Effect of rice husk ash and plastic fibers on concrete ... industrial and domestic wastes such as fly ash, rice husk ash, blast furnace slag, timber ash, steel fiber, glass fiber and plastic wastes.

  • Published on
    23-Mar-2018

  • View
    212

  • Download
    0

Transcript

<ul><li><p>INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CIVIL AND STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING </p><p>Volume 6, No 1, 2015 </p><p> Copyright by the authors - Licensee IPA- Under Creative Commons license 3.0 </p><p>Research article ISSN 0976 4399 </p><p>Received on January, 2015 Published on August 2015 25 </p><p>Effect of rice husk ash and plastic fibers on concrete strength Ankur, Varinder Singh, Ravi Kant Pareek </p><p>Department of Civil Engineering, JCDM College of Engineering, Sirsa </p><p>ankurkamboj110@gmail.com </p><p>doi:10.6088/ijcser.6003 </p><p>ABSTRACT </p><p>This paper reports the study of compressive strength and split tensile strength of concrete </p><p>involving rice husk ash (RHA) and plastic fiber in different proportions. M-20 grade of </p><p>concrete was taken for experimental study. RHA content was used from 5% to 15% at the </p><p>interval of 5% by replacing Ordinary Portland Cement (O.P.C.) and plastic fibers were used </p><p>from 1% to 3% at the interval of 1% by replacing the coarse aggregate. Plastic fibers were </p><p>obtained by cutting the polythene bags into small pieces. The compressive strength and split </p><p>tensile strength of concrete was checked at 7 days and 28 days of curing period. The results </p><p>show that concrete samples having RHA and plastic fibers showed better strength as </p><p>compared to controlled concrete samples. </p><p>Keyword: Rice husk ash (RHA), Plastic fiber, Compressive strength, Split tensile strength </p><p>1. Introduction </p><p>Concrete is a man-made material which is used for various construction works such as house </p><p>construction, bridge construction, roads and pavements. Simply, concrete is a mixture of </p><p>cement paste and aggregates. Concrete is an important part of societys infrastructure. </p><p>Concrete has unlimited opportunities for advanced applications, design and construction </p><p>techniques. It is the material of choice where strength, impermeability, durability, </p><p>performance, fire resistance and abrasion resistance are needed. Its high compressive strength </p><p>and mould ability has made its widespread use. It has major disadvantages that it is brittle and </p><p>weak in tension. Still concrete is better option than any other available materials for </p><p>construction works. Concrete with advanced technologies such as reinforce cement concrete </p><p>(R.C.C.) and fiber reinforced concrete (F.R.C.) provides extra strength and durability against </p><p>sliding, cracking, buckling and overturning. Concrete properties can be improved by the use </p><p>of industrial and domestic wastes such as fly ash, rice husk ash, blast furnace slag, timber ash, </p><p>steel fiber, glass fiber and plastic wastes. These wastes can be found as natural materials, by-</p><p>products or industrial wastes. Dumping of these wastes on earth surface is causing the </p><p>environment pollution. Rice husk ash (RHA) is a waste material, is a by-product obtained </p><p>from the burning of rice husk. It has high reactivity and pozzolonic property. To conserve </p><p>resources, utilization of industrial and biogenic wastes as supplementary cementing materials </p><p>has become an important part of concrete construction. Industrialization has resulted in large </p><p>deposition of plastic waste. It is non-biodegradable material which is harmful to the </p><p>environment. Plastic waste can be used as fibers in concrete to improve the properties of </p><p>concrete. Many researches were conducted to use industrial by-products and wastes such as </p><p>rice husk ash and plastic waste. Khatri et al. investigated the impact of admixture and RHA in </p><p>concrete mix design. It was found that admixture increased the compressive strength of </p><p>concrete about 30% at 7 days and 50% at 28 days as compared to controlled concrete. It also </p><p>used rice husk ash (RHA) as a partial