p>Ceres loved her</p><p> daughter, the b</p><p>eautiful Proserp</p><p>ina, more than </p><p>anything</p><p>else. While Cere</p><p>s went about he</p><p>r work, Proserp</p><p>ina gathered bo</p><p>uquets of flowe</p><p>rs.</p><p>Everywhere Pr</p><p>oserpina walke</p><p>d, flowers bloom</p><p>ed. Her laugh b</p><p>rought joy to</p><p>everyone.</p><p>One day Pluto,</p><p> the god of the U</p><p>nderworld, saw</p><p> Proserpina da</p><p>ncing in the</p><p>meadow. He fell</p><p> in love with her</p><p> and wished to m</p><p>arry her. Even t</p><p>hough his realm</p><p>was large and fi</p><p>lled with gold an</p><p>d precious stone</p><p>s, he knew Cere</p><p>s would never</p><p>allow Proserpin</p><p>a to journey to </p><p>his faraway kingd</p><p>om.</p><p>Pluto decided to</p><p> kidnap Proserp</p><p>ina and carry h</p><p>er off to the Und</p><p>erworld.</p><p>Surely, he reas</p><p>oned, when she</p><p> saw how kind h</p><p>e could be, she</p><p> would fall in lov</p><p>e</p><p>with him and ag</p><p>ree to marry him</p><p>. Then she could</p><p> rule happily as</p><p> Queen of the</p><p>Dead and bright</p><p>en his dreary da</p><p>ys.</p><p>Pluto used his m</p><p>agic powers to c</p><p>reate a beautifu</p><p>l flower that was</p><p> like no</p><p>other. He set th</p><p>e flower in the e</p><p>arth at the edge</p><p> of the woods. H</p><p>idden by the</p><p>trees, Pluto wai</p><p>ted with his hor</p><p>ses and golden</p><p> chariot.</p><p>Proserpina ran </p><p>toward the flow</p><p>er, intending to </p><p>add it to her bas</p><p>ket. When</p><p>she knelt to look</p><p> at the flower, P</p><p>luto raced by. H</p><p>e gathered her </p><p>up in his arms,</p><p>and his chariot </p><p>sped off, circlin</p><p>g the Earth.</p><p>The Seasons</p><p> 2000 by Eva</p><p>n-Moor Corp.</p><p>116</p><p>Myths &amp; Legend</p><p>s EMC 759</p><p>How It All Be</p><p>gan</p><p>A Quiche Mayan M</p><p>yth from Guatema</p><p>la</p><p>At the beg</p><p>inning of time, t</p><p>he Creator, who</p><p> was the mother</p><p> and father of</p><p>everything that </p><p>existed, looked </p><p>around. Within </p><p>the four corners</p><p> and four sides</p><p>of the universe,</p><p> there were no p</p><p>eople or anima</p><p>ls to praise him.</p><p> No birds, fish,</p><p>crabs, trees, ro</p><p>cks, holes, cany</p><p>ons, straw, or r</p><p>eeds could be f</p><p>ound. There wa</p><p>s</p><p>nothing. No noi</p><p>se could be hea</p><p>rd in the sky. Th</p><p>e sea floated thr</p><p>ough space. It, t</p><p>oo,</p><p>was calm and l</p><p>ifeless.</p><p>The Creator set</p><p> to work to fill th</p><p>e great void. Fir</p><p>st the Earth app</p><p>eared. It was</p><p>formed from the</p><p> dust and mists </p><p>that swirled thro</p><p>ugh the univers</p><p>e. There were</p><p>plains, mountain</p><p>s, canyons, and</p><p> rivers. Then cam</p><p>e the deer, birds</p><p>, snakes, and</p><p>other animals. T</p><p>hey were given </p><p>homes on Eart</p><p>h. The birds wer</p><p>e told to live in t</p><p>he</p><p>trees and reeds</p><p> and were taugh</p><p>t how to fly. The</p><p> Creator showe</p><p>d some animals</p><p>how to walk on fo</p><p>ur feet, and oth</p><p>er creatures, lik</p><p>e the snake, how</p><p> to crawl on the</p><p>ground.</p></li><li><p> 2000 by Evan-Moor Corp. 3 Myths &amp; Legends EMC 759</p><p>Types of Skill PagesThree or four pages of activities covering a wide variety ofreading skills follow each story:</p><p> comprehension</p><p> vocabulary</p><p> structural analysis</p><p> figures of speech</p><p> character analysis</p><p> understanding plot development</p><p> setting and mood</p><p>Ways to Use the Skill Pages1. Individualize skill practice for each student with tasks that are appropriate for his or her needs.</p><p>2. As directed minilessons, the skill pages may be used inseveral ways:</p><p> Make a transparency for students to follow as youwork through the lesson.</p><p> Write the activity on the board and call on studentsto fill in the answers.</p><p> Reproduce the page for everyone to use as youdirect the lesson.