13-14 ESO Signature Magazine Issue 1

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ESO Signature Magazine September & October 2013.

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SEPT/NOV 2013Nosferatu oN HalloweeNA chilling Davis Concert Organ treataN all-Mozart MastersSara Davis Buechner returns to the ESO this fallBroadways leadiNg MeNJack Everly conducts the Robbins Popsoperetta MagicJoin us for our Lighter Classics season debutwww.lexusofedmonton.ca Conveniently located on 170 St 780-466-8300 *Prices and payments subject to change without notice. Contact Lexus of Edmonton for complete details.IS2014250$43,002*Well Equipped From: 2014 IS 250 HIGHLIGHTSHID HeadlampsSmart key system with push button startPerforated, heated front seatsDrive mode selectIncludes freight/PDI and block heater$5,000* $455*Down PaymentSecurity deposit waivedMonthly Lease Payment3.9%*Lease for 48 months2.9%**Finance for 24 monthsALL-NEW LEXUS ISIT CUT ITS TEETH ON THE TRACK, WHICH EXPLAINS ITS BITECome feel the difference! LEXUS OF EDMONTON IS PROUD TO SPONSOR THE EDMONTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 000Sig-Lexus-FP.indd 1 8/20/13 2:01:15 PM Signature1_2013_p36-01.indd 1 9/10/13 1:45:39 PMSUPPORTING ALL THOSE WHO SEE THE STAGE AS THEIR DREAM DESTINATION.000Sig-AirCanada-FP.indd 1 8/13/13 9:21:22 AMSignature1_2013_p02-03.indd 2 9/6/13 11:52:10 AMTHE EdmonTon SympHony orcHESTrasignature Contents Volume 29, Number 1 | september/november 2 0 1 32013/2014 SEASONwelcomeArtistic & leAdership teAm(Eddins, Petrov, Uchida, Rival)edmonton symphony orchestrA 2012/2013hAlloween speciAl previewDont be afraid, its just the Davis Concert Organ. And German organist Mathias Rehfeldt is in command, playing the score to the silent film Nosferatu.midweek clAssics hAndel, mozArt & Beethoven (September 18)Jean-Philippe Tremblay, conductor Serhiy Salov, pianoroBBins pops leAding men of BroAdwAy (September 20 & 21)Jack Everly, conductorTed Keegan, Hayden Tee, Richard Todd Adams, & Kathy Voytko, vocalists Strathcona Theatre Company male ensemblelAndmArk clAssic mAsters spAnish symphony (September 28)William Eddins, conductorElmar Oliveira, violinroBBins lighter clAssics operettA mAgic (OctOber 10)Robert Bernhardt, conductorAmy Wallis, sopranosundAy showcAse mendelssohn & rAchmAninoff (OctOber 20)James Feddeck, conductorRobert Uchida, violinAdam Zukiewicz, pianofridAy mAsters / lAndmArk clAssic mAsters mAsterful mozArt (NOvember 1 & 2)William Eddins, conductorSara Davis Buechner, pianoNora Bumanis, harp, Elizabeth Faulkner, fluteSarah Tako, bassoonstories from the Audienceeso / frAncis winspeAr centre for music BoArd of directors & AdministrAtionpg. 5pg. 6pg. 7pg. 8pg. 10pg. 13pg. 15pg. 18pg. 23pg. 27pg. 30pg. 341924on the CoverTalented young organist Mathias Rehfeldt makes his Winspear Centre debut on the Davis Concert Organ, performing his astounding score written to accompany the classic German film Nosferatu. A restored version of the 1922 vampire tale will be projected above the stage as Mr. Rehfeldt presents his score. This joint production of the Winspear Centre and Edmonton Symphony Orchestra takes place on Halloween night. See pages 8 & 9 for more.puBlished for the edmonton symphony orchestra at the Francis Winspear Centre for music9720 102 Avenue, Edmonton AB T5J 4B2Administration: 780-428-1108Box Office: 780-428-1414Email: info@winspearcentre.comWebsite: www.edmontonsymphony.comeso editor D.T. Bakerprogram notes John Estacio & D.T. BakerLetters to the editor, comments and/or suggestions are welcome.puBlished By10259 105th Street, Edmonton AB T5J 1E3Inquiries: 780-990-0839Fax: 780-425-4921Email: sales@venturepublishing.caWebsite: www.venturepublishing.ca publisher Ruth Kelly associate publisher Joyce Byrne director of custom content Mifi Purvis art director Charles Burke associate art director Andrea deBoer assistant art director Colin Spence advertising sales Anita McGillis Glenda Dennis Kathy Kelley Signature magazine, the official publication of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, is published from September to June.Contents copyright 2013 by Edmonton Symphony Orchestra/ Francis Winspear Centre for Music. No part of this publication should be reproduced without written permission. 