Logistics, Checklists, and Resources for Digital Storytelling Facilitators

  • Published on
    31-Dec-2016

  • View
    212

  • Download
    0

Transcript

  • Logistics, Checklists, and Resources for Digital Storytelling Facilitators

  • Guide 4 Logistics, Checklists, and Resources for Digital Storytelling Facilitators

    Images courtesy of: Manitoba Provincial Archives

    These guides are produced as a part of a grant awarded to the Oral History Centre at the University of Winnipeg by the Aboriginal Healing Foundation. The Foundations mandate is to provide resources to address the unresolved trauma experienced by residential school Survivors, their families and communities. The Foundation helps Survivors and their families to speak about their experiences on the legacy of residential schools and to be heard. Digital storytelling encourages understanding about the residential school legacy and contributes to healing for Survivors, their families and communities.

    nindibaajimomin

    Creating and Sharing Digital Stories on the Legacy of Residential Schools

    Guides to Support Healing Across the Generations | 2014

    Avaailable online at: www.nindibaajimomin.com

    Oral HistOry Centre Bryce Hall University of Winnipeg 515 Portage Avenue Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

    Telephone 204.786.9382 E-mail oralhistorycentre@gmail.com Website www.uwinnipeg.ca/index/oral-history-centre

  • Guide 4: Logistics, Checklists, and Resources for Digital Storytelling Facilitators

    Project Work Plan .....................................................................2

    Project Budget .............................................................................5

    Invitation to Participate ........................................................ 6

    Workshop Overview ................................................................ 7

    Workshop Agenda ....................................................................9

    Learning Circle Discussion Guide .................................. 10

    Storyboard Worksheet .......................................................... 11

    Participant Consent Form ...................................................12

    Photographed/Video-Recorded Image Permission Form ........................................................ 13

    Digital Story Release Form ................................................ 14

    Venue Planning Checklist ..................................................15

    Workshop Equipment and Supplies Checklist ....... 16

    Workshop Food and Beverage Checklist .................... 17

    Honoraria Receipt .................................................................. 18

    Certificate of Completion .................................................. 19

    Public Launch/Screening Checklist .............................20

    Digital Storytelling Community Launch Budget ....21

    Participant Care Checklist ................................................. 22

    Facilitator and Support Care Checklist ....................... 23

    Digital Storytelling Scripts .................................................24

    Resources and References ..................................................30

    Table of ContentsOverall Table of Contents

    Guide 1: Introduction And Overview Of Digital Storytelling Guides On The Legacy Of Residential SchoolsAcknowledgementsIntroductionWhat is Digital Storytelling?Limitations and Advantages of Digital StorytellingDigital Storytelling and Intergenerational ReconciliationOverview of Guides

    Guide 2: Planning And Preparing A Digital Storytelling Project On The Legacy Of Residential SchoolsPlanning the Digital Storytelling ProjectBenefits for ParticipantsTime CommitmentAn Indigenous ApproachEmotional and Cultural SupportsConfidentiality and AnonymityConsentRights of the ParticipantsBudgetRecruitmentFacilitating a Learning Circle

    Guide 3: Creating And Sharing Digital Stories On The Legacy Of Residential SchoolsFinding the StoryRecording the StoryImporting Images and SoundDigital Editing SoftwareEditing the Digital StorySharing the Digital Story

    Guide 4: Logistics, Checklists, and Resources for Digital Storytelling FacilitatorsProject Work Plan Project BudgetInvitation to ParticipateWorkshop OverviewWorkshop AgendaLearning Circle Discussion GuideStoryboard WorksheetParticipant Consent FormPhotographed/Video-Recorded Image Permission FormDigital Story Release FormVenue Planning ChecklistWorkshop Equipment and Supplies ChecklistWorkshop Food and Beverage ChecklistHonoraria ReceiptCertificate of CompletionPublic Launch/Screening ChecklistDigital Storytelling Community Launch BudgetParticipant Care ChecklistFacilitator and Support Care ChecklistDigital Storytelling ScriptsResources and References

    Guide 5: Overview of Digital Storytelling Tools and Techniques

  • 1intrOduCtiOn

    This guide includes organizational pieces for facilitators or organizers of digital story projects to use and/or modify.

    Editable versions of these can be found as part of the toolkit. As part of the development of a

    digital story, communities may choose to stay very grassroots in gathering participants or chose to seek outside funding opportunities. Whatever the case may be, included in this section of the guide are a number of extra checklists to help plan and execute a digital storytelling group project.

    the sample checklist templates included:

    01. Project Work Plan

    02. Project Budget

    03. Invitation to Participate

    04. Workshop Overview

    05. Workshop Agenda

    06. Learning Circle Discussion Guide

    07. Storyboard Worksheet

    08. Participant Consent Form

    09. Photographed/Video-Recorded Image Permission Form

    10. Digital Story Release Form

    11. Venue Planning Checklist

    12. Workshop Equipment and Supplies Checklist

    13. Workshop Food and Beverage Checklist

    14. Honoraria Receipt

    15. Certificate of Completion Template

    16. Public Launch/Screening Checklist

    17. Digital Storytelling Community Launch Budget

    18. Participant Care Checklist

    19. Facilitator and Support Care Checklist

    20. Digital Storytelling Scripts

    21. Resources and References

  • 2 34. Create the project budget. Using the draft work plan as a reference, make a list of all expenses associated with each phase and workshop session of the project, including costs for contract fees and honoraria, gift giving and other cultural protocols, travel and accommodations, venue and meeting space, technical equipment and supplies, and food and catering. Determine whether any space or equipment (i.e., image scanner, photocopier, printer, audio recording devices, image projector) may be borrowed or donated, as in-kind support.

    5. Develop the project tools. With a clear outline of the focus, goals and objectives of the project, and a tentative idea of the project timeline and schedule of activities, prepare all of the documents that will be required to do the project, including relevant checklists, the call for participants, workshop agendas and facilitation notes, the consent form and various release forms, and the honorarium receipt. Any hand-outs that will be required for the different workshop sessions of the project may also be gathered and prepared.

    6. Apply for project funding. With a project budget and work plan in place and potential sources of financial and in-kind support identified, it may be necessary to apply for grant funding to support the project. The request for funding should clearly outline the project plan, the amount of funding required to successfully complete the project, and why it is important to do the project.

    Preparing for the Project

    1. Gather required equipment and supplies. As soon as adequate funding to support the project is received, the equipment and supplies required to conduct the project should be gathered or purchased. Arrangements to collect any in-kind support also should be made.