</p><p>3. When using the skill pages for independent practice, makesure that the skills have been introduced to the reader.Review the directions and check for understanding. Reviewthe completed lesson with the student to determine if furtherpractice is needed.</p><p>Skills PagesName </p><p> 2000 by Eva</p><p>n-Moor Corp.</p><p>29</p><p>Myths &amp; Legend</p><p>s EMC 759</p><p>Orpheus and</p><p> Eurydice</p><p>Establishing</p><p> Mood</p><p>Word Box</p><p>criedserenad</p><p>edlamente</p><p>dhappine</p><p>ss</p><p>enchanted</p><p>lulledpeace</p><p>sunlight</p><p>mourned</p><p>charmed</p><p>sorrowfoolishn</p><p>ess</p><p>Sad Words</p><p>Happy Words</p><p>1. Write the wor</p><p>ds from the Wo</p><p>rd Box in the co</p><p>rrect column.</p><p>2. Which word is</p><p> a synonym for e</p><p>nchanted ?</p><p>3. Which word is</p><p> a synonym for m</p><p>ourned ?</p><p>In Orpheus and</p><p> Eurydice many </p><p>of the words us</p><p>ed create a fee</p><p>ling of happines</p><p>s or sadness.</p><p>Name </p><p> 2000 by Eva</p><p>n-Moor Corp.</p><p>55</p><p>Myths &amp; Legend</p><p>s EMC 759</p><p>The Seasons</p><p>Categorizin</p><p>g Events</p><p>What seasonal o</p><p>ccurrences wou</p><p>ld you classify a</p><p>s Ceres blessin</p><p>gs? Which ones</p><p> could be</p><p>classified as Ce</p><p>res forgetfulnes</p><p>s? Fill in the cha</p><p>rt below to answ</p><p>er the questions</p><p>.</p><p>Ceres Blessing</p><p>s</p><p>Ceres Forgetfu</p><p>lness</p><p>Name </p><p> 2000 by Eva</p><p>n-Moor Corp.</p><p>121</p><p>Myths &amp; Legend</p><p>s EMC 759</p><p>How It All B</p><p>egan</p><p>Rememberi</p><p>ng Details</p><p>1. Write each d</p><p>escription below</p><p> under the nam</p><p>e of the group i</p><p>t describes.</p><p>Mud People</p><p>Wood People</p><p>Corn People</p><p>unfeeling</p><p>turned into mon</p><p>keys</p><p>dissolved in wat</p><p>er</p><p>ancestors of hu</p><p>man race</p><p>expressions nev</p><p>er changed</p><p>first people crea</p><p>ted</p><p>strong and heal</p><p>thy</p><p>made noise, bu</p><p>t couldnt think</p><p>too soft</p><p>their words had</p><p> no meaning</p><p>too perfect</p><p>2. Use the phra</p><p>ses above to wr</p><p>ite a description</p><p> of each type of</p><p> people created</p><p>.</p><p>Mud People </p><p>Wood People </p><p>Corn People </p></li><li><p> 2000 by Evan-Moor Corp. 4 Myths &amp; Legends EMC 759</p><p>The ancient Greeks, like many peoples, tried to explain the mysteries of</p><p>nature and how things came to be. They lacked the scientific knowledge that we</p><p>have today, so they created many gods and goddessespowerful beings who rule</p><p>storms, seasons, stars, the growing of things, love, death, and everyday life.</p><p>According to the Greek myths, the gods and goddesses lived on top of a</p><p>mountain that was too high for people to climb. The mountain was called Olympus.</p><p>The gods and goddesses often visited Earth, sometimes disguised as animals or</p><p>people.</p><p>People built temples dedicated to these gods and goddesses. They left</p><p>offerings and prayed in the temples for the help of the gods and goddesses. Often</p><p>homes would have a shrine dedicated to a god or goddess.</p><p>As with all stories that are told, myths grew and changed through the years.</p><p>Some of the Greek myths and legends were written as early as 750 to 700 B.C.</p><p>When the Romans conquered the Greeks, they took over the Greek gods</p><p>and goddesses. They gave them Roman names.</p><p>Here are some of the names of Greek and Roman gods and goddesses and</p><p>other characters mentioned in this book. Roman names are written in parentheses.</p><p>Introduction to Greek and Roman Myths</p><p>AAAAAppppphhhhhrrrrrodododododiiiiittttte (e (e (e (e (VVVVVeeeeennnnnuuuuus)-s)-s)-s)-s)-the goddess of love and beauty</p><p>AAAAAttttthhhhheeeeennnnna (Ma (Ma (Ma (Ma (Miiiiinnnnneeeeerrrrrvvvvva)a)a)a)a)the goddess of wisdom and war</p><p>DeDeDeDeDemmmmmeeeeettttteeeeer (Cr (Cr (Cr (Cr (C...</p></li></ul>

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