10signature 3september/November 2013SUPPORTING ALL THOSE WHO SEE THE STAGE AS THEIR DREAM DESTINATION.Air Canada is proud to contribute to our thriving arts scene.2S163401B_AirCan_Signature.indd 1 13-08-08 4:15 PM000Sig-AirCanada-FP.indd 1 8/13/13 9:21:22 AM Signature1_2013_p02-03.indd 3 2013-09-10 1:48 PMWCreate your masterpiece.Edmontons first golf course community in two decades, now pre-selling.JagareRidge.com South of Ellerslie on 141 Street000Sig-Melcor-FP.indd 1 8/20/13 3:37:05 PMSignature1_2013_p04-05.indd 4 2013-09-06 11:57 AMW!ESO / Winspear Centre Vision: Providing outstanding music experiences for individuals, families and the community and a place where those experiences evoke the height of personal emotion, adventure and excitement.Welcome Welcome!At 62 years, Out in the real wOrld mOst peOple wOuld be cOnsidering retirement, or at least thinking about it. But in the life of an orchestra 62 years means that an ensemble is just starting to come of age. Three generations of musicians will have come and gone, thousands of pieces will have been played, and hundreds of thousands of listeners will have the pleasure of sharing the wonders of live music. An orchestra of this age really starts to accumulate a history.One of the greatest elements of the ESO history is around you the fabulous Winspear Centre and the mighty Davis Concert Organ. The young and talented German organist/com-poser Mathias Rehfeldt will showcase this part of our legacy on All Hallows Eve night with a rare presentation of the classic silent film from 1922, Nosferatu the Vampire. Incidentally, this is also the first film I ever accompanied, so I have a special connection with this performance. But the most important part of an orchestras history is the people, the musicians, those who make the music. It is our pleasure to welcome back some of our best friends, names that you will recognize Bernhardt, Everly, and Buechner to start of this ... well, lets call it a coming of age season. Welcome back to your Edmonton Symphony Orchestra.william eddins 000Sig-Melcor-FP.indd 1 8/20/13 3:37:05 PM10417 - 174 Street, Edmonton, AB T5S 1H1 r P: (780) 484-0831 F: (780) 486-0698E: ask_us@pfcustomcountertops.com r www.pfcustomcountertops.comCustom CountertopsSignature1_2013_p04-05.indd 5 9/6/13 11:59:57 AMWCreate your masterpiece.Edmontons first golf course community in two decades, now pre-selling.JagareRidge.com South of Ellerslie on 141 Street000Sig-Melcor-FP.indd 1 8/20/13 3:37:05 PMSignature1_2013_p04-05.indd 4 2013-09-06 11:57 AMAartistic & leadership team Photo: Michael WoolleyPhoto: Michael WoolleySO Concertmaster RobeRt Uchida has been hailed for his ravishing sound, eloquence and hypnotic intensity (Strings magazine). He enjoys a varied career as a soloist, chamber musician, concertmaster and educator. His performances across North America and Europe have been received with great critical ac-claim. Mr. Uchida previously served as Concert-master of Symphony Nova Scotia and Associate Concertmaster of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, and has acted as Guest Concertmas-ter for the Netherlands Radio Chamber Phil-harmonic, Royal Flemish Philharmonic, and the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. He has worked as concertmaster with many of the worlds top conductors, including Valery Gergiev, Kurt Masur, Edo de Waart, and Pinchas Zukerman. In recent years he has been a featured soloist with several of Canadas orchestras including the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Orches-tre de la Francophonie, Ottawa Symphony, Symphony Nova Scotia, and Symphony New Brunswick. His recital and chamber music performances have included prestigious venues including Lincoln Center (New York), Muziekgebouw (Amsterdam), and the Glenn Gould Studio (Toronto). He has been a guest violinist at a number of Canadian festivals and chamber music series.An advocate of new music, Robert Uchida has worked with many composers including John Corigliano and Richard Danielpour, and has given premieres of works by Tim Brady, John Frantzen, Augusta Read-Thomas, Scott Wollschleger, and recorded the premiere of the Sonata for Solo Violin by Andrew Violette for Innova Records. Robert has held teaching positions at Acadia University, the Manhattan School of Music Pre-College, and the National Arts Centres Young Artist Program. He is Ar-tistic Director of the Acadia Summer Strings Festival in Wolfville and is frequently invited to give masterclasses at schools across the country. Mr. Uchida performs on a Lorenzo Ventapane violin made in Naples, Italy, in 1820, bows by Peccatte and Sartory, and a baroque bow by Max Kasper. He currently lives in Edmonton with his wife Laura and their two children.Estudio at his home in Minneapolis, where he lives with his wife Jen (a clarinetist), and their sons Raef and Riley.While conducting has been his principal pursuit, he continues to perform as pianist, organist and harpsichordist. He has conducted the ESO from the keyboard