replacement of cement in the ratio of 5% and 15%. It </p><p>was observed that concrete having 15% rice husk ash obtained more strength with respect to </p></li><li><p>Effect of rice husk ash and plastic fibers on concrete strength </p><p>Ankur, Varinder Singh, Ravi Kant Pareek </p><p> International Journal of Civil and Structural Engineering 26 Volume 6 Issue 1 2015 </p><p>5% RHA by 13.38% at 7 days and 19.78 % at 28 days respectively. Kulkarni et al. studied the </p><p>effect of rice husk ash on properties of concrete. In this study, cement was replaced by RHA </p><p>from 0 to 30% at an interval of 10%. Compressive strength of concrete was tested at 7 days </p><p>and 28 days. It was found that there was about 4% increase in strength as compared to normal </p><p>concrete after addition of 20%RHA at 7 days and after addition of 10% RHA to normal </p><p>concrete, there was about 16% increase in strength as compared to normal concrete. Nibudey </p><p>et al. examined the strength prediction of plastic fiber reinforced concrete. In this study, </p><p>plastic fibers were added from 0% to 3% by weight of cement in interval of 0.5%. It was </p><p>found that maximum compressive and split tensile strength were at 1% of fiber content. </p><p>Ramadevi et al. experimented the properties of concrete with plastic PET (bottle) fibers as </p><p>fine aggregates. Percentage of plastic bottle fibers was taken as 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 6%s by </p><p>replacing the fine aggregates. Result showed that maximum compressive strength, flexural </p><p>strength and split tensile strength of concrete were observed at 2% plastic fiber. Deotale et al. </p><p>studied the effect of partial replacement of cement by fly ash, rice husk ash (RHA) with using </p><p>steel fiber in concrete. In this study, it started proportion from 30% fly ash (F.A.) and 0% rice </p><p>husk ash (RHA) mixed together in concrete by replacement of cement with gradual increase </p><p>of RHA by 2.5% and simultaneously gradual decrease of F.A. by 2.5%. It was found that </p><p>compressive strength of concrete increases with the increase in the percentage of F.A. and </p><p>RHA up to (22.5% F.A. and 7.5% RHA) by replacing cement in concrete. </p><p>2. Experimental investigation </p><p>In the experimental investigation, Cement concrete cubes of size 150mm x 150mm x 150mm </p><p>and concrete cylinders of size 150mm x 300mm with different proportions to find out the </p><p>compressive strength and split tensile strength were casted. Specimens were tested after a </p><p>curing period of 7 days and 28 days. Table-1 shows the details of specimens casted for </p><p>experimental investigation. </p><p>Table 1: Details of Specimens </p><p>S. </p><p>No. TEST Specimen </p><p>RHA </p><p>Added </p><p>(%) </p><p>Plastic </p><p>Fiber </p><p>Added </p><p>(%) </p><p>No. of </p><p>Specimens </p><p>For 7 </p><p>days </p><p>For 28 </p><p>days </p><p>1 Compressive </p><p>Strength Test Cube </p><p>0 0 2 2 </p><p>5 1 2 2 </p><p>10 2 2 2 </p><p>15 3 2 2 </p><p>2 Split Tensile </p><p>Strength Test Cylinder </p><p>0 0 2 2 </p><p>5 1 2 2 </p><p>10 2 2 2 </p><p>15 3 2 2 </p></li><li><p>Effect of rice husk ash and plastic fibers on concrete strength </p><p>Ankur, Varinder Singh, Ravi Kant Pareek </p><p> International Journal of Civil and Structural Engineering 27 Volume 6 Issue 1 2015 </p><p>3. Material properties </p><p>For the purpose of experimental investigation, the following material properties were tested. </p><p>Ordinary Portland Cement of grade-43 was used in this study. The physical properties of </p><p>O.P.C. are given below in Table-2. Locally available fine aggregate (sand) and coarse </p><p>aggregate of size 20mm and 10mm from the market were used in this study. Their physical </p><p>properties are shown in Tables 3 and Table 4. Rice husk ash was purchased from Pashupati </p><p>Rice and Geneal Mills, Sirsa. Physical properties of RHA are shown in Table-5. Domestic </p><p>waste polythene was used as plastic fiber. Plastic polythene was cut into small pieces of </p><p>different length by scissor. Specimens were tested after a curing period of 7 and 28 days. </p><p>Compressive strength and split tensile strength tests were performed on compression testing </p><p>machine. Out of 16 concrete cubes, 8 cubes were tested at 7 days and remaining were tested </p><p>at 28 days as shown in Figure 1. Out of 16 concrete cylinders, 8 cylinders were tested at 7 </p><p>days and remaining were tested at 28 days as shown in Figure 2. </p><p>Table 2: Physical Properties of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC-43) </p><p>S. No. Characteristics Test Values </p><p>1 Normal Consistency (%) 27 </p><p>2 </p><p>Setting Time (Minutes) </p><p>Initial </p><p>Final </p><p>48 </p><p>205 </p><p>3 Soundness (mm) 2.00 </p><p>4 Fineness (%) 2.9 </p><p>5 Specific Gravity 2.44 </p><p>Table 3: Physical Properties of Fine Aggregates </p><p>S. No. Characteristics Test Values </p><p>1 Water absorption (%) 0.83 </p><p>2 Specific gravity 2.54 </p><p>3 Fineness modulus 3.25 </p><p>Table 4: Physical Properties of Coarse Aggregates </p><p>S. No. Characteristics Test Values </p><p>1 Water absorption (%) 0.55 </p><p>2 Specific gravity 2.75 </p><p>3 Fineness modulus 6.21 </p><p>Table 5: Physical Properties of Rice Husk Ash </p><p>S. No. Characteristics Test Values </p><p>1 Normal consistency </p><p>(%) </p><p>18 </p><p>2 Specific gravity 2.40 </p><p>3 Setting Time (Minutes) </p><p>Initial </p><p>Final </p><p>205 </p><p>258 </p></li><li><p>Effect of rice husk ash and plastic fibers on concrete strength </p><p>Ankur, Varinder Singh, Ravi Kant Pareek </p><p> International Journal of Civil and Structural Engineering 28 Volume 6 Issue 1 2015 </p><p> Figure 1: Compressive Strength Testing on Cubes </p><p> Figure 2: Split tensile strength testing on cylinders </p><p>4. Results and discussion </p><p>Compressive strength of concrete was measured at the ages of 7 and 28 days and shown in </p><p>Table-6 and Table-7. It was observed that the average compressive strength of concrete was </p><p>15.23 MPa and 22.67 MPa with the replacement of 5% RHA and 1% plastic fibers which </p><p>shows that 1.11% and 1.08% increase in the compressive strength at 7 and 28 days </p><p>respectively. Average compressive strength of concrete was 16.56 MPa and 25.67 MPa with </p><p>the replacement of 10% RHA and 2% plastic fibers which shows that 1.20% and 1.22% </p><p>increase in the compressive strength at 7 and 28 days respectively. It was observed that the </p><p>average compressive strength of concrete was 13.67 MPa and 20.78 MPa with the </p><p>replacement of 15% RHA and 3% plastic fibers which shows that 0.99% and 0.98 % decrease </p><p>in the compressive strength at 7 and 28 days respectively. Split tensile strength test results of </p><p>fiber reinforced concrete with and without RHA and plastic fibers are presented in Table-8 </p></li><li><p>Effect of rice husk ash and plastic fibers on concrete strength </p><p>Ankur, Varinder Singh, Ravi Kant Pareek </p><p> International Journal of Civil and Structural Engineering 29 Volume 6 Issue 1 2015 </p><p>and Table-9. It was observed that the average spilt tensile strength of concrete was 2.09 MPa </p><p>and 4.42 MPa with the replacement of 5% RHA and 1% plastic fibers which shows that </p><p>1.09% and 1.07% increase in the spilt tensile strength at 7 and 28 days respectively. Average </p><p>spilt tensile strength of concrete was 2.4 MPa and 4.99 MPa with the replacement of 10% </p><p>RHA and 2% plastic fibers which shows that 1.26% and 1.21% increase in the spilt tensile </p><p>strength at 7 and 28 days respectively. It was observed that the average spilt tensile strength </p><p>of concrete was 1.88 MPa and 4.06 MPa with the replacement of 15% RHA and 3% plastic </p><p>fibers which shows that 0.98% and 0.98 % decrease in the spilt tensile strength at 7 and 28 </p><p>days respectively. </p><p>Table 6: Compressive strength data at the age of 7 days for M20 concrete </p><p>S. </p><p>No. </p><p>Sample </p><p>No. </p><p>RHA Used </p><p>(%) </p><p>Plastic </p><p>Fibers Used </p><p>(%) </p><p>Compressive </p><p>Strength (MPa) </p><p>Average </p><p>Compressive </p><p>Strength (MPa) </p><p>1 1 </p><p>0 0 13.55 </p><p>13.78 2 14.00 </p><p>2 1 </p><p>5 1 15.56 </p><p>15.23 2 14.89 </p><p>3 1 </p><p>10 2 16.00 </p><p>16.56 2 17.11 </p><p>4 1 </p><p>15 3 13.78 </p><p>13.67 2 13.55 </p><p>Table 7: Compressive Strength Data at the Age of 28 Days for M20 Concrete </p><p>S. </p><p>No. </p><p>Sample </p><p>No. </p><p>RHA Used </p><p>(%) </p><p>Plastic </p><p>Fibers Used </p><p>(%) </p><p>Compressive </p><p>Strength (MPa) </p><p>Average </p><p>Compressive </p><p>Strength (MPa) </p><p>1 1 </p><p>0 0 22.22 </p><p>21 2 19.78 </p><p>2 1 </p><p>5 1 21.78 </p><p>22.67 2 23.56 </p><p>3 1 </p><p>10 2 25.78 </p><p>25.67 2 25.56 </p><p>4 1 </p><p>15 3 21.11 </p><p>20.78 2 20.44 </p></li><li><p>Effect of rice husk ash and plastic fibers on concrete strength </p><p>Ankur, Varinder Singh, Ravi Kant Pareek </p><p> International Journal of Civil and Structural Engineering 30 Volume 6 Issue 1 2015 </p><p>13.7815.23</p><p>16.56</p><p>13.67</p><p>0</p><p>2</p><p>4</p><p>6</p><p>8</p><p>10</p><p>12</p><p>14</p><p>16</p><p>18</p><p>M-20 Concrete having 5%</p><p>RHA &amp; 1% P.F.</p><p>Concrete having 10%</p><p>RHA &amp; 2% P.F.</p><p>Concrete having 15%</p><p>RHA &amp; 3% P.F.</p><p>Co</p><p>mp</p><p>ress</p><p>ive</p><p> Str</p><p>en</p><p>gth</p><p> in</p><p> MP</p><p>a</p><p> Figure 3: Comparison of Concrete Compressive Strength with Different Replacements by </p><p>RHA and Plastic Fibers at 7 Days. </p><p>2122.67</p><p>25.67</p><p>20.78</p><p>0</p><p>5</p><p>10</p><p>15</p><p>20</p><p>25</p><p>30</p><p>M-20 Concrete having 5%</p><p>RHA &amp; 1% P.F.</p><p>Concrete having 10%</p><p>RHA &amp; 2% P.F.</p><p>Concrete having 15%</p><p>RHA &amp; 3% P.F.</p><p>Com</p><p>pressiv</p><p>e </p><p>str</p><p>en</p><p>gth</p><p> in</p><p> MP</p><p>a </p><p>Figure 4: Comparison of Concrete Compressive Strength with Different Replacements by </p><p>RHA and Plastic Fibers at 28 Days </p><p>Table 8: Split Tensile Strength Data at the Age of 7 Days for M20 Concrete </p><p>S. No. Sample </p><p>No. </p><p>RHA Used </p><p>(%) </p><p>Plastic Fibers </p><p>Used (%) </p><p>Split Tensile </p><p>Strength (MPa) </p><p>Average Split </p><p>Tensile Strength </p><p>(MPa) </p></li><li><p>Effect of rice husk ash and plastic fibers on concrete strength </p><p>Ankur, Varinder Singh, Ravi Kant Pareek </p><p> International Journal of Civil and Structural Engineering 31 Volume 6 Issue 1 2015 </p><p>1 1 </p><p>0 0 1.70 </p><p>1.91 2 2.12 </p><p>2 1 </p><p>5 1 1.98 </p><p>2.09 2 2.19 </p><p>3 1 </p><p>10 2 2.47 </p><p>2.4 2 2.33 </p><p>4 1 </p><p>15 3 1.77 </p><p>1.88 2 1.98 </p><p>Table 9: Split Tensile Strength Data at the Age of 28 Days for M20 Concrete </p><p>S. No. Sample </p><p>No. </p><p>RHA Used </p><p>(%) </p><p>Plastic Fibers </p><p>Used (%) </p><p>Split Tensile </p><p>Strength (MPa) </p><p>Average Split </p><p>Tensile Strength </p><p>(MPa) </p><p>1 1 </p><p>0 0 4.24 </p><p>4.14 2 4.03 </p><p>2 1 </p><p>5 1 4.24 </p><p>4.42 2 4.60 </p><p>3 1 </p><p>10 2 4.88 </p><p>4.99 2 5.09 </p><p>4 1 </p><p>15 3 4.31 </p><p>4.06 2 3.81 </p><p>1.912.09</p><p>2.4</p><p>1.88</p><p>0</p><p>0.5</p><p>1</p><p>1.5</p><p>2</p><p>2.5</p><p>3</p><p>M-20 Concrete having 5%</p><p>RHA &amp; 1% P.F.</p><p>Concrete having 10%</p><p>RHA &amp; 2% P.F.</p><p>Concrete having 15%</p><p>RHA &amp; 3% P.F.</p><p>Sp</p><p>lit </p><p>Te</p><p>nsi</p><p>le S</p><p>tre</p><p>ng</p><p>th in</p><p> MP</p><p>a </p><p> Figure 5: Comparison of Concrete Split Tensile Strength with Different </p><p>Replacements by RHA and Plastic Fibers at 7 days. </p></li><li><p>Effect of rice husk ash and plastic fibers on concrete strength </p><p>Ankur, Varinder Singh, Ravi Kant Pareek </p><p> International Journal of Civil and Structural Engineering 32 Volume 6 Issue 1 2015 </p><p> Figure 6: Comparison of Concrete Split Tensile Strength with Different Replacements by </p><p>RHA and Plastic Fibers at 28 days. </p><p>5. Conclusions </p><p>Based on the experimental study with different samples of concrete and different proportions </p><p>of rice husk ash (RHA) and plastic fiber, following conclusions were drawn-: </p><p>1. The replacement of 5 % and 10% RHA and 1% and 2% plastic fibers shows increase in the compressive strength of concrete cubes at 7 days as well as at 28 days. </p><p>2. The replacement of 5 % and 10% RHA and 1% and 2% plastic fibers shows increase in the split tensile strength of concrete cylinders at 7 days...</p></li></ul>

Recommended

View more >