    2. Make detailed project arrangements. All of the details related to carrying out the project should be coordinated early. A safe, comfortable and accessible community location to host the project workshops, preferably with adequate breakout space for participants to refresh, needs to be arranged. If a recording studio or computer lab will be used for the project, these venues also need to be reserved. Guest presenters, health support workers and digital technicians need to be booked. Given that each workshop session will include lunch and snacks for participants, catering services need to be coordinated, and plans for picking up the food, beverages and other shopping items need to be made. Similarly, special arrangements need to be made if any of the workshop sessions include plans for an Aboriginal Elders or other spiritual leaders.

    3. Distribute the call for participants. If the participant group is not already identified, an invitation to participate in the project will need to be distributed to key contacts throughout the community. Follow-up with these informants may be required to ensure the calls for participants are communicated and shared, as intended.

    1. PrOjeCt WOrk Plan temPlate

    Name of Project Facilitator

    Title of Project

    Project Location

    Project Start and End Dates

    Planning the Project

    1. Consult with the Aboriginal community and solicit potential project partnerships. The Aboriginal community in which the digital storytelling project will be conducted should be informed about the planned digital storytelling project at the start of project planning, to solicit guidance and feedback on the project, to promote interest in the project, and to identify potential project partnerships. The importance of doing the project should be emphasized. The community consultations may also present an opportunity to solicit financial or in-kind support for the project.

    2. Define the specific focus, goals and objectives, and participant profile for the project. What are the reasons for doing the digital storytelling project? What will be accomplished as a result of the project? Why is the project important to do? Who will be the digital storytellers involved in the project? What types of messages are anticipated from the project participants? Who will be the target audience to hear these messages? Will the participant group

    include children of survivors or residential school survivors? Will the project involve women or men? With which Aboriginal group will participants identify? Will participants belong to any other social group? Will persons under the age of 18 years be permitted to participate in the project? What protective measures need to be established for involving under age participants in the project? How many participants will be included in the participant group?

    3. Develop the project work plan. Write down all of the steps required to complete the project and how much time and resources it will take to do each of the activities listed below. Be sure to include room for flexibility in the project timeline, to accommodate the particular needs of project participants and any unforeseen circumstances that may arise during the course of the project. The work plan should include preliminary options for sharing the digital stories upon completion of the project. The project work plan will need to be revised, as the project planning and activities progress.

  • 4 5

    Budget Item Details Total Funds Required

    ReceivedFunds or In Kind Source

    Contract Fees and Honoraria

    Technical support

    Health support worker

    Elder/spiritual healer

    Presenter/guest speaker

    Participants

    Travel and Accommodations

    Mileage/bus tickets

    Meal per diems

    Hotel accommodations

    Venue and Meeting Space

    Meeting room rental

    Recording studio

    Tables and chairs

    Photocopying and printing

    Technical Equipment and Supplies

    Computers

    Program software

    Audio recording equipment

    LCD projector and screen

    Image scanner

    Digital camera

    Data storage devices, batteries

    Project Supplies

    Tobacco for offerings

    Kleenex tissues

    Writing supplies, tape, etc.

    Food and Beverages

    Snacks and beverages

    Coffee supplies/condiments

    Catering

    Total Project Budget

    2. PrOjeCt Budget temPlate

    Title of Project

    Project Start and End Dates

    Project Location

    Name of Project Facilitator

    4. Confirm the participant group. Interested individuals who fit the participant profile need to be contacted and informed about the specifics of the project. Any questions or concerns expressed by potential participants about the project should be addressed. Individuals with continued interest in the project should be invited to participate in the group project. An honorarium should be arranged and provided to participants at the end of each workshop session during the project.

    Conducting the Project

    1. Facilitate learning circle workshop(s). The project facilitator should begin the project activities by facilitating workshops involving learning circles and presentations that are designed to get participants started on finding and creating the digital story that they want to tell. The initial learning circle should be guided by a series of open-ended questions to keep the dialogue focused. A presentation illustrating the elements of digital storytelling and a demonstration on how to create a storyboard should be incorporated into these workshops. Between workshops, participants should be encouraged to collect all of the images, music and sound effects that they want to use to illustrate their personal narratives. By the end of these workshops, participants should have their personal narratives, and their storyboards, finalized and ready for recording and digital editing.

    2. Facilitate a series of workshops on digital editing. The project facilitator should guide participants through the process of creating a digital story, using digital editing software. The workshop sessions will include various tutorials around using digital editing software, including working with images and adding music, transitions and titles to the digital stories. The digital storytelling technical workbook will be used the guide the project facilitator through these workshops.

    Concluding the Project

    1. Organize a public screening event. Once their digital stories are finished, participants may decide whether they want to screen their videos publicly, or keep them private. A public screening event in the community should be coordinated for participants who want to present their videos, as a group. Participants will be required to sign a release form, if they choose to publicly share their videos.

    2. Arrange a celebration feast. A celebration feast to honour the digital storytellers and bring the project to a close should be arranged soon after the launch of the digital stories. Family and close friends of the participants may be invited to share in the celebration. A small gift may be presented to the digital storytellers in appreciation for their participation in the project and to commemorate their storytelling journeys.

  • 6 74. WOrksHOP OvervieW temPlate

    Activity Breakdown

    The course will take place at

    Each day will include an opening and closing prayer and will end with a debriefing. Professional health supports will be made accessible to those who participate in case they need to access them at any point during the week.

    Day 1 am Learning Circle

    Following the opening prayer and introductions, the facilitators will outline the project and obtain relevant consents. Next the participants will be led through a facilitated discussion on the effects of residential school. The discussion will be guided by a series of open-ended questions, outlined in a guide given to them beforehand.

    Day 1 pm Story Circle

    An experienced Aboriginal storyteller or filmmaker will discuss the elements of storytelling. After this, the group members will form a story circle to share and listen to each others stories, provide feedback and support to each other. They will be encouraged to write or orally record their stories and begin to develop them into scripts of the narratives they would most like to tell as homework on the first night.

    Prior to the course, participants will be given questions that will act as a springboard for the learning circle. They will be encouraged to think of stories they might like to tell and they will be encouraged to bring in photos, mementos, songs, handiwork and artwork.

    Day 2 am Story Circle II

    Participants will write down or orally record their stories and then participate in a second story circle. They will work with facilitators and other participants to develop the exact words they wish to use in their stories. Facilitators will provide a short workshop on storyboarding. With collected images they will begin to develop storyboarding ideas.