on many occasions, and in 2007, joined then-ESO concertmaster Martin Riseley and cellist Yo-Yo Ma in Brahmss Piano Trio No. 1 at a gala concert celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Winspear Centre. In 2008, he conducted Gershwins Porgy and Bess for Opra Lyon, leading to repeat performances in Lyon, London, and at the Edinburgh International Festival in 2010. Other international highlights include a 2009 tour of South Africa, where Bill conducted three gala concerts with soprano Rene Fleming and the KwaZulu-Natal Philharmonic Orchestra. On May 8, 2012, Bill made his Carnegie Hall debut conducting the ESO at a memorable concert featuring four Canadian soloists, and music by three Canadian composers alongside Martins rarely-performed Symphony No. 1. ow in his eighth season as Music Director of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, William eddins has a captivating energy, a magnetic stage presence, and an adventurous musical curiosity that continues to propel the orchestra to unique, new and exciting achievements. His commitment to the entire spectrum of the ESO audience brings him to the podium for performances in every subscription series, as well as for a wide variety of galas and specials. A distinguished and versatile pianist, Bill was bitten by the conducting bug while in his sophomore year at the Eastman School of Music. In 1989, he began conducting studies at the University of Southern California with Daniel Lewis, and Assistant Conductorships with both the Minnesota Orchestra and the Chicago Symphony (the latter under the leadership of Daniel Barenboim) followed.Bill has many non-musical hobbies including cooking, eating, discussing food and planning dinner parties. He is also quite fond of biking, tennis, reading and pinball. He recently completed building a state-of-the-art recording NPhoto: Michael WoolleyPhoto: Michael Woolleysignature www.edmontonsymphony.comSignature1_2013_p06-07.indd 6 9/6/13 12:01:48 PMIn addition to our own concerts, the ESO provides orchestral accompaniment for performances by Edmonton Opera and Alberta Ballet. Composer in Residence program generously sponsored byThe ESO works in proud partnership with the AF of M (American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada) Local 390.Photo: Michael WoolleyTHE EdmonTon SympHony orcHESTra2013/2014 SEASONPhoto: Michael WoolleyRobert rival, a native Albertan, returns for a third season as the Edmonton Symphony Orchestras Com-poser in Residence. His music, writ-ten in a contemporary tonal style and inspired by the Canadian wilderness, literature, and classical and romantic musical forms, has been described as well crafted, engaging, immediately appealing, melodic and accessible, sophisticated, and memorable. His song cycle, Red Moon and Other Songs of War, was called an unequivocal hit. He has completed four contrasting ESO commissions to date: Lullaby, for the orchestras Carnegie Hall debut lauded as an atmospheric dream world and a work of quiet rapture and refined sensibility. The muscular Achilles & Scamander; the dazzling Whirlwind, inspired by the flocking flight of Bohe-mian Waxwings; and the sweeping Sym-phony No. 2 Water whose textures and rhythms were suggested by the ocean and rainforest. Rival runs the ESOs Young Composers Project. He has de-veloped two new initiatives: podcasts on the contemporary music the orchestra programs and live-blogging of its open dress rehearsals. He holds a doctorate in composition from the University of To-ronto, teaches theory at the University of Alberta, lives with his wife Chantal-Andre Samson, a realist oil painter, and their toddler son, Raphal, and enjoys running in Edmontons river valley. robertrival.comConductor LaureateComposer in Residence[ ViOLiN i ]Robert Uchida, ConcertmasterThe John & Barbara Poole Family Concertmaster ChairEric Buchmann, Associate ConcertmasterVirginie Gagn, Assistant ConcertmasterBroderyck OlsonRichard CaldwellJoanna Ciapka-SangsterAlissa CheungAnna KozakAiyana Anderson-HowattNeda Yamach[ ViOLiN ii ]Dianne New 1Susan Flook 2Heather BergenPauline BronsteinRobert HryciwZo SellersMurray VaasjoTatiana Warszynski[ ViOLA ]Stefan Jungkind 1Charles Pilon 2Clayton LeungRhonda HenshawMikiko KohjitaniAndrew Bacon[ CELLO ]Colin Ryan 1 The Stuart & Winona Davis Principal Cello ChairSheila Laughton 2, 5Ronda Metszies 4Gillian CaldwellDerek GomezVictor PipkinJulie Amundsen[ DOUBLE BASS ]Jan Urke 1John Taylor 2Janice QuinnRhonda TaftRob Aldridge[ FLUTE ]Elizabeth Koch 1, 5Elizabeth Faulkner 3Shelley Younge 2 [ OBOE ]Lidia Khaner 1 Paul Schieman 2 The Steven & Day LePoole Assistant Principal