Onward Walnut Cove NC Main Street Revitalization Plan

  • Published on
    27-Jul-2016

  • View
    214

  • Download
    2

DESCRIPTION

 

Transcript

  • MAIN STREET REVITALIZATION PLAN

    ONWARDNORTHCAROLINA

  • Destination by Design Planning, LLC | 815 West King Street, Suite 2 | Boone, North Carolina 28607 | 828.386.1866 | www.DbDplanning.com

    PRODUCED FOR

    PRODUCED BY

    The Town of Walnut Cove

    MAIN STREET REVITALIZATION PLAN

    ONWARDNORTHCAROLINA

  • acknowledgments

    LYNN LEWISMAYOR

    ELWOOD MABEMAYOR PRO TEM

    SHARON CONAWAYCOMMISSIONER

    DANNY HAIRSTONCOMMISSIONER

    CHARLES MITCHELLCOMMISSIONER

  • /INTRODUCTIONMain Street: A Strategic Economic Development Priority

    table of contents

    /01 EXISTING CONDITIONS & ANALYSISOpportunities and Constraints: A Foundation for Practical Solutions

    /02 RECOMMENDATIONSInfrastructure Investments to Grow and Develop Small Business

    /03 IMPLEMENTATIONRealistic Strategies to Phase and Finance Improvements

  • OUR ROOTS RUN DEEP

  • LET'S DEVELOP A VISION FOR MAIN STREET

    This chapter provides a background and overview for the Walnut Cove Main Street Revitalization planning effort. Described are specific plan objectives and the planning process used by town leaders as well as the planning & design consultant team. This chapter concludes with an overview of the Main Street Revitalization Plan public workshop held on December 4, 2015.

    IN THIS CHAPTER Background and Purpose Plan Objectives Plan Process Public Engagement

    INTRODUCTION

    I

  • 2I N T R O D U C T I O N

    WALNUT COVE: A NORTH CAROLINA SMALL TOWN MAIN STREET COMMUNITYSince 2005, Walnut Cove has been recognized by the NC Department of Commerce as an NC Small Town Main Street Community. With this designation comes a responsibility to work toward an ever-improving Main Street. The Walnut Cove Main Street Committee has worked tirelessly to improve downtown aesthetics and conduct community events. This planning effort will further support of the work of this Committee.

    THE MAIN STREET FOUR POINT APPROACHThe NC Small Town Main Street Program recognizes the National Main Street Centers Four Point Approach, which includes Organization, Promotion, Design, and Economic Restructuring. Each of these elements is critical for ensuring that Main Street remains vibrant and suitable for small business growth and development. Although this plan addresses, to some extent, all elements of the Main Street Four Point Approach, this plans core focus is design and specifically Walnut Coves streetscape and public space.

    From August 2013 to May 2015, the Town of Walnut Cove worked alongside Stokes County and its other municipal jurisdictions to create a unified vision -- the Stokes 2035 Vision Plan. After a series of public visioning workshops and intensive focus groups throughout the planning process, there was clear consensus among local leaders and citizens that any economic development strategy must include the revitalization of Downtown Walnut Cove.

    After adopting the Stokes 2035 Vision Plan, the Walnut Cove Town Commissioners pursued and successfully secured grant funding from the NC Department of Commerce to develop the Main Street Revitalization Plan. This plan represents the first initiative as part of the Stokes 2035 Vision Plan to be implemented by a local governing body. This plan and its process is critical for developing consensus among downtown landowners and NCDOT, as well as to communicate to potential grant funding agencies that can help provide financial assistance to implement proposed streetscape and other downtown improvements.

    STOKESCOUNTYSTOKESSTOKES 203520352035COUNTYCOUNTYm o v i n g t o g e t h e r

    Public workshops during the Stokes 2035 vision plan revealed a need for an in-depth plan to revitalize Downtown Walnut Cove.

    stokes 2035 vision plan

    #1AESTHETICSImprove the

    aesthetic appearance and

    economic welfare of the downtown.

    #2PRESERVATION

    Encourage the rehabilitation of existing historic

    structures.

    #3SAFETY

    Address existing safety concerns associated with

    deteriorated buildings.

    #4COMPATIBILITY

    Ensure the compatibility of

    development and redevelopment.

    #5FINANCING

    Provide recommendations

    for financing public improvements.

    #6INVESTMENT

    Identify strategic public-private partnerships

    opportunities.

    PLAN OBJECTIVES

    Although this plan addresses to some extent all elements of the Main Street Four Point Approach, this plan's core focus is design and

    specifically Walnut Coves streetscape and public space.

    THE NORTH

    CARO

    LINA MAIN STREET PROGRAM

    FOUR POINT APPROA

    CH

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

  • 3I N T R O D U C T I O N

    PLANNING PROCESS

    Finalize the study areaboundary

    Develop plan informationmaterials: Project Brandand Fact Sheet

    Town Commissionpresentation and requestto proceed

    Existing Conditions DataCollection

    Property and StructuralEvaluation

    Framework Plan

    NCDOT, USDA meeting

    Streetscape Plan

    Faade Plan

    Landowner Outreach

    Final Plan Preparation

    Financing and GrantDocumentation

    Final Plan Presentation

    MARCH-AUGUST, 2015 AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 2015 SEPTEMBER - DECEMBER, 2015 DECEMBER-FEBRUARY, 2015-16

    DIREC

    TION S

    ETTING

    analy

    sis &

    fram

    ewor

    k pla

    n

    plan

    deve

    lopm

    ent

    final

    plan

    deve

    lopm

    ent

    MAIN STREET REVITALIZATION PLAN

    ONWARDNORTHCAROLINA

    Landowner & PublicWorkshop

    Plan revisions based uponpublic input

    DECEMBER, 2015

    publ

    ic en

    gage

    ment

  • LET'S CONSIDER WALNUT COVE'S OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS TO HELP ESTABLISH CLEAR AND PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR IMPROVING ITS INFRASTRUCTURE.

    This chapter provides a snapshot of Walnut Coves existing conditions and their implications for future development and redevelopment. Here we explore the towns regional context, land use patterns, zoning, and sidewalk network. Walnut Coves Main Street has both opportunities and constraints that when considered, provide a foundation for establishing clear and practical solutions for improving its infrastructure.

    IN THIS CHAPTER A brief overview of Downtown Walnut Cove Opportunities and Challenges Existing Conditions Photograph Series Analysis Map Series

    existing conditions & analysis

    1

  • 6C H A P T E R O N E

    THE BIG VISION: CREATE A WELCOMING DOWNTOWN ENVIRONMENT THAT WILL ATTRACT LOCALS AND VISITORS MORNING, DAY, AND NIGHT.

    OPPORTUNITIES Walnut Cove has a traditional street grid layout and historical buildings worthy of revitalization. A significant number of buildings and tracts are vacant or undeveloped leaving opportunities for new

    construction and infill development.

    More than 11,000 cars travel Main Street each day. With a major public infrastructure investment, new businesses will be attracted to Walnut Cove.

    CHALLENGES A significant amount of

    traffic travels through Walnut Cove, but a small percentage of these travelers stop to visit Main Street.

    Several historic structures need major repair. Major streetscape improvements will require a significant

    financial investment from the town.

    OUR ROOTS RUN DEEPTHE BIG PICTURE

    vacancies & repairs

    Several buildings are in need of repair or lay vacant.

    One current opportunity for Walnut Cove is its existing network of

    neighborhood blocks that, with the addition of sidewalks, would create

    a walkable community.

    11,000 CARS / DAYcars & NEIGHBORHOOD BLOCKS

    Search Walnut Cove North Carolina in the 1940s on YouTube.

    Stills from the video Walnut Cove North Carolina in the 1940s.

    SEE WALNUT COVE OF THE 40S

  • E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S & A N A L Y S I S

    7

    EXISTING CONDITIONS

    1

    4

    6

    5

    2 3

    PHOTOS:(1) Parking to the sides or rear of buildings, rather than the front, makes for a more comfortable pedestrian experience.

    (2) The Old Theater is a significant cultural asset and worthy of renovation.

    (3) Downtown Main Street has a wide right-of-way, providing an opportunity for an enhanced streetscape.

    (4) Fowler Park and the library serve as community spaces; Fowler Park could be improved to provide for more community programs.

    (5) Antique stores along Main St. help to build upon the downtowns character and attract visitors to Walnut Cove.

    (6) Some buildings on Main St. are unfortunately beyond repair.

  • 8C H A P T E R O N EC H A P T E R O N E

    8

    89

    311

    311

    65

    LAKE SIDE

    SPRINGDALE

    OAK

    OLDTO

    WN

    COUNTRY M

    EADOWS

    CLUBSU

    MMIT

    FLINCHU

    M FARM

    OLD TOW

    N

    RIDGE

    SUMMIT

    MAIN ST.

    WINDMILL

    BROAD

    REGENCY APTS

    SMITH

    HERITAGE

    FOWLER

    WELLINGTON

    REGENCY

    MILLBROOK

    MITCHELL

    HAIRSTON

    SCHOOLG

    REENWA

    Y OPPORTUNIT

    Y

    WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

    PROPOSED TRUCK ROUTE

    SEVENTH

    NINTH

    SIXTH

    FIFTH

    EIGHT

    HIGH

    FOURTH

    THIRD

    SECOND

    DEPOT

    BROOK COVE

    WWTP

    WELL

    HOUSE

    TOWN FORK CREEK

    MILLS CRE

    EK

    10MINUTEWALK

    5MINUTEWALK

    LEGE

    ND

    GREENWAY OPPORTUNITY

    EXISTING SIDEWALK CONNECTOR

    PROPOSED TRUCK ROUTE

    COMMERCIAL NODE

    MEADOW BROOK FIELD

    SCHOOL

    POST OFFICE

    TOWN HALL

    FOWLER PARK

    LIBRARY

    FIRE STATION

    POINTS OF INTEREST

    TRANSPORTATION

    NORT

    H

    SCAL

    E

    0 125 250 500 FEET

    20MINUTE DRIVE

    TOHANGING ROCKSTATE PARK

    30MINUTE DRIVE

    TOWINSTON -SALEM

    Walnut Cove is situated within a unique geographic context. Lets consider the following:

    The town is well-positioned between a major city (Winston-Salem) and North Carolinas most visited state park (Hanging Rock).

    More than 11,000 cars each day can utilize Highway 311/89 through the heart of downtown.

    Oldtown Road could potentially serve as a route for large trucks so they might avoid downtown.

    Creeks, streams, and their floodplains surround Walnut Coves downtown, creating an ideal opportunity for establishing a network of multi-use trails and greenways.

    context

    HANGING ROCK STATE PARK

    WINSTON SALEM

  • E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S & A N A L Y S I S

    9

    MAIN

    HIGH

    SUMMITFO

    UR

    TH

    SIX

    TH

    THIR

    D

    WINDMILL

    MITCHELL

    SE

    CO

    ND

    FIFT

    H

    RID

    GE

    DEPOT

    VALLEY

    FIRST/OLDTOWN

    BROAD

    HAIRSTON

    BRO

    OK C

    OVE

    SIXTH

    FIRS

    T/OLD

    TOW

    N

    NC OneMap, NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, NC 911 Board

    DEPOT

    BROOK COVE

    MITCHELL

    WINDMILLPROJECT STUDY AREA

    SUMMIT

    HIGH

    RIDGE

    HAIRSTON

    BROAD

    5TH 6TH4TH3RD2ND1ST

    MAIN ST. MAIN ST.

    ALLEYS

    JUST PLAIN COUNTRY

    TUTTLE HARDWARE

    ROLLERMILLS

    SAMSPIZZA

    TOWN F

    ORK C

    REEK

    MILLS CREEK

    LEGE

    ND

    NORT

    H

    SCAL

    E

    COMMERCIAL - RETAIL

    COMMERCIAL - SERVICE

    GOVERNMENT & INSTITUTIONAL

    LIGHT INDUSTRY

    MULTI FAMILY

    SINGLE FAMILY

    UNDEVELOPED

    VACANT

    POST OFFICE

    TOWN HALL

    FOWLER PARK

    LIBRARY

    FIRE STATION

    ASSETS LAND USE

    0 125 250 500 FEET

    MAIN

    HIGH

    SUMMIT

    FOU

    RTH

    SIX

    TH

    THIR

    D

    WINDMILL

    MITCHELL

    SE

    CO

    ND

    FIFT

    H

    RID

    GE

    DEPOT

    VALLEY

    FIRST/OLDTOWN

    BROAD

    HAIRSTON

    K CO

    VE

    SIXTH

    FIRS

    T/OLD

    TOW

    NNC OneMap, NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, NC 911 Board

    DEPOT

    BROOK COVE

    MITCHELL

    WINDMILLPROJECT STUDY AREA

    SUMMIT

    HIGHRIDGE

    HAIRSTON

    BROAD

    5TH 6TH4TH3RD2ND1ST

    MAIN ST. MAIN ST.

    ALLEYS

    JUST PLAIN COUNTRY

    TUTTLE HARDWARE

    ROLLERMILLS

    SAMSPIZZA

    TOWN F

    ORK C

    REEK

    MILLS CREEK

    LEGE

    ND

    NORT

    H

    SCAL

    E

    MIXED-USE

    CIVIC

    OPEN SPACE

    POST OFFICE

    TOWN HALL

    FOWLER PARK

    LIBRARY

    FIRE STATION

    ASSETS ZONING

    0 125 250 500 FEET

    Walnut Cove is a classic small town Main Street community. Lets consider the following:

    The town has three government/ institutional areas including, the post office, town hall, and the northwest block that includes the library, Fowler Park, and the fire station.

    Main Street provides for a mix of commercial retail and service businesses. There are three single-family homes and one multi-family complex within the

    study area; there are no active residences above retail downtown.

    There are several vacant properties that provide an opportunity for in-fill development.

    Walnut Coves ordinance provides for mixed-use zoning in its downtown. However, the town must ensure the following are required within this zoning district:

    75% of Main Street frontage should be occupied by a building Parking areas should be placed on side or rear and must be appropriately

    screened

    Building fronts should contain approximately 60% windows on Main Street. Entrances must face Main Street.

    *Recommended zoning changes are outlined in Chapter 3

    land use existing zoning

  • 10

    C H A P T E R O N E

    MAIN

    HIGH

    SUMMIT

    FOU

    RTH

    SIX

    TH

    THIR

    D

    WINDMILL

    MITCHELL

    SE

    CO

    ND

    FIFT

    H

    RID

    GE

    DEPOT

    VALLEY

    FIRST/OLDTOWN

    BROAD

    HAIRSTON

    SIXTH

    FIRS

    T/OLD

    TOW

    N

    NC OneMap, NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, NC 911 Board

    DEPOT

    K COVE

    MITCHELL

    WINDMILLPROJECT STUDY AREA

    SUMMIT

    HIGH

    RIDGE

    HAIRSTON

    BROAD

    5TH 6TH4TH3RD2ND1ST

    MAIN ST. MAIN ST.

    TUTTLE HARDWARE

    ROLLERMILLS

    SAMSPIZZA

    ALLEYS

    JUST PLAIN COUNTRY

    TOWN F

    ORK C

    REEK

    MILLS CREEK

    LEGE

    ND

    NORT

    H

    SCAL

    E

    POST OFFICE

    TOWN HALL

    FOWLER PARK

    LIBRARY

    FIRE STATION

    UNDEVELOPED(no buildings)

    VACANT(closed buildings)

    ASSETS OPPORTUNITIES FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION

    0 125 250 500 FEET

    opportunities for new constructionAlthough Walnut Cove is anchored with a historic downtown infrastructure, there exists opportunities for new in-fill mixed-use development. Lets consider the following:

    The town has control of two significant properties, including the old hotel site at 2nd and Main and a vacant lot adjacent to the old dentist building at 5th and Main. This plan provides specific recommendations for the old hotel property.

    The downtowns main intersection, located at 3rd and Main, has two undeveloped corners. These properties currently provide for parking and outdoor storage, but the town should welcome new and appropriate development at these locations.

    An opportunity exists along Windmill Street between 4th and 5th streets. One parcel is fully vacant, while the tract along 5th is underutilized. These locations would serve as prime locations for dense multi-family housing.

    INTERSECTION OF 3RD & MAIN ST

    INTERSECTION NEAR 2ND & MAIN ST

  • 11

    E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S & A N A L Y S I S

    MAIN

    HIGH

    SUMMIT

    FOU

    RTH

    SIX

    TH

    THIR

    D

    WINDMILL

    MITCHELL

    SE

    CO

    ND

    FIFT

    H

    RID

    GE

    DEPOT

    VALLEY

    FIRST/OLDTOWN

    BROAD

    HAIRSTON

    BRO

    OK C

    OVE

    SIXTH

    FIRS

    T/OLD

    TOW

    N

    NC OneMap, NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, NC 911 Board

    DEPOT

    BROOK COVE

    MITCHELL

    WINDMILLPROJECT STUDY AREA

    SUMMIT

    HIGH

    RIDGE

    HAIRSTON

    BROAD

    5TH 6TH4TH3RD2ND1ST

    MAIN ST. MAIN ST.

    ALLEYS

    JUST PLAIN COUNTRY

    TUTTLE HARDWARE

    ROLLERMILLS

    SAMSPIZZA

    TOWN F

    ORK C

    REEK

    MILLS CREEK

    1

    2

    LEGE

    ND

    NORT

    H

    SCAL

    E

    GATEWAY

    100% INTERSECTION

    EXISTING SIDEWALKS

    OLD HOTEL

    FOWLER PARK

    POST OFFICE

    TOWN HALL

    FOWLER PARK

    LIBRARY

    FIRE STATION

    ASSETS EXISTING STREETSCAPE INFRASTRUCTURE

    SITE STUDY AREAS

    120 125 250 500 FEET

    framework planWith strategic public infrastructure investments and strong leadership, Walnut Cove can generate small business growth on Main Street. Lets consider the following:

    1. ATTRACTIVE GATEWAYS

    The south and north gateways into downtown provide opportunities to slow traffic, welcome locals and visitors, and begin telling the story of Walnut Cove.

    2. ENHANCE FOWLER PARK

    An enhanced Fowler Park, which is located at the downtowns north gateway, can provide unique programming opportunities that can regularly attract downtown visitors.

    3. IMPROVE WALKABILITY

    The downtown sidewalk system currently has some gaps, which are the result of extensive parking lot and driveway cuts. Design improvements within these areas should signal motorists of the likelihood of pedestrian users.

  • C H A P T E R O N E

    12

    On December 3rd, the planning consultant team presented multiple concepts for improving Walnut Coves Main Street and other town properties. This meeting was advertised through the newspaper and property owners

    within the study area were sent a meeting invitation.

    December 3rd, 2015 public meeting

    PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

  • A TOOLBOX TO HELP THE TOWN AND PRIVATE BUSINESSES ENSURE A LIVELY AND PEDESTRIAN-ORIENTED MAIN STREET

    The design guidelines chapter begins with a brief description of the pedestrian triangle - the most critical area for influencing the pedestrian experience. Following this introduction, specific guidelines are set forth for the public sector and private businesses with a central goal: generate economic activity in downtown Walnut Cove.

    IN THIS CHAPTER The Pedestrian Triangle Design Guidelines for the Public Sector Design Guidelines for Private Businesses

    DESIGN GUIDELINESpriv

    ate

    public

    SHOP

    2

  • 14

    C H A P T E R T W O

    THE REVITALIZATION OF WALNUT COVE WILL REQUIRE A SUBSTANTIAL EFFORT FROM BOTH THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE REALMS.

    priv

    ate

    public

    PEDESTRIAN SCALE LIGHTING

    ON-STREET PARKING

    STRATEGICALLY PLACED STREET TREES

    SITE FURNISHINGSWI

    DE

    SIDEW

    ALKS

    CROSSWALKS

    a public & private relationship

    RESIDENTIAL/ OFFICE UPPER STORIES

    ACTIVE GROUND FLOOR

    SIDEWALK INTEREST

    SEASONAL PLANTERS

    MANY DOORS & WINDOWS

    The pedestrian triangle is where the public and private realms meet. Within this triangle,,

    Walnut Cove must create a safe and inviting space.

    pedestrian triangle

  • 15

    D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S

    #1PARKS, OPEN

    SPACES & THIRD PLACES

    #2LANDSCAPING &

    STREET TREES

    #3SIDEWALKS

    #4PARKING

    #5SITE

    FURNISHINGS & INFRASTRUCTURE

    #6BUILDINGS

    #7BRANDING

    #8PROGRAMMING

    PUBLIC Lets talk economic development, tourism, and

    community development; there is absolutely, positively

    NOTHING THATS MORE IMPORTANT THAN YOUR DOWNTOWN.

    THE SUBSEQUENT PAGES DESCRIBE EIGHT CONSIDERATIONS THAT WILL BE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE TOWN OF WALNUT COVE.

    pu

    blic

  • C H A P T E R T W O

    16

    PARKS, OPEN SPACES & THIRD PLACES

    public spaces and parksPublic spaces and parks attract people downtown.

    Farmers marketCreate a downtown Farmers Market. The downtown shopping atmosphere and farmers market can attract customers downtown to spend money.

    alleywaysAlleyways are an asset. They provide a unique opportunities for smaller retail spaces; building owners can subdivide their building interiors and provide for an entry into the alleyway. Consider making an alleyway pedestrian-only and inviting for the public by using lighting, ground plane materials, and public art.

    third placesIn contrast to first places (home) and second places (work),

    third places provide space for community gatherings.

    #1Farmers markets

    alleyways

    Farmers markets are great third places to meet other community members outside of home and work.

    Alleyways are an often overlooked public space.

    Downtown parks are great places for the community to gather for

    holidays and events.

    Downtown parks

  • 17

    D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S

    LANDSCAPING & STREET TREESlandscapingAdding landscaping to public areas makes a community more vibrant and inviting. Simple features like hanging baskets on light posts can have a big impact.

    street treesThe use of trees and landscaping helps to separate pedestrians from motor vehicle traffic. Plants also provide interest; they soften the appearance of hard surfaces and provide color, fragrance, and seasonal decor. Other benefits of street trees include providing shade in areas where there is extensive pavement.

    #2

    street trees

    Public landscaping along Main Street can significantly improve

    the pedestrian experience.

    Street trees frame the street and provide pedestrian refuge from vehicles.

    public landscaping

    pu

    blic

  • C H A P T E R T W O

    18

    SIDEWALKSdesign for people first!Pedestrian infrastructure is critical. Streetscape design elements, such as curb extensions and colored concrete crosswalks, create safer pedestrian environments.

    MAKE IT WIDE!A wide sidewalk provides ample room for downtown activity including outdoor dining areas, street furniture, and small gatherings.

    #3

    Wide sidewalks are desirable and provide opportunities for a range

    of activities.

    A continuous network of sidewalks and crosswalks establish a pedestrian-oriented environment.

    Curb extension bump outs allow pedestrians to cross the street in a

    shorter distance and help slow traffic.

    wide sidewalks

    crosswalks

    curb extensions

  • 19

    D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S

    PARKINGon-street parking On-street parking provides consumers with easy access to downtown businesses and creates a buffer between traffic and sidewalks.

    take it out back! (Or at least to the side)Parking lots in front of downtown businesses disrupt a continuous building street wall, which is more inviting to pedestrians. Locate surface parking areas behind (preferable) or to the side of the principal building line and buffer the lot from the sidewalk with landscaping or low walls and fences.

    retrofit existing lotsExisting parking lots can be enhanced by landscaping and/or low retaining walls.

    shade treesWhere possible, provide shade trees for larger parking lots.

    #4

    Existing parking lots can be screened with seat walls,

    landscaping, and public art.

    On-street parking helps to create a barrier between pedestrians and motorists.

    existing parking lots

    on-street parking

    pu

    blic

  • C H A P T E R T W O

    20

    SITE FURNISHINGS & INFRASTRUCTURE

    if you build it, they will come!Provide the necessary infrastructure to support a vibrant downtown.

    LIGHTING. Consider both pedestrian and vehicular lighting.

    SEATING. Benches, seatwalls, rocking chairs, and artistic yet functional seating should all be considered.

    LITTER RECEPTACLES. Litter receptacles can be installed along with other street furniture in a similar style to help create continuity.

    DRINKING FOUNTAINS. These can be creative. Also, dont forget about dogs!

    RESTROOMS. Public restrooms are a great downtown asset.

    SIGNAGE AND WAYFINDING. Town banners and directional signs help navigate downtown visitors.

    BASE FOR PUBLIC ART. Provide the structural base for art exhibits.

    BICYCLE RACKS. Bike racks can be a work of art!

    #5

    Lighting and trash receptacles can add to community character.

    Artful drinking fountains can provide a creative touch to downtown.

    Provide a permanent base

    for art exhibits.

    drinking fountains

    public art

    wayfinding signsWayfinding helps customers find downtown businesses!

    lighting & trash receptacles

  • 21

    D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S

    BUILDINGSThe Street wallA street wall is created when buildings are located next to one another without any disruption. Extended street walls are critical for a healthy downtown. For this reason, parking lots should be placed on the side or rear of buildings and In-fill development is strongly encouraged.

    mixed-useEncourage multi-story buildings that provide for mixed-uses. Healthy downtowns provide for a mix of land uses that allow both commercial spaces, such as retail shops, galleries and restaurants, and residential units, such as loft apartments and townhouses. Greater density and mixed-uses are achieved through zoning that allows and provides incentives for residential uses in downtowns. Maximum setbacks will be required to ensure that buildings front along the street and adjacent to sidewalks or low retaining walls.

    faade improvement programVoluntary Faade Improvement Programs reimburse businesses for a portion of the faade improvement costs.

    #6

    street wall

    mixed use

    Maintain and continue the street wall as it is one of the principal defining characteristics of the downtown district.

    Mixed use buildings can utilize the ground floor for commerce and upper levels for residential housing. People living downtown is what makes downtown come alive!

    MAINTA IN THE STREET WALL !

    LIVE HERE

    WORK HERE

    pu

    blic

  • C H A P T E R T W O

    22

    BRANDINGWho is walnut cove? Create a unique, recognizable brand for Walnut Cove. Having a community brand helps create a perception that the locale is business-friendly, innovative, energetic, etc. The theme of the brand can be utilized on:

    Gateways; Monument Signs; Banners; and Wayfinding Signage.

    #7

    PROPOSED BRANDING FOR WALNUT COVE

    Create a unique, recognizable brand for Walnut Cove.

    create a unique brand

    Monument signs are often the first thing visitors see and signify the

    gateway to your town.

    MONUMENT SIGNS

    CREATIVE BANNERS

    banner concept

    Banners help tell the story of your town and can be custom designed

    to highlight festivals, events and seasons.

    ENJOYSummertimein Our Town

    Our Roots Run Deep

    proposed town logo & slogan

  • 23

    D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S

    PROGRAMMINGCREATE YEAR-ROUND DOWNTOWN ACTIVITIESSchedule civic activities, such as street festivals and outdoor concerts, in public areas. These activities not only attract patrons, but also provide a chance for people to explore their downtown.

    #8

    SPRING

    FALL

    SUMMER

    WINTER

    Street festivals, outdoor concerts, and other events held downtown are a great way to create excitement on Main St. and attract customers. These events should be held year-round.

    pu

    blic

  • PRIVATECreate an inviting pedestrian experience. Its not just a nice thing to do; it can help

    INCREASE RETAIL SALES.

    priv

    ate

    #1BE INVITING

    #2SCREENING

    #3PARKING & DRIVEWAYS

    #4SITE

    FURNISHINGS

    #5SIGNAGE

    #6RETAIL DISPLAYS

    #7LANDSCAPING

    #8BUILDINGS

    THE SUBSEQUENT PAGES DESCRIBE EIGHT CONSIDERATIONS WHICH WILL BE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE TOWN OF WALNUT COVE.

  • 25

    D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S

    BE INVITINGKEEP YOUR DOORS OPENOpen your doors. Consider an air curtain that would allow you to keep your door open during cooler months.

    EXTEND your business INTO THE STREETAnything you would put in a window display can be extended into the street. Avoid the garage sale look of clothes racks and cardboard boxes. Positive ways to extend into the street include dressing manikins in merchandise or hanging quilts on railings.

    #1OPEN YOUR DOORS!

    Customers are more likely to enter your business if the door is open.

    Extend your business into the street with dining spaces or retail

    merchandise.

    EXTEND INTO THE STREET

    Avoid the garage sale look.

    PRIV

    ATE

    no clothes racks

  • C H A P T E R T W O

    26

    SCREENINGDumpsters are not focal point materialLocate your dumpster in a hidden area. If this is not possible, screen your dumpster. Utility equipment, HVAC and similar mechanical equipment should be treated in the same manner.

    Screen Parking lots & service areasParking lots and loading docks can be a necessary part of a business, but often times these areas are neglected or unappealing. Screening these areas with walls or landscaping can increase curb appeal for your business and generally improve community character. Just remember:

    INCREASED CURB APPEAL = INCREASED VISITORS = INCREASE SALES.

    #2screen dumpsters

    Screen Parking

    Dumpsters should be hidden or screened.

    Screening walls can be softened with landscaping. In this example, historical photos of the town provide visual interest.

    HVAC systems should be located on the side or rear of buildings

    and be screened.

    Screen HVAC

  • 27

    D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S

    Landscaping buffers separate parking areas from pedestrian areas and help beautify downtown.

    PARKING & DRIVEWAYSdesign for people first!Locate parking areas behind or to the side of the principal building line and buffer the lot from the sidewalk with landscaping and/ or low walls and fences less than 3 1/2 in height. If retrofitting a building with a parking in front, consider this newfound space an asset! Outdoor dining, a plaza, a landscaped streetyard; re all great opportunities to attract pedestrians to your business!

    sharing is caring when it comes to

    driveways on main streetSharing driveways reduces the number of times the sidewalk is interrupted. The longer a continuous sidewalk, the better the pedestrian experience.

    #3

    Shared parking lots reduce the number of curb cuts creating a more walkable downtown. More sidewalks = more people walking = stronger downtown economy.

    share lots & reduce curb cuts

    Parking in front of buildings effects the downtown charm by disrupting the street wall. In addition, parking

    lots located in front of buildings make pedestrians feel uncomfortable and unprotected.

    NO PARKING IN FRONT

    landscape along the street

    PRIV

    ATE

  • C H A P T E R T W O

    28

    SITE FURNISHINGSthe husband benchHusbands, and other shoppers, enjoy having a place to sit while others are shopping inside.

    Caf dining / outside diningAdd tables and chairs outside in front of your business, if possible, even if youre not a restaurant or coffee shop.

    Functional art Everyday furnishings, like benches and bike racks, can be art pieces.

    On-street dining can help create a lively downtown.

    Bike racks assist with beautification efforts.

    Outdoor dining

    functional art

    the husband benchEvery retail shop should include at least one outdoor bench flanked by planters.

    #4

  • 29

    D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S

    SIGNAGEPedestrian scaleSignage must be oriented and sized appropriately for pedestrians.

    small is beautifulSigns do not have to be large and overbearing or cluttered with excess information; they should be fairly simple and keep with the character of high-quality neighboring signs. Internally illuminated signs and electronic message board signs are discouraged.

    Menus and chalk boardsAdd menus and chalk boards to exterior spaces to give pedestrians more information about whats inside your business.

    blade signsBlade signs are hung perpendicular to the building. These types of signs are directed at pedestrians.

    #5blade signs

    menu boards

    Blade signs are oriented towards pedestrians.

    Menu boards can be exhibited outside.

    Chalk boards can be used for menus or daily messages.

    chalk boards

    PRIV

    ATE

  • C H A P T E R T W O

    30

    RETAIL DISPLAYSExtend retail into the streetExtend window displays to exterior spaces. If you display it in your windows, consider displaying it outside, as well.

    What not to do: Avoid the garage-sale look. No exterior merchandising; no cardboard boxes filled with piles of merchandise, nor any clothes racks, should be displayed outside.

    window displaysWindow displays should frequently showcase new items. Keep them current and changing with seasonal decor.

    #6

    Catch window shoppers attention while giving them a glimpse into your store.

    keep it simple

    street appealWindow displays can tastefully extend into the street.

  • 31

    D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S

    LANDSCAPINGLOTS AND LOTS OF PLANTS AND POTSUse a combination of window boxes, planters, and landscape areas. Plants provide interest; they soften the appearance of hard surfaces and provide color, fragrance, and seasonal decor. Larger pots are more eye-catching than smaller ones.

    #7

    hanging baskets

    window boxes

    planters

    PRIV

    ATE

  • C H A P T E R T W O

    32

    BUILDINGS entranceComplement the streetscape and established building presence with welcoming and noticeable entrances. Consider using architectural features, such as transoms and sidelights, changes in roof line, different massing, and/or unique materials.

    orientationOrient principal faades and principal entrances toward the street. Where buildings front on two streets, a single entrance may be located on the corner.

    windows and doorsThe building architecture should create interest through significant glass; approximately 60% of building fronts should incorporate glass.

    ground floor Buildings should be organized so the ground floor has the tallest apparent height with shorter upper stories.

    #8the entrance

    ground floor

    This entrance is easily identifiable and flanked by two planters.

    Using different colors and materials helps to distinguish the ground floor from the upper story.

    Glass in windows and doors lets people see

    what you have for sale and provides a

    welcoming feel to your building.

    GLASS!

  • THIS CHAPTER SERVES AS THE HEART OF THE MAIN STREET REVITALIZATION PLAN.

    This chapter provides recommendations for the plans three core areas: facades; streetscapes; and site specific study areas. These recommendations cast a vision for a future and vibrant Walnut Cove.

    IN THIS CHAPTER Faade Considerations Faades Streetscape Site Study Areas

    recommendations

    3

  • 34

    C H A P T E R T H R E E

    1

    2

    7

    56

    4

    8

    3

    FAADESThe consultant team conducted a thorough photographic inventory of the entire building frontage along Main Street. The purpose was to show how comprehensive faade improvements could enhance the main street business district. The intention is to show care, enduring materials, strong rooflines, a more inviting shopping environment through greater number of windows, and greater consistency among sign bands.

    EXISTING

    #1 faade considerationsTHE FOLLOWING FAADE TREATMENTS ILLUSTRATE GENERAL PATTERNS, RATHER THAN SPECIFIC PRESCRIPTIONS.

  • 35

    R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

    WATER TABLEThe water table provides a clear demarcation of the buildings faade base using materials that contrast with the primary faade material.

    STOREFRONT: THREE PART SYSTEMA. A resilient "water table" band, such as masonry or cementitious panel; B. A clear glazed view/display band; and C. A clear or translucent glazed transom band, or crosspiece above a window.

    SIGNAGEThe signage, if applied to the faade, should act as an architectural "header" over the storefront. If the signage is turned perpendicular to the faade, then it might be located directly above the faade's main entry point.

    AWNING / CANOPYAwnings or canopy roofs may be constructed of light metal roofing materials and supported by light steel or heavy timber framing.

    UPPER LEVELGlazed and blind window treatments should possess a clear articulation of trim around the opening. The trim should be of contrasting color to the material used on the primary faade. If the trim is the same material as the primary faade, then the articulation should provide a sense of depth and shadow.

    CORNICEDevelop a clear and strong cornice line at the top of the faade with integrated brackets.

    STRUCTUREDevelop a clear articulation of implied structural support and rhythm in each unique faade.

    ORNAMENTBlind window openings and other architectural accessories, such as the roundel included in the 1-story building in the sketch at left, provide opportunities for small, unadorned buildings to "punch above their weight" in the overall faade plan for relatively little cost.

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7

    8

    faa

    des

  • 36

    C H A P T E R T H R E E

    #2 faadesLOOKING EAST ALONG MAIN STREETThe intent of the faade treatments is to show:

    care, enduring materials, strong rooflines, a more inviting shopping environment through greater number of windows, and; greater consistency among sign bands.

    3rd4th

    EXISTING

    FAADE CONCEPT

  • 37

    R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

    faa

    des

    2nd

  • 38

    C H A P T E R T H R E E

    #2 faadesLOOKING WEST ALONG MAIN STREETFaade improvement programs are a critical tool for advancing downtown revitalization efforts. Basic and inexpensive faade treatments can drastically improve the downtown image.

    3rd

    EXISTING

    FAADE CONCEPT

    2nd

  • 39

    R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

    TOWN HALLThe concept to the right represents one of the many ways general faade treatments could be applied to this building.

    faa

    des

    4th

    4th

    alley gateway

    2 story building w/ parking behind

    restore theater w/ new store front

  • 40

    C H A P T E R T H R E E

    #3 streetscape_45 degree parking conceptstreetscape PLAN

  • 41

    R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

    streetsca

    pe

  • 42

    C H A P T E R T H R E E

    #3 streetscape_45 degree parking concept

    ROUNDABOUT GATEWAYA roundabout at 1st Street will slow traffic and set the stage for a vibrant Walnut Cove Main Street. Furthermore, roundabouts keep traffic moving steadily while calming speeds.

    45 DEGREE PARKING45 degree parking provides for a significant increase in on-street parking, but could present some safety concerns because drivers will need to back into traffic. Another option, reverse angle parking, would require drivers to back into the angled parking space. Although this requires education, it does allow drivers to safely pull forward when going back into traffic.

    a bstreetscape EXHIBITS

    Angle parking would slow traffic down as vehicles

    back out of spaces.

    This option shows how Main Street could be re-striped to provide angle parking on the west side of the street. Curb extensions, crosswalks, and pedestrian refuge islands create a safer, more walkable downtown. Street trees, pedestrian street lights, banners, and gateways provide an improved aesthetic to the downtown.

  • 43

    R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

    BUMP OUTSBump outs are a critical streetscape component. Located at intersections or mid-block crossings, this feature makes for a more comfortable pedestrian experience.

    BANNERSBanners can be a fun and creative way to beautify the Town of Walnut Cove. In the concept illustrated below, walnut tree leaflets are utilized on each seasonal banner to maintain a common theme.

    C D

    Our Roots Run Deep

    ENJOYSummertimein Our Town

    Our Roots Run DeepOur Roots Run Deep

    ENJOYSummertimein Our Town

    Our Roots Run Deep

    streetsca

    pe

  • 44

    C H A P T E R T H R E E

    #3 streetscape_parallel parking concept

    OLD HOTEL SITE

    streetscape PLAN

  • 45

    R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

    streetsca

    pe

  • 46

    C H A P T E R T H R E E

    #3 streetscape_parallel parking concept

    ALLEYWAY TO PUBLIC PARKINGThe alleyway between the old livery and Walnut Cove Motor Co. currently serves as the only access to the back of house of these buildings. The Town of Walnut Cove could explore a creating a public parking lot behind these buildings and make the alleyway either pedestrian-only or to accommodate vehicles, as well.

    MAIN STREET DINER A decorative sidewalk treatment and pedestrian-scale signage create a safer environment near Main Street Diner.

    a b

    EXISTING EXISTING

    This street design maintains the existing configuration of parallel parking on both sides of Main Street while adding amenities that would significantly improve the downtown as a shopping district. Planted medians are strategically placed to maintain critical left turns. Medians help to calm traffic, improve the aesthetic of the street, and provide a pedestrian refuge island for people crossing Main Street. Curb extensions create a shorter travel distance for pedestrians. Curbs only extend as wide as the parallel parking lanes, thereby not intruding on the travel lanes and turning radii. Mid-block pedestrian crossings make it easier and safer for pedestrian movement. All of these improvements are aimed at keeping traffic flowing while calming it significantly. Study after study suggests that a walkable and inviting downtown is a more successful downtown.

    streetscape EXHIBITS

  • 47

    R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

    A parklet is a sidewalk extension that provides

    more space and amenities for people

    using the street. Parklets are typically installed on parking

    lanes and use several parking spaces.

    Outdoor gathering areas are an important part of a successful Main Street. Consider sacrificing some on-street parking to create significant sidewalk extensions that provide retail and/or outdoor dining space.

    cEXISTING

    OUTDOOR DINING CONCEPT

    EXPANDED RETAIL CONCEPT

    streetsca

    pe

    DUNLAP PARKLET

  • C H A P T E R T H R E E

    48

    #4 SITE STUDY AREAS1. OLD HOTEL SITE

    The Town of Walnut Cove should consider a public-private partnership to develop the old hotel site located at the intersection of 2nd St. and Main St. This partnership would help to ensure that key parcels would be developed in accordance with other downtown revitalization efforts.

    Although the site is small, a mixture of uses can be combined to provide for a dense & active area that supports downtown economic development. This 1/2 acre tract can provide for 11,700 sq. ft. of residential and 4,300 sq. ft. of commercial space.

    vicinity map

    OLD HOTEL

    SITE

    FOWLERPARK

    8

    15

    MAIN

    STRE

    ET

    2ND STREET

    SITE STUDY AREA

    PLAZA WITHOUTDOORDINING

    TOWN HOMETOWN HOMETOWN HOMEMIXED-USE

    MIXED-USEMIXED-USEOPEN BELOW

    1 OLD HOTEL SITESITE PLAN

    PARKING 15 SPACES

  • 49

    R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

    #4 SITE STUDY AREAS

    THIS 1/2 ACRE TRACT CAN PROVIDE FOR 11,700 SQ. FT. OF RESIDENTIAL AND 4,300 SQ. FT. OF COMMERCIAL SPACE.

    PERSPECTIVE

    {

    2ND STREET

    MAIN

    STR

    EET

  • C H A P T E R T H R E E

    50

    #4 SITE STUDY AREAS2.THE COVE @ FOWLER PARK

    Utilizing Fowler Parks unique topography, this site could be re-purposed as an amphitheater where the town could host regular events and concerts. This asset would help foster a greater sense of community and attract consumers to downtown businesses.

    vicinity map

    OLD HOTEL

    SITE

    FOWLERPARK

    SITE PLAN

    (FOWLER PARK) CAN ATTRACT CONSUMERS TO DOWNTOWN BUSINESSES.{

  • 51

    R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

    #4 SITE STUDY AREAS

    STREAM BANK ENHANCEMENT ADVENTURE PLAYGROUND

    STAGE AMPHITHEATER

    SITE FEATURES

  • WITH STRONG LEADERSHIP, PATIENCE, AND PERSEVERANCE, THIS PLAN CAN FUNDAMENTALLY IMPROVE THE ECONOMIC POSITION OF WALNUT COVE.

    This chapter serves a guide for strategically and fiscally realizing the plan recommendations. Because of the cost of improvements, it will be important to implement the plan in phases. Also, there are specific grant opportunities available to the town, but the town must position itself to compete for this limited funding opportunities.

    IN THIS CHAPTER Phasing Plan Implementation Strategies Estimate of Probable Costs Zoning Ordinance Changes

    Implementation

    4

  • 61

    C H A P T E R F O U R

    PHASING PLANstreetscape Phasing

    PHASE 3 PHASE 2 PHASE 1

    PHASE 1 THE NORTHERN GATEWAY (2016-2021)Phase 1 includes the renovation of Fowler Park and streetscape improvements that establish an explicit northern gateway into downtown Walnut Cove. This phase includes improvements for the entire intersection (all four corners) of 5th and Main Street. Fowler Park is included because this project was well-received at the public workshop. The northern gateway serves as an ideal pilot project this project is relatively inexpensive, contains many of the key elements proposed throughout the entire streetscape plan, and will significantly improve the towns character as an independent project.

    PHASE 2THE SOUTHERN GATEWAY (2021-2026)Phase 2 extends from the roundabout at Old Town Road to 2nd and Main Street. This phase includes improvements for the entire intersection (all four corners) of 2nd and Main Street. Similar to the northern gateway, this phase will significantly improve the towns character as an independent project and complete a bookends approach to implementing the overall master plan.

    PHASE 3 THE HEART OF MAIN (2026-2031)With Phase 1 and 2 complete, Phase 3 will link these sections and extend from 2nd to 5th street. The success of previously completed phases should establish public support to realize the entire streetscape plan. If the final phase is not complete, the two gateways will independently serve as significant enhancements to Walnut Coves commercial center.

  • 62

    I M P L E M E N T A T I O N

    Estimate of probable costPhase I : Fowler Park & Northern Gateway to Downtown

    Material Unit Quantity*Cost /

    Unit ($) Total ($)Fowler Park

    Adventure Playground ea 1 42,000.00$ 42,000.00$ Amphitheater ea 1 250,000.00$ 250,000.00$ Design, Engineering & Surveying 75,000.00$ Grading for Amphitheater ea 1 60,000.00$ 60,000.00$ Landscaping ea 1 45,000.00$ 45,000.00$ Monument Sign ea 1 3,500.00$ 3,500.00$ Stairs ea 1 4,500.00$ 4,500.00$ Stream Enhancement ea 1 20,000.00$ 20,000.00$ Subtotal 500,000.00$

    Northern "Gateway" into DowntownPrep Costs: Engineering, Surveying & Permitting 73,000.00$ Mobilization 34,024.59$ Bump Outs (Curb Extenstions) ea. 4 21,000.00$ 84,000.00$ Crosswalks (signalized) ea. 8 7,500.00$ 60,000.00$ Crosswalks (unsignalized) ea. 3 2,500.00$ 7,500.00$ Lighting ea. 8 3,500.00$ 28,000.00$ Maintenance of Traffic ea 1 7,000.00$ 7,000.00$ Mid-Block Refuge Island and Crossing ea. 1 7,500.00$ 7,500.00$ Other Landscaping ea. 11 250.00$ 2,750.00$ Pavement Marking lin. ft. 650 12.00$ 7,800.00$ Planted Median sq. ft. 1820 10.00$ 18,200.00$ Re-striping roadway and parallel parking lin. ft. 2000 12.00$ 24,000.00$ Sidewalk Re-construction sf 6800 8.00$ 54,400.00$ Street Trees ea. 5 300.00$ 1,500.00$ Traffic Signage/Rapid Flash Beacon ea. 1 14,000.00$ 14,000.00$ Wayfinding Signage and Banners ea. 8 650.00$ 5,200.00$ Subtotal 428,874.59$

    Total for Both Areas 928,874.59$ Construction Contractor Overhead & Profit, etc. (18%) 167,197.43$ Contingency (20%) 185,774.92$ Grand Total 1,281,846.93$

    Phase II: Southern Gateway Into Downtown

    Material Unit Quantity*

    Cost /

    Unit ($) Total ($)

    Prep Costs

    Construction Staking 3,500.00$

    Demolition 40,000.00$

    Engineering (Civil, Geotechnical, Electrical), Surveying & Permitting 203,500.00$

    Geotechnical Testing 7,500.00$

    Incidental Grading 25,000.00$

    Mobilization 31,785.00$

    Subtotal 311,285.00$

    Streetscape Elements

    Bump Outs (Curb Extenstions) ea. 8 21,000.00$ 168,000.00$

    Crosswalks (unsignalized) ea. 2 2,500.00$ 5,000.00$

    Lighting ea. 18 3,500.00$ 63,000.00$

    Mid-Block Refuge Island and Crossing ea. 1 7,500.00$ 7,500.00$

    Maintenance of Traffic ea 1 7,000.00$ 5,000.00$

    Other Landscaping ea. 1 25,000.00$ 25,000.00$

    Planted Median sq. ft. 2610 10.00$ 26,100.00$

    Re-striping roadway and parallel parking lin. ft. 300 12.00$ 3,600.00$

    Round-a-bout ea. 1 194,000.00$ 194,000.00$

    Sidewalk Re-construction sf 5408 8.00$ 43,264.00$

    Street Trees ea. 11 450.00$ 4,950.00$

    Traffic Signage/Rapid Flash Beacon ea. 1 14,000.00$ 14,000.00$

    Wayfinding Signage and Banners ea. 19 650.00$ 12,350.00$

    Subtotal Hardscape Elements 571,764.00$

    Subtotal 883,049.00$

    Construction Contractor Overhead & Profit, etc. (18%) 158,948.82$

    Contingency (20%) 176,609.80$

    Grand Total 1,218,607.62$

    Phase II: Southern Gateway Into Downtown

    Material Unit Quantity*

    Cost /

    Unit ($) Total ($)

    Prep Costs

    Construction Staking 3,500.00$

    Demolition 40,000.00$

    Engineering (Civil, Geotechnical, Electrical), Surveying & Permitting 203,500.00$

    Geotechnical Testing 7,500.00$

    Incidental Grading 25,000.00$

    Mobilization 31,785.00$

    Subtotal 311,285.00$

    Streetscape Elements

    Bump Outs (Curb Extenstions) ea. 8 21,000.00$ 168,000.00$

    Crosswalks (unsignalized) ea. 2 2,500.00$ 5,000.00$

    Lighting ea. 18 3,500.00$ 63,000.00$

    Mid-Block Refuge Island and Crossing ea. 1 7,500.00$ 7,500.00$

    Maintenance of Traffic ea 1 7,000.00$ 5,000.00$

    Other Landscaping ea. 1 25,000.00$ 25,000.00$

    Planted Median sq. ft. 2610 10.00$ 26,100.00$

    Re-striping roadway and parallel parking lin. ft. 300 12.00$ 3,600.00$

    Round-a-bout ea. 1 194,000.00$ 194,000.00$

    Sidewalk Re-construction sf 5408 8.00$ 43,264.00$

    Street Trees ea. 11 450.00$ 4,950.00$

    Traffic Signage/Rapid Flash Beacon ea. 1 14,000.00$ 14,000.00$

    Wayfinding Signage and Banners ea. 19 650.00$ 12,350.00$

    Subtotal Hardscape Elements 571,764.00$

    Subtotal 883,049.00$

    Construction Contractor Overhead & Profit, etc. (18%) 158,948.82$

    Contingency (20%) 176,609.80$

    Grand Total 1,218,607.62$

    Phase III: Streetscape & Off Street Parking 2nd-5th Streets

    Material Unit Quantity*

    Cost /

    Unit ($) Total ($)

    Prep Costs

    Construction Staking 3,500.00$ Demolition 60,000.00$ Engineering (Civil, Geotechnical, Electrical), Surveying & Permitting 301,621.00$ Geotechnical Testing 7,500.00$ Incidental Grading 25,000.00$ Maintenance of Traffic 7,500.00$ Mobilization 53,817.00$

    Subtotal 458,938.00$

    Streetscape Elements

    Bump Outs (Curb Extenstions) ea. 8 21,000.00$ 168,000.00$ Crosswalks (signalized) ea. 4 7,500.00$ 30,000.00$ Crosswalks (unsignalized) ea. 4 2,500.00$ 10,000.00$ Lighting ea. 38 3,500.00$ 133,000.00$ Maintenance of Traffic ea 1 7,000.00$ 7,000.00$ Mid-Block Refuge Island and Crossing ea. 2 7,500.00$ 15,000.00$ New Community Parking Lots ea. 2 50,000.00$ 100,000.00$ Other Landscaping ea. 1 35,000.00$ 35,000.00$ Pavement Marking (in lieu of sidewalk) lin. ft. 650 12.00$ 7,800.00$ Planted Median sq. ft. 2960 10.00$ 29,600.00$ Resetting Street Signs ea. 1 12,000.00$ 12,000.00$ Re-striping roadway and parallel parking lin. ft. 1381 12.00$ 16,572.00$ Sidewalk Re-construction sf 22096 8.00$ 176,768.00$ Stormwater Infrastructure ea. 1 150,000.00$ 150,000.00$ Street Trees ea. 30 450.00$ 13,500.00$ Traffic Light on Decorative Pole & Mast Arm ea. 4 25,000.00$ 100,000.00$ Traffic Signage/Rapid Flash Beacon ea. 2 14,000.00$ 28,000.00$ Wayfinding Signage and Banners ea. 38 650.00$ 24,700.00$

    Subtotal Hardscape Elements 1,056,940.00$

    Subtotal 1,515,878.00$ Construction Contractor Overhead & Profit, etc. (18%) 272,858.04$ Contingency (20%) 303,175.60$ Grand Total 2,091,911.64$

    PHASE 1: FOWLER PARK & NORTHERN GATEWAY PHASE 2: SOUTHERN GATEWAY INTO DOWNTOWN PHASE 3: STREETSCAPE & OFF STREET PARKING

  • 63

    C H A P T E R F O U R

    OLD HOTEL SITEThe Town of Walnut Cove currently owns and controls the Old Hotel Site. The town must be patient as it considers when and how it releases this property to a private developer. This property has the potential to serve as the downtowns newest private development and become a catalyst for spawning additional new development. The conceptual plan for Old Hotel Site presents a mixed-use (commercial and residential) concept for this site, but the town should remain open to all types of development would adhere to the recommended building form provided within this plan. The town should consider utilizing NCs Public-Private Partnership (P3) legislation that allows the town to shop for potential developers. The town should be willing to provide incentives to the right developer that might include a significant, if not complete, reduction in land costs and improved surrounding public streetscapes.

    FOWLER PARKThe concept plan for a renovated Fowler Park was well-received at the public workshop. Should elected officials wish to pursue development of this facility, there should be consideration to apply to the NC Parks and Recreation Trust Fund (PARTF) for grant support. PARTF is currently recommending projects up to $250,000 and applicants must provide a 50% cash match for the total project cost. PARTF accepts applications in May of each year. In addition, this grant fund is highly competitive and projects are primarily selected through a point system. To ensure competitiveness, the town should consider the following before submitting a PARTF application:

    implementation strategiessite study areas

    1. Develop a Site Specific Master Plan for Fowler Park. This element is worth 10/115 points. See PARTF plan requirements within Appendix. Furthermore, this plan will need to make strategic recommendations, such as providing a certain number of new facilities, in order to maximize other points within the PARTF application.

    2. Adopt a 3-5 year capital improvement plan for parks and recreation. This element is worth 3/115 points and will demonstrate the towns committed cash grant match. PARTF projects can be developed over a three year period.

    3. Conduct public meetings in accordance with the grant requirement. This requirement demon-strates public knowledge and input within the project development process. This element is worth 5/115 points.

    4. Ensure that the countys existing recre-ation survey (completed in 2009) will be accepted by PARTF. This element is worth 5/115 points. The survey complet-ed by Stokes County in 2009 should be accepted by PARTF although this survey did not reference Fowler Park explicitly.

    5. Receive a formal endorsement from at least two local community groups. This item is worth 3/115 points and can include civic groups, neighborhood associations, advisory boards, etc.

    6. Create a Parks and Recreation Board. An endorsement from this board or a similar board is worth 2/115 points.

  • 64

    I M P L E M E N T A T I O N

    INTENT1. Promote the sustainable development of

    Walnut Coves Main Street corridor.

    2. Preserve and protect the public health, safety and welfare of the citizens and work-ers of the city.

    3. Promote efficient utilization of land for business, housing, and multi-use develop-ment along Main Street.

    4. Improve the function and appearance of Main Street, and enhance the convenience, ease and enjoyment of walking, shopping, and public gathering.

    5. Clearly define and activate the public realm by locating buildings to form street edges and corners, and locating entrances and windows to activate the street level.

    6. Define building forms to be compatible with their context.

    7. Provide appropriate buffers between in-compatible uses and site elements.

    8. Establish flexible parking standards that respond to zone lot sizes, the pedestrian oriented nature of Main Street, and support the adaptive reuse of historic resources and buildings that meet Main Street forms.

    USESThe towns B-1 zoning district shall encourages a strong mix of housing, office and commercial uses with flexible use requirements.

    PARKING1. Standard parking requirement

    One (1) parking space per five hundred (1:500) square feet of nonresidential uses.

    One (1) parking space per unit of market rate housing.

    One (1) parking space per four (4) units for: senior housing; housing that is affordable for persons with forty percent (40%) area median income and below; units under five hundred and fifty (550) square feet; single room occupancy housing; boarding or rooming homes; and other special needs housing.

    2. Exceptions provided for small lots, adaptive reuse of historic structures and buildings that meet the form standards built prior to the existing parking code.

    3. Allows parking requirements to be met off-site or as provided by an operational park-ing plan.

    BUILDING PLACEMENT Main Street structures

    must be built to within 1 6 of the zone lot line

    75% of Main Street front-age must be occupied by a building

    25% of Side Street front-age must be occupied by a building; 40% of the Side Street front-

    age shall be encouraged to be occupied by a building

    SETBACK FROM RESIDENTIAL ZONES Five (5) foot setback

    required between Main Street and residentially zoned lots

    LOCATION AND SCREENING OF PARKING AND DRIVE AISLES

    Parking lots and drive aisles must be screened by a 36-48 solid screening device such as a masonry wall or solid evergreen hedge

    A five (5) foot wide landscape buffer area with a six (6) foot tall solid screen-ing wall (such as a privacy fence) required between a Main Street lot and a resi-dentially zoned lot (this buffer area may double as the required setback)

    HEIGHT & UPPER STORY SETBACKS Main Street Example #1

    Maximum height: 38 (approximately 3 stories)

    Minimum height: 12 -- two-stories

    No upper story setback required

    Main Street Example #2 Maximum height: 52

    (approximately 4 stories) Minimum height: 24 Upper story setback: maximum building

    height must be setback 25 from a zone lot line adjacent to a residentially zoned lot with no structure in excess of 38 (within this setback the maximum building height is 38)

    ZONE OF TRANSPARENCY 60% of the area between

    3.5 and 8.5 above grade must contain windows on the Main Street

    25% of the area between 3.5 and 8.5 above grade must contain windows on the Side Street

    RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURE EXCEPTIONS Two options exist for

    structures used solely for residential occupancy

    Option A: The zone of transparency rests between 4 and 10 above grade, 40% of this area must be glazed on the Main Street and 25% on the Side Street

    Option B: the structure may be setback between 5-10 from the property line and the area of the setback must be enclosed by a screening device (certain architectural features or elements may protrude into this setback such as balconies)

    The exceptions allow the residential struc-tures to have a sense of privacy yet main-tain a strong relationship between the building and the activity at street level.

    ENTRANCES Primary entrances are

    required to face Main Streets

    A primary street facing entrance may be angled on the corner or the may be setback no more than 10 from the Main Street property

    zoning ordinance recommendations

    Parking capacity of small parcels

    Typical parking modules land area requirements

  • IN THIS CHAPTER PARTF Plan Requirements Public Private Partnerships

    Appendix

  • A P P E N D I X

    Site analysis - Describe and evaluate the sites natural, historic, and man-made features. These include items such as topography, soils, vegetation, hydrology, significant natural communities, wetlands, existing structures, and public access.

    Recreational needs - Identify the recreational opportunities that the public prefers using meetings or a survey. Describe how the recreational opportunities being proposed by the master plan relate to existing recreational facilities and services in the jurisdiction (this may be a part of the system-wide comprehensive plan).

    Program description - Identify the main purposes of the park including a description of the how the local government will design the park to be used by the public.

    Physical needs - Identify the physical needs of the parks site. Include any land the local government will acquire and any capital improvements (buildings, recreation facilities, roads, utilities). All land and capital improvements proposed in the PARTF application must be included in the master plan.

    Project costs - Include project cost for property acquisition and capital improvements, divided into phases if necessary. The cost information can be provided in a separate document that is submitted with the master plan.

    Site Plans - Site plans and illustrations depicting the boundaries of land to be acquired and the location of facilities.

    Public Involvement - Describe how the local government involved a broad range of the citizens in its jurisdiction as the master plan was being developed. Examples include public meetings or advisory committee meetings. This description can also be provided in a separate document that is submitted with the master plan.

    PARKS AND RECREATION TRUST FUND Requirements for a Site Specific Master Plan for the Park

    S i t e S p e c i f i c M a s t e r P l a n f o r t h e P a r k : A l o n g- r a n g e p l a n f o r o n e p a r k t h a t c o n t a i n s a s i t e a n a ly s i s ; a d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e c o m m u n i t y s r e c r e a t i o n a l n e e d s ; p r o p e r t y a c q u i s i t i o n b o u n d a r i e s ; a n d t h e p r o p o s e d l o c a t i o n o f a l l c a p i t a l i m p r o v e m e n t s .

    A m a s t e r p l a n d o c u m e n t m u s t a d e q u a t e ly a d d r e s s a l l o f t h e f o l l o w i n g i t e m s :

    partf

  • A P P E N D I X

    p-3

    Public-Private Partnerships

    O t h e r K e y E l e m e n t s o f P - 3

    One single contract with owner/developer Shared costs and responsibilities Flexible contracting authority for construction,

    financing, and operation of public-private project

    Developer selected based on qualifications Developer must finance at least 50% of project cost Development agreement establishes roles and

    responsibilities of unit and developer

    Local Government Commission (LGC) must approve capital or operating lease

    p - 3 d e v e l o p m e n t a g r e e m e n t r e q u i r e m e n t s

    MUST INCLUDE:

    Property interests of unit and developer Development responsibilities of unit and developer Financing obligations of unit and developer

    (developer responsible for at least 50% of cost)

    HUB good faith efforts responsibilities

    MAY REQUIRE DEVELOPER TO:

    Construct (or reconstruct) some or all of the project Construct additions to the projects Perform renovations to some or all of the project Purchase some or all of the equipment or materials

    for the project (both initial and subsequent)

    Ensure HUB compliance

    c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f a p u b l i c- p r i v a t e p a r t n e r s h i p 1 ) A C a p i t a l i m p r o v e m e n t p r o j e c t 2 ) B e n e f i t s b o t h a g o v e r n m e n t a l e n t i t y a n d a p r i v a t e d e v e l o p e r 3 ) C o n t r a c t e d t h r o u g h a d e v e l o p m e n t a g r e e m e n t 4 ) I n v o l v e s c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a p u b l i c f a c i l i t y o r o t h e r i m p r o v e m e n t s i n c l u d i n g : a . P a v i n g a n d gr a d i n g b . U t i l i t i es c . I n f r a st r u ct u r e d . R e c o n st r u ct i o n or r e p a i r e . M a y i n c lu d e b ot h p u b l i c a n d p r i v at e f a c i l i t i es

    For complete information about Public-Private Partnerships: NCGS 143.128.1C

  • OUR ROOTS RUN DEEP

    Cover and TOC FINAL(small)introduction_FINAL(small)Framework Plan_FINAL(small)design guidelines_FINAL(small)Recommendations_FINAL(small)Implementation_FINAL(small)Appendix_FINAL(small)

Recommended

View more >