    Day 2 pm Finalizing and Recording the Stories

    Facilitators will provide an image preparation tutorial. Participants will finalize and record their scripts and begin image preparation: create a storyboard, scan images into a computer and/or have video recorded.

    Name of Project Facilitator Project Facilitator Contact Information

    3. invitatiOn tO PartiCiPate temPlate

    Host Organization for the Project

    Title of Project

    Project Location

    Project Start and End Dates

    The Host Organization for the Project, in collaboration with the Project Partners, and with funding from the Funding Organization, is looking for Aboriginal peoples, to participate in the Project Title.

    The purpose of the project is:

    To generate knowledge about the legacy and intergenerational effects of residential schools.

    To provide a safe, comfortable forum for children of residential school survivors to talk about their experiences of residential schools.

    To give children of survivors an opportunity to express their thoughts and ideas about the intergenerational effects of residential school experiences, through digital storytelling.

    To support healing across generations and promote intergenerational reconciliation.

    Over the course of five days throughout the month(s), participants will:

    Participate in (x amount) of learning circles by sharing their thoughts on the intergenerational experiences of residential schools and intergenerational reconciliation.

    Learn to use video and audio equipment and digital editing software for the purpose of creating a digital story.

    Develop a digital story based on their intergenerational experiences of residential schools and decide whether to share their digital story publicly, or keep it private.

    Receive an honorarium in appreciation of their time commitment to the project and to help offset any costs that that they incur to participant in the project.

    All participants must identify as: First Nations, Mtis or Inuit. Being at least 18 years of age

    (permission to participate may be granted with signed permission from parent/guardian).

    Having a mother or father who attended one or more residential school.

    Being willing to attend all workshop sessions during the project and talk about the intergenerational experiences of residential schools and intergenerational reconciliation.

    To learn more about the digital storytelling project or about participating in the project, please contact the project facilitator:

  • 8 9

    8:30 am Continental Breakfast

    9:00 am Welcome, Introduce Elder/Spiritual Healer Project Facilitator

    9:05 am Opening Prayer Elder/Spiritual Healer

    9:10 am Roundtable Introductions Project Facilitator, Participants, Support Workers

    9:20 am Overview of the Day, Housekeeping Items Project Facilitator

    9:25 am Overview of the Digital Storytelling Project, Signing of Consent Forms and Release Forms Project Facilitator

    9:45 amLearning Circle The Legacy and Intergenerational Experiences of Residential Schools and Intergenerational Reconciliation

    Project Facilitator, Participants

    12:00 pm Lunch Break

    1:00 pm Introduction to Digital Storytelling, Screening of Digital Stories from Toolkit Project Facilitator

    2:15 pm Refreshment Break

    2:30 pm Finding the Story Project Facilitator, Participants

    3:50 pm Next Steps Project Facilitator

    3:55 pm Closing Prayer Elder/Spiritual Healer

    4:00 pm Workshop Adjourned

    5. WOrksHOP agenda temPlate

    Title of Project

    Place of Workshop

    Date of Workshop

    Workshop Start and End Times

    Day 3 am Catch up (finalizing and recording the Stories)

    Day 3 pm Working With Images

    Facilitators will present a tutorial on working with images using Photoshop. Participants will scan images into a computer, have video recorded and begin to work with the images using Photoshop.

    Day 4 Digital Editing

    Facilitators will give a hands-on tutorial about how to use the digital editing software. Then participants will continue working with their images and begin the rough edits of their digital stories on the computers.

    Digital Editing

    Facilitators will give a hands-on tutorial about music, transitions and titles. Participants will continue the digital editing of their stories, adding music, transitions and titles.

    Follow up: Catch-up Digital Editing

    Participants will be invited to come to the editing lab to complete the edits to their digital stories.

    Day 5: Story Screening and Celebration

    Participants will screen their videos for each other, celebrate and honour their stories. A feast will be held in their honour.

    Knowledge Translation

    Participants will return to their communities and institutes and share their videos with students, colleagues and communities, or other audiences. They will share their knowledge on the intergenerational effects of residential schooling, digital storytelling and, if they chose, provide opportunities for others to participate in similar projects.

  • 10 117. stOryBOard WOrksHeet temPlate

    Name of Digital Storyteller

    Title of Digital Story

    Title of Project

    Frame # Naration Photo/Image Music/Sound Effect

    6. learning CirCle disCussiOn guide

    Title of Project

    Project Start and End Dates

    Project Location

    Name of Project Facilitator

    Project Purpose

    To generate knowledge about the legacy and intergenerational effects of residential schools.

    To provide a safe, comfortable forum for children of residential school survivors to talk about their experiences of residential schools.

    To give children of survivors an opportunity to express their thoughts and ideas about the intergenerational effects of residential school experiences, through digital storytelling.

    To support healing across generations and promote intergenerational reconciliation.

    Plan to spend approximately 30 minutes on each question

    1. Explain what it was like to be parented by a survivor of the Indian Residential School system.

    2. Describe some of the behaviours your parent(s) used to cope with residential school experiences.

    3. What behaviours did you use to cope, in childhood and in adulthood?

    4. Describe how you have parented, or plan to parent, your own children.

    5. From where did you learn resilience and develop your determination to succeed?

    6. What does intergenerational reconciliation look like to you?

  • 12 13

    Signature of Digital Storyteller

    Date

    Signature of Image Provider

    Date

    9. PHOtOgraPHed/videO-reCOrded image PermissiOn FOrm

    Name of Digital Storyteller

    Title of Digital Story

    Title of Project

    Project Location

    Name of Image Provider

    Project Purpose

    To generate knowledge about the legacy and intergenerational effects of residential schools.

    To provide a safe, comfortable forum for children of residential school survivors to talk about their experiences of residential schools.

    To give children of survivors an opportunity to express their thoughts and ideas about the intergenerational effects of residential school experiences, through digital storytelling.

    To support healing across generations and promote intergenerational reconciliation.

    As an image provider for the digital story described above:

    I understand the purpose of the digital storytelling project.

    I knowingly and voluntarily agree and consent to be photographed or video-recorded and to have my image used in the above-titled digital story.

    I DO / DO NOT want my name to appear in relation to any publication of my photographed or video-recorded image.

    I have received a copy of this permission form.

    I understand that my photographed or video-recorded image may be published, and I knowingly and voluntarily agree and consent to my image being used in the following ways (initial either yes or no for each use):

    Yes No Use of Photographed or Video-Recorded Image Exceptions/CommentsIn a summary report for project reporting purposes.

    On any website, television broadcast or radio station.

    At any public presentation and knowledge exchange event.

    In any newsletter, news report, journal article and other visual, audio or written publication.

    For any education and teaching purpose.

    Other:

    8. PartiCiPant COnsent FOrm

    Name of Digital Storyteller

    Title of Digital Story

    Title of Project

    Project Location

    Name of Image Provider

    Project Purpose

    To generate knowledge about the legacy and intergenerational effects of residential schools.

    To provide a safe, comfortable forum for children of residential school survivors to talk about their experiences of residential schools.

    As a participant in the digital storytelling project described above, I understand and knowingly and voluntarily agree that:

    My time commitment to the project is critical because of the sensitive topics of discussion and the progressive learning involved with the project.

    I will participate in two 3-hour learning circles by sharing my thoughts on the intergenerational experiences of residential schools and intergenerational reconciliation.

    I will learn to use video and audio equipment and digital editing software for the purpose of creating a digital story.

    I will develop a digital story based on my intergenerational experiences of residential schools. The digital story that I create will be mine to keep. I will decide whether to share my digital story publicly, or keep it private.

    Some of the stories shared in the project may trigger memories of painful experiences that might be upsetting. A health support worker will be on hand during the project, to speak to me about my distressing feelings. A list of potential counselling resources will be provided to me, on request.

    To give children of survivors an opportunity to express their thoughts and ideas about the intergenerational effects of residential school experiences, through digital storytelling.

    To support healing across generations and promote intergenerational reconciliation.

    I will maintain the confidentiality of other project participants. I will not discuss any personal matters shared by other project participants.

    I will allow the project facilitator to write a summary report that may be shared with project funders and others who may be interested in learning about the digital storytelling project.

    My participation in the project is voluntary. I may withdraw my agreement to participate in the project at any time, for any reason, without penalty of any kind.

    I will receive an honorarium in appreciation of my time commitment to the project and to help offset any costs that I incurred to participant in the project. Even if I choose to withdraw my agreement to participate, I will receive an honorarium for all of the workshop sessions that I attend.

    I have received a copy of this consent form.

    Signature of Project Facilitator

    Date

    Signature of Participant

    Date

  • 14 1511. venue Planning CHeCklist

    On public transportation route

    Parking available

    Wheelchair accessible/elevator available

    Smudge friendly

    Main meeting/workshop room undisturbed all day

    Soundproof walls/room dividers

    Sufficient number and arrangement of tables and chairs

    Sufficient breakout space

    Able to darken room for screening

    Sufficient sound and acoustics for audio-recording

    Equipment provisions (LCD projector and screen, laptop, flipchart paper, power cords, etc.)

    Equipment/technical support available

    Photocopy and printing services

    Catering

    Hotel accommodations

    On-site security

    Payment requirements

    Safe for all participants

    10. digital stOry release FOrm

    Name of Digital Storyteller

    Title of Digital Story

    Title of Project

    Project Location

    Name of Project Facilitator

    Project Purpose

    To generate knowledge about the legacy and intergenerational effects of residential schools.

    To provide a safe, comfortable forum for children of residential school survivors to talk about their experiences of residential schools.

    To give children of survivors an opportunity to express their thoughts and ideas about the intergenerational effects of residential school experiences, through digital storytelling.

    To support healing across generations and promote intergenerational reconciliation.

    As a participant in the digital storytelling project described above:

    I understand the purpose of the digital storytelling project.

    I knowingly and voluntarily agree and consent to publicly screening my above-titled digital story, distributing the written script of my digital story, or displaying images from my digital story in the following ways (initial either yes or no for each use):

    I DO / DO NOT want my name to appear in relation to any publication of my digital story.

    I have received a copy of this release form.

    Yes No Use of Digital Story Exceptions/CommentsIn a summary report for project reporting purposes.

    On any website, television broadcast or radio station.

    At any public presentation and knowledge exchange event.

    In any newsletter, news report, journal article and other visual, audio or written publication.

    For any education and teaching purpose.

    Other:

    Signature of Project Facilitator

    Date

    Signature of Digital Storyteller

    Date

  • 16 1713. WOrksHOP FOOd and Beverages CHeCklist

    Food and Beverages

    Bottled water

    Coffee/hot water and tea bags

    Milk/cream and sugar for coffee/tea

    Bottled juice

    Fresh fruit (i.e. grapes, strawberries, blueberries, apples, bananas, melons)

    Snack foods (i.e. pretzels, popcorn, cheese and crackers, cookies, yogurt)

    Lunch/supper (catered or home prepared)

    Other Food Related Items

    Cups for hot and/or cold beverages

    Paper plates/bowls

    Plastic utensils/cutlery

    Paper towels/napkins

    Plastic wrap/baggies for take home food items

    Garbage bags

    12. WOrksHOP equiPment and suPPlies CHeCklist

    Technical Equipment

    Computers

    Digital storytelling software

    Image scanner

    Printer

    Photocopier

    Digital camera

    Video recorder

    Voice recording set-up (audio-recorder, microphone and stand, windshield, script stand, headphones, speakers, etc.)

    LCD projector and screen

    Power cords and cables

    Portable storage devices (CDs, DVDs, USB data sticks)

    Carrying equipment (i.e. strong boxes)

    Supplies

    Flipchart paper and/or whiteboard

    Flipchart and/or whiteboard markers

    Masking tape

    Batteries for equipment

    Pens/pencils

    Scissors

    Writing paper/note pads

    Post-It Notes

    Folders for participants

    Envelopes for photos

    Kleenex tissues

    Advil/Tylenol for headaches

    Food and beverages

    Handouts for participants

    USBs

  • 18 19

    Certificate of CompletionPresented to

    For successfully completing the Summer Institute: nindibaajimomin Digital Storytelling on the

    Intergenerational Experiences of Residential Schools

    The Oral History Centre and the Indigenous Studies Department

    Name of Facilitator/Organizer Name of Facilitator/Organizer

    14. HOnOraria reCeiPt

    I confirm that I received $ (in cash) honorarium in appreciation of my time commitment to the project and to help offset any costs that I incurred to participant in the project described below:

    Name of Participant

    Title of Project

    Place of Participation

    Date of Participation

    Name of Project Facilitator

    15. CertiFiCate OF COmPletiOn temPlate

    Signature of Project Facilitator

    Date

    Signature of Participant

    Date

  • 20 21

    Budget Item Details Total Funds Required

    ReceivedFunds or In Kind Source

    Contract Fees and HonorariaTechnical supportHealth support workerElder(s)Spiritual/Traditional Support PersonMCChildcare providersVenueHall or Room rentalChairs for AudienceTables and chairs for participantsCoat RackRoom (private if needed)Childcare spaceTechnical Equipment and SuppliesLCD projector and screenLaptopLaptop and Projector connectorDigital cameraBatteriesDVD (for stories)Other SuppliesTobacco/cloth for offeringsKleenex tissuesSmudge Bowl/SmudgeInvitationsPhotocopying and printingPosters/PostcardsSignage (directions)Table clothsFood and Beverages OR FeastRefreshmentsHealthy snacksFeast FoodVolunteers (Gifts)GreetersElder HelpersParticipant Helpers (ie. Water)Total Project Budget

    17. digital stOrytelling COmmunity launCH Budget

    Launch Location Date Time

    16. PuBliC launCH/sCreening CHeCklist

    Post signs to provide directions/instructions for guests

    Arrange tables and chairs according to event requirements

    Prepare ceremonial/spiritual protocols

    Ensure gathering spaces are clean and tidy

    Ensure window coverings are adequately drawn to block sun glares

    Set-up and test LCD projector and computer equipment

    Set-up and test audio recording equipment (record title of event, date and time on audio tape and pause for participant recording)

    Confirm availability of technical support person

    Put Kleenex tissues on tables

    Put copies of reports and other event related materials on a presentation table for guests to pick up

    Ensure food and beverages are set-up/catering arranged

    Ensure Elders/support workers are available

  • 22 2319. FaCilitatOr and suPPOrt team Care CHeCklist temPlate

    Possible Responses

    physical Headaches Sleep disturbances Increased susceptibility to illness

    psychological/behavioural Preoccupation Increased use of alcohol and/or drugs Increased absenteeism Avoidance of returning calls,

    emails, connecting with clients Indecision Not able to concentrate or focus Heightened anxiety or irrational fears

    emotional Fluctuating moods Emotional exhaustion Numbness Reduced ability to feel sympathy or empathy Distancing (at work and/or home/friends) Increased anxiety and/or depression Cynicism

    spiritual Questioning faith Shifting of worldviews and/or core beliefs Stronger draw and/or connection

    Kindness and Care: Coping Skills

    Everyone is unique and will need to ensure they practice their own personal coping strategies.

    As facilitators, you can also plan, implement and follow through with ensuring there is a strategy throughout the project that could possibly include:

    Ensuring there is a complete Team assembled and confirmed that will support with different strengths and skill sets.

    Implement daily debriefings and check-ins. Have a follow up debriefing with the team

    to discuss which stories impacted them personally the most and why.

    Hold each other accountable to ensure everyone is practicing their self care and coping strategies (i.e. exercising, attending ceremonies, journaling, or whatever their strategies include).

    Schedule the agenda to ensure each team member has a breaks during the day.

    As team members, be mindful of each other and if you notice a Team member showing signs of fatigue connect with them and create a plan.

    Its not a matter of if we are impacted by the stories we hear, its a matter of when and how hard in fact, the more caring and compassionate we are, the more impacted we can become.

    It is vital that a care system for our helpers and facilitators is also considered to be an important preparation of the process as well.

    18. PartiCiPant Care CHeCklist temPlate

    Possible Responses

    physical Dizziness Sleep disturbances

    (insomnia or extreme fatigue) Restlessness Appetite change Startle response Dry mouth Holding breath Excessive perspiration

    psychological Preoccupation Indecision Not able to concentrate or focus Hyper critical and/or sensitive

    emotional Fluctuating moods Feeling emotionally numb and/or

    overwhelmed Withdrawal, irritability, anger, inattentiveness Increased anxiety and/or depression

    spiritual Questioning faith Stronger draw and/or connection

    Kindness and Care: Coping Skills

    Emotions are energy-in-motion its important to commit to finding healthy ways to release the energy by walking, going to the gym, dancing, find ways of having fun.

    Be mindful of, and try to avoid:

    Too much caffeine Excessive use of alcohol or drugs Isolating from friends, family and loved ones Withdrawing from activities

    Its important to talk about, and process, how you are feeling and what you are thinking.

    What you are experiencing is nOrmal and natural and you have every right to feel the way you do. This is a healing journey, you are not alone unless you choose to be. Find someone you trust and who can unconditionally listen and support you moving forward in a good way.

  • 24 25

    nikwiy ekwa niya

    Digital Storyteller: Wendy McNab

    Running was my screams, my loud voice, my ideas, my arguments, my joy, my truth, my conviction, my chaos, my thoughts, my quiet, my cocoon, my cheers, my madness, my soft voice. Looking for you? Looking for me? Looking for each other. Finding you. Finding me. Finding each other. Two primary objectives of the residential school system were to remove and isolate children from their home, families, traditions and cultures. Indeed sought, as was infamously said, To kill the Indian in the child. All were deprived of the care and nurturing of their parents, grandparents and communities (Excerpt from The Apology, Prime

    Minister Stephen Harper, 2008). The darkness inside my heart and soul moved outside of my body to become my self-comfort and my self-embrace. I learned to laugh at myself. I forgive myself for the mistakes I make. Im not bad. Im not horrible. In a garden of fresh smelling flowers sits a young lady with dreams and aspirations in a world full of chaos. She does not quiet her thoughts, she gratefully screams her arguments and ideas in deafening blasts of truth and conviction. Does she see her beauty? The soft, quiet one who resides within the blooming rose, in the sweet-smelling perfumes and protective cocoons of the soft petals.

    20. digital stOrytelling sCriPts

    My Journey into Motherhood

    Digital Storyteller: Lorena Fontaine

    When I found out I was pregnant with my daughter Sara, I was keenly aware of the impact the residential schools had on my life. I thought to myself, I dont know how to be a mother. What am I going to bring to this childs life? I know very little about my peoples history, I dont know how to speak my language. I was terrified to bring a child into this world because I didnt think I had anything to give a baby. I think a part of me was afraid that someone would see right through me and recognize my inability to be a mother and then they would take away my child. This is the story of my journey into motherhood. After the shock of my pregnancy wore off, my instinct told me that I needed to have Sara at home. The first battle I faced was that home births were not yet legal in the province I was living in, so the doctors refused to see me after I informed them that I was contemplating a home birth. I had to pretend I was going to deliver my baby in a hospital in order to obtain the services of a doctor. After I did a bit or research on midwifery, I arranged to have two Aboriginal midwives present during my delivery. It was legal in Manitoba to have a baby at home if there were two certified midwives present. After I made arrangements with the midwives, Saras birth fell into place. Two weeks prior to her due date, my partner and I packed up our car and drove to my mothers place. We spent the next fourteen days walking amongst the trees and the rocks that

    surrounded my family for generations. The land seemed to wash away any fears that I had about the birth. On Sarahs due date, one of my midwives requested a sweatlodge ceremony. Sometime during the sweat I started to have contractions. After 12 hours of hard labour I didnt think that I was going to be able to deliver Sarah on my own, I felt so weak. Then I noticed a picture of my grandmother hanging on the wall. The image of her standing beside fourteen children gave me the burst of energy I needed. I thought to myself, if my grandmother could give birth fourteen times, I could get through this one. Right before Sarah was born, my aunty put out tobacco for the sacred journey we were experiencing. My mother was the first to hold Sarah. She greeted her in our sacred Cree language. Then the cedar water that Sarah was bathed in was poured along the side of the house to connect her to the earth. A few days later, Sarahs placenta and umbilical cord were buried on a sacred place on the reserve so that she would always be connected to our territory. Sarahs birth was extremely political. She was the first child to be born in my community in over fifty years. I learned that the birthing process resides in the collective memory of Aboriginal women in my life. The residential school experience did not destroy that part of our life.

  • 26 27I Am My Mothers Daughter

    Digital Storyteller: Lisa Murdock

    I really admire my mother. Shes the most resilient person I know. My mother is a residential school Survivor. For eleven of her childhood years, she endured unthinkable crimes that no child, no human being, should ever have to experience. Unspeakable sins aimed at stripping away her natural-born identity. For eleven years, my mother remained shackled amidst the strictest of physical punishment, the cruelest of mental anguish, and the loneliest of abandonment. For eleven long, lonely years, and for almost a generation after that, my mother had survived more pain than I could ever begin to describe. If theres one thing that Ive come to realize, its that Ive been deeply affected by this pain that my mother carries. Sure, thereve been many happy, fun and exciting times in my life, but there have also been some not-so-good times. Painful times that I, like my mother,

    tried to keep hidden in the back of my mind, in the depths of my heart. No matter how hard I try to forget, Ill always remember those saddened times, times of being locked out, being alone and forgotten. Ill always remember the times of being cold and tired. And Ill always remember all the times Ive been worried and afraid. My mother doesnt talk about the tragedies she survived as a child, just as I dont talk about the aftermath of her harrowing experiences. The ever-revolving experiences that were passed along to me and that inherently belong to my children and to their children after that. And although she has tried to bury her horrific experiences in the far reaches of her mind, in the deepest parts of her soul, I can still see her pain, I can feel it. You see, I am my mothers daughter and I carry her pain in my heart.

    Mary-Lou and Me

    Digital Storyteller: Lisa Forbes

    This is a story about one of the ways someone survives, the way someone copes. Its also about what assimilation looks like, a picture of success. My mom as a young woman in Birtle, where she went to residential school. Shes an Indian, but she wore the new culture well. Where did she keep the part of her that was her cultural heritage? There are two parts of my mom, the girl who got her education and became a young woman in residential school far from home, a place where she would never live again; and the other, a cultural Indian woman from the reserve, who loved her family, did traditional sewing, had a Mooshum. She left one part of who she was; her life became something else. She married my dad and they made their own life. She tried to create a perfect family. Here is the family they made, the life she worked for. She coached our teams and made our clothes. We had music lessons and sports. She drove us in the dark winter mornings to sport practices. She sewed costumes and clothes into

    the night. In the day she went to her work family, dedicated, hard-working. Files home every night. Working too much. Working to death. My mom made bead-work and researched Indian, Mtis and settler history. She sat on the board at the Friendship Centre. This was her heritage; I didnt take part in this. My role was to study hard, be a good girl, achieve. My mom made my high school graduation dress painstakingly, with attention to every detail. Made to be beautiful. Made to be perfect. I wore the dress when I graduated. She stood by. My dad cried and hugged me, told me he loved me, that he was proud. I have a memory of my dads love in that moment and I have a beautiful dress. Would I rather have her, in all her imperfections, alive? Or gone? I am my mothers daughter. I am an extraordinary worker. My coping mechanism is socially acceptable, praiseworthy. There would be no praise had I said, I am an extraordinary drinker. I do many of the same things she did, but I fight them.

  • 28 29Walking in a Good Way on Mother Earth

    Digital Storyteller: Claudette Michell

    Four generations ago, my grandfather Tawapasim carried a drum for the people. The spirit of the drum is what guides me on my healing journey today. When the Church came, the drums were taken away and thrown into lakes. My ancestors now were forced to believe in religion, which has its basis in fear. Even though this occurred, the spirit of the drum was still there. It witnessed many forms of destruction to our families. These were in forms of spiritual, mental, emotional, and physical abuses. Several years ago, my son-in-law brought me a drum that was water-damaged. A woman friend of mine helped me to rebuild the drum. The

    name of the drum is Walking in a Good Way on Mother Earth. She is a grandmother spirit. I was told of a prophecy, there would be seven drums. When the women come back to the drums, the healing would begin. Women everywhere would begin to take back their spiritual power. The heartbeat of these drums would also help people to understand the destruction that is occurring to Mother Earth. The women need to come back to the drum. This will help them in their healing. We need to believe that her heartbeat will be the healing energy that will help our families and Mother Earth to heal.

    Resilience

    Digital Storyteller: Roberta Stout

    When terrible things happen, my mom says kaya apa sapih which in Cree means look forward and move ahead dont look back. This is the story of how I had to look back to find my way forward. It is how five years ago, I willingly chose to attend the residential school where my mother was interned five decades earlier. And as fate would have it, where I nurtured my first pregnancy. Three generations of women walled within the educational institute of Blue Quills. It is fall, takwakin ekwa. The time of year when leaves begin to blow and all the little children march back to school. E-kiskinohamatocihk. And what do I know of my mom, little Madeleines, experience when she was marched off to school? On the rare occasion, she has spoken of those 36 consecutive months. She has talked about second hand love witnessing with her little girl as her grade 3 teacher waited longfully and lovingly for the arrival of her RCMP boyfriend. She remembers painful separation wishing she could embrace her brothers who were just across the room from her, but untouchable - unreachable. She recounts chronic loneliness 36 consecutive months without the warmth of her beloved mother okawiya. Crying until her nose bled as

    she watched her parents pull away in their horse drawn buggy after the only visit they would make. And how could these experiences not have had roots and branches of effects? Part of going back to little Madeleines residential school, kiskinohamatokamikohk, was to piece together a childhood that is rarely remembered or talked about. I ate in the same small cafeteria as she would have, sit in classrooms which once served as dormitories and wander the corridors where the children marched two by two. Coming from a two room sod home, this place must have seemed like a giant monstrosity. Big, cold, foreign. Amidst these walls, little Madeleine learned resilience and became the vocal child leader. Studious and smart. Spaces and experiences which shaped my mom, which shaped me, which shape my daughter. And my mothers words stick of resilience stick with me: Get along, get through, get out. And now as fall returns and my own daughter marches off to school, decorated in full childhood innocence, I must withhold a deep and irrational fear that she will, like little Madeleine, be taken away from me for 36 consecutive months. Maka kaya apah sapih I let this go, I look forward and I move ahead.

  • 30 31Recommended Resources

    Indian residential schools settlement agreement, 2006. http://www.residentialschoolsettlement.ca/English.html

    Canada, Aboriginal peoples, and residential schools: They came for the children, 2012. http://www.attendancemarketing.com/

    ~attmk/TRC_jd/ResSchoolHistory _2012_02_24_Webposting.pdf

    Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Interim report, 2012. http://www.attendancemarketing.com/

    ~attmk/TRC_jd/Interim_report_English_electronic_copy.pdf

    Where are the Children? is dedicated to healing the legacy of residential schools by providing an interactive voice to the untold stories of Aboriginal boys and girls who attended residential schools in Canada between 1831 and 1990. www.wherearethechildren.ca

    Digital Storytelling Resources

    Centre for Digital Storytelling is an American based organization that supports people in creating and sharing meaningful stories from their lives, through a combination of thoughtful writing and digital media tools. www.storycentre.org

    Digital Storytelling is an American based best practices site that supports digital storytelling projects in educational settings, by providing information about funding sources, technology, project publication, and recommended websites for developing digital storytelling programs. courseweb.lis.illinois.edu/~jevogel2/ lis506/index.html

    nDigiDreams is an American based, Indigenous focused consulting and training company that specializes in instructional technology and digital storytelling focused on health, education, policy, and cultural preservation. www.ndigidreams.com

    Silence Speaks is an international digital storytelling initiative that supports the telling and witnessing of stories that all too often remain unspoken. Sponsored by the Centre for Digital Storytelling, Silence Speaks enables people to create short videos about their own lives that can then be shared locally and globally. www.silencespeaks.org

    Vimeo is an international video sharing site where people can create, share and watch hundreds of creative, amazing and inspiring videos. www.vimeo.com

    WordPress.com is an international site where people can start a blog or build their own website to share their digital stories with the world. www.wordpress.com

    YouTube is an international video sharing site where people can view, discover, share, personalize and upload videos. www.youtube.com

    21. resOurCes and reFerenCes

    Residential Schools Resources

    Aboriginal Healing Foundation is a national organization dedicated to providing resources to promote reconciliation and encourage and support Aboriginal people and their communities in building and reinforcing sustainable healing processes that address the legacy of residential schools, including intergenerational impacts. www.ahf.ca

    Recommended Resources

    Residential School Resources, including a condensed timeline of residential-school related events; a directory of residential schools in Canada; the AHF posters on misconceptions of residential school, stages of healing, and the healer/helper; and a directory of funding sources for healing activities. http://www.ahf.ca/publications/residential-school-resources

    Legacy of Hope Foundation is a national Aboriginal organization dedicated to educating and raising awareness and understanding about the legacy of residential schools, including the effects and intergenerational impacts on First Nations, Mtis and Inuit peoples. www.legacyofhope.ca

    Recommended Resources

    We were so far away: The Inuit experience of residential schools, 2010. http://www.legacyofhope.ca/downloads/wwsfa-english.pdf

    Hope and healing, 2011. http://www.legacyofhope.ca/downloads/hope-and-healing.pdf

    100 years of loss: The residential school system in Canada, 2011. http://www.legacyofhope.ca/downloads/ 100-years-of-loss-booklet.pdf

    Where are the children? Healing the legacy of the residential schools, 2013. http://www.legacyofhope.ca/downloads/watc-catalogue.pdf

    Inuit and the residential school system, 2013. http://www.legacyofhope.ca/downloads/inuit-and-the-rss.pdf

    Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada is a national organization dedicated to supporting the truth telling, healing and reconciliation process, as part of an overall holistic and comprehensive response to the Indian Residential School legacy and acknowledgement of both the injustices and harms experienced by Aboriginal peoples and the need for continued healing. www.trc.ca

  • 32 33

    Photos and Images

    flickr is a free stock photo site. www.flickr.com

    openphoto is a royalty-free stock photo and illustration site. www.openphoto.net

    stock.XCHNG is a free stock photo site. www.sxc.hu

    Creative Commons Licenses offers licensed photographs, music, clip art etc. search.creativecommons.org

    Music and Sound

    Free-Loops.com is a royalty-free site for free music, sounds, music software and VST Plugins. www.free-loops.com

    freeSFX is a free music and sound effects site. www.freesfx.co.uk

    Opsound is a free music site. www.opsound.org

    SoundFX Now! is a free music and sound site. www.soundfxnow.com

    Free Music Archive is a library of licensed audio downloads for public use. freemusicarchive.org

    Tools for Creating Digital Stories

    Software

    Adobe offers a variety of video editing products, for free download, trial download and purchase, including Photoshop and Premier Elements. www.adobe.com/downloads/ ?promoid=KAWQL

    Audacity is a sound editor with versions for Apple OS X, Windows and Linux. www.audacity.sourcforge.net

    Gimp is a free image editing program for Linux, Unix, Windows and Apple computers. www.gimp.org

    iMovie is a movie making software included with Apple OS X. www.support.apple.com/kb/dl859

    InAlbum is a unique slideshow maker available for free download and use on older versions of Windows. www.inalbum.com

    MovieMaker is a movie making software included with Windows XP. www.windows.microsoft.com

    Photo Story is a compelling slide show making software available for free download and use on Windows XP computers from Microsoft. www.microsoft.com

    QuickTime and QuickTime Pro is media player software available for free download and use on Apple and Windows computers. www.QuickTime.com

  • 34 35Ka Ni Kanichihk, Inc. (2013a). About Ka Ni Kanichihk. Retrieved from http://www.kanikanichihk.ca/?page_id=2

    Ka Ni Kanichihk, Inc. (2013b). Aboriginal women reclaiming our power. Retrieved from http://www.kanikanichihk.ca/?page_id=83

    Kirmayer, L. and Valaskakis, G. (2009). Healing traditions: the mental health of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press. Retrieved from http://www.ubcpress.ca/books/pdf/chapters/2008/HealingTraditions.pdf

    Kovach, M. (2010). Conversational method in Indigenous research. First Peoples Child & Family Review, 5(1): 40-48. Retrieved from http://www.fncfcs.com/sites/default/files/online-journal/vol5num1/Kovach_pp40.pdf

    Legacy of Hope Foundation. (2013). About residential schools: Healing and reconciliation. Retrieved from http://www.legacyofhope.ca/about-residential-schools/healing-reconciliation

    Legacy of Hope Foundation and Aboriginal Healing Foundation. (2011). Hope and healing. Retrieved from http://www.legacyofhope.ca/downloads/hope-and-healing.pdf

    Lowery, C. (1999). A qualitative model of long-term recovery for American Indian women. Journal of Human Behaviour and the Social Environment, 2(1): 35-50.

    nDigiDreams. (2013). Digital storytelling. Retrieved from http://ndigidreams.com/ds.html

    Prairie Womens Health Centre of Excellence. (2013). Digital stories First Nations women explore the legacy of residential schools. Retrieved from http://www.pwhce.ca/program_aboriginal_digitalStories.htm

    Prime Minister of Canada Stephen Harper. (2008). Prime Minister Harper offers full apology on behalf of Canadians for the Indian residential schools system. Retrieved from http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/media.asp?id=2149

    Prairie Womens Health Centre of Excellence. (2004). Saskatoon Aboriginal Womens Health Research Committee: Ethical guidelines for Aboriginal womens health research. Winnipeg, MB: Prairie Womens Health Centre of Excellence. Retrieved from http://www.pwhce.ca/ethicalGuidelines.htm

    Smith, L. (2006). Twenty-five Indigenous projects. Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples. London: Zed Books. Retrieved from http://books.google.ca/books?id=Nad7afStdr8C&pg=PA142&lpg=PA142&dq=Twenty-Five+Indigenous+Projects&source=bl&ots=lCjCd5vD4o&sig=G7jQRMu_flCawafc9d4oKMthAHI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=X7WvUcaDK67iyAHt9oGIDQ&ved=0CDAQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=Twenty-Five%20Indigenous%20Projects&f=false

    Smith, D., Varcoe, C. and Edwards, N. (2005). Turning around the intergenerational impact of residential schools on Aboriginal people: Implications for health policy and practice. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 37(4): 38-60.

    reFerenCes

    Aboriginal Healing Foundation. (2006). A healing journey: Reclaiming wellness. Volume 1. Final report of the Aboriginal Healing Foundation. Ottawa, ON: Aboriginal Healing Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.ahf.ca/downloads/final-report-vol-1.pdf

    Absolon, K. and Willett, C. (2004). Aboriginal research: Berry picking and hunting in the 21st century. First Peoples Child and Family Review, 1(1): 5-17.

    Acoose, S., Blunderfield, D., Dell, C. and Desjarlais, V. (2009). Beginning with our voices: How the experiential stories of First Nations women contribute to a national research project. Journal of Aboriginal Health, 4(2): 35-43.

    Adams, G. (2008). A guide to digital storytelling by members of the BBC Capture Wales Team. Retrieved from http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/audiovideo/sites/yourvideo/pdf/aguidetodigitalstorytelling-bbc.pdf

    Anderson, K. (2004). Speaking from the heart: Everyday storytelling and adult learning. Canadian Journal of Native Education, 28(1-2): 123-129.

    Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs. (2013). Residential Schools A Chronology. Retrieved from http://64.26.129.156/article.asp?id=2586

    Dion Stout, M., Kipling, G. and Stout, R. (2001). Aboriginal womens health research synthesis project: Final report. Winnipeg, MB: Centres of Excellence for Womens Health. Retrieved from http://www.bccewh.bc.ca/publications-resources/documents/aboriginalhealth.pdf

    Dion, S. (2004). Retelling to disrupt: Aboriginal people and stories of Canadian history. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 2(1): 55-76.

    Eisner, N., Fleming, N., Kaffel, N. and Vogel, J. (2007). How to create a digital story. Digital Storytelling: A Best Practices Website for School Library Media Specialists. Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://courseweb.lis.illinois.edu/~jevogel2/lis506/howto.html

    Glaser, B. (1965). The Constant Comparative Method. Social Problems, 12(4): 436-445.

    Gray, N., Or de Boehm, C., Farnsworth, A., and Wolf, D. (2010). Integration of creative expression into community-based participatory research and health promotion with Native Americans. Family & Community Health, 33(3):186-192.

    Hart, E. (1995). Getting Started in Oral Traditions Research. Occasional Papers of the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, No. 4. Yellowknife, NT: Government of the Northwest Territories. Retrieved from http://www.pwnhc.ca/research/downloads/OralTraditionsManual.pdf

  • 36 Schnarch, B. (2004). Ownership, control, access and possession (OCAP) or self-determination applied to research: A critical analysis of First Nations research and some options for First Nations communities. The Journal of Aboriginal Health, 1(1): 80-95. Retrieved from http://www.naho.ca/jah/english/jah01_01/journal_p80-95.pdf

    Stout, R. (2010). kiskyitamawin miyo-mamitonecikan: Urban Aboriginal women and mental health. Winnipeg, MB: Prairie Womens Health Centre of Excellence. Retrieved from http://www.pwhce.ca/urbanAboriginalWomenMentalHealth.htm

    Stout, R., kiskinohamttpnsk and nitpwewininn Storytellers (2012). nitpwewininn: Ongoing effects of residential schools on Aboriginal women Toward intergenerational reconciliation. Unpublished final report. March 2012. Submitted to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

    Stout, R. and Peters, S. (2011). kiskinohamttpnsk: Intergenerational effects on professional First Nations women whose mothers are residential school survivors. Winnipeg, MB: Prairie Womens Health Centre of Excellence. Retrieved from http://www.pwhce.ca/kiskino.htm

    Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (2012). Interim report. Retrieved from http://www.attendancemarketing.com/~attmk/TRC_jd/Interim_report_English_electronic_copy.pdf

    Where are the Children? (2013). Blackboard: Chapter 11: From truth to reconciliation. Retrieved from http://www.wherearethechildren.ca/en/blackboard/page-19.html

    Yellow Horse Brave Heart, M. (1999). Gender differences in the historical trauma response among the Lakota. Journal of Health and Social Policy, 10(4): 1-21.

Recommended

View more >