Oboe Chair[ CLARiNET ]Charles Hudelson, Principal EmeritusJulianne Scott 1David Quinn 2[ BASSOON ]William Harrison 1Edith Stacey 2[ HORN ]Allene Hackleman 1, 5Megan Evans 3Gerald Onciul 2Donald Plumb 2[ TRUMPET ]Alvin Lowrey, Principal EmeritusRobin Doyon 1William Dimmer 2 [ TROMBONE ]John McPherson 1Katherine Macintosh 2[ BASS TROMBONE ]Christopher Taylor 1[ TUBA ]Scott Whetham 1[ TiMPANi ]Barry Nemish 1[ PERCUSSiON ]Brian Jones 1[ HARP ]Nora Bumanis 11 PrinciPal2 assistant PrinciPal3 acting PrinciPal4 acting assistant PrinciPal5 On leaveEric Filpula, Orchestra Personnel ManagerThe following musicians may appear at performances in this issue:Aaron Au ViolinAlycia Au ViolinRaymond Baril SaxophoneJim Cockell ViolinPetar Dundjerski FluteMary Fearon HornJoel Gray TrumpetMatthew Howatt BassoonLeanne Maitland ViolaMichael Massey KeyboardsJohn McCormick PercussionRaj Nigam PercussionJean-Franois Picard SaxophoneShamilla Ramnawaj HornBrian Sand TrumpetYukari Sasada BassJeremy Spurgeon OrganAlison Stewart ViolinMicajah Sturgess HornDan Sutherland ClarinetKate Svrcek ViolinBrian Thurgood PercussionDan Waldron OboeJoanne Yu CelloORCHESTRA PERSONNEL munity support of both organizations.A native of Montral, Annemarie is a graduate of McGill University where she majored in French Horn Performance. Following several years in Europe, she returned to Canada and stepped into the role of General Manager of Symphony New Brunswick. Work at the National Arts Centre Orchestra was followed by the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, where she also oversaw the popular Winnipeg New Music Festival. She joined the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra and Winspear Centre in 2007.Annemaries profound love of the arts has been her guide in a career focused on every aspect of the concert experience from international orches-tral tours to concerts in curling rinks in Canadas North. She is fuelled by the belief that participation in live music is essential to our well-being and is driven to make it accessible to everyone. Annemarie is a frequent guest speaker at arts industry conferences and has served on the board of Orchestras Canada.nnemarie petrov, Executive Director of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra (ESO) and Francis Winspear Centre for Music, brings more than 25 years of experience to a role that oversees one of Albertas flagship performing ensembles and one of the worlds premier concert halls.With a combined annual budget of over $12 million, Annemarie supervises day-to-day operations, long-term plan-ning, government relations and com-AMusic Directorartistic & leadership teamUri Mayer, Robert Rival, William Eddins,SiGNATURE SEPTEMBER/NOVEMBER 2013Signature1_2013_p06-07.indd 7 9/6/13 12:02:29 PMAartistic & leadership team Photo: Michael WoolleyPhoto: Michael WoolleySO Concertmaster RobeRt Uchida has been hailed for his ravishing sound, eloquence and hypnotic intensity (Strings magazine). He enjoys a varied career as a soloist, chamber musician, concertmaster and educator. His performances across North America and Europe have been received with great critical ac-claim. Mr. Uchida previously served as Concert-master of Symphony Nova Scotia and Associate Concertmaster of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, and has acted as Guest Concertmas-ter for the Netherlands Radio Chamber Phil-harmonic, Royal Flemish Philharmonic, and the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. He has worked as concertmaster with many of the worlds top conductors, including Valery Gergiev, Kurt Masur, Edo de Waart, and Pinchas Zukerman. In recent years he has been a featured soloist with several of Canadas orchestras including the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Orches-tre de la Francophonie, Ottawa Symphony, Symphony Nova Scotia, and Symphony New Brunswick. His recital and chamber music performances have included prestigious venues including Lincoln Center (New York), Muziekgebouw (Amsterdam), and the Glenn Gould Studio (Toronto). He has been a guest violinist at a number of Canadian festivals and chamber music series.An advocate of new music, Robert Uchida has worked with many composers including John Corigliano and Richard Danielpour, and has given premieres of works by Tim Brady, John Frantzen, Augusta Read-Thomas, Scott Wollschleger, and recorded the premiere of the Sonata for Solo Violin by Andrew Violette for Innova Records. Robert has held teaching positions at Acadia University, the Manhattan School of Music Pre-College, and the National Arts Centres Young Artist Program. He is Ar-tistic Director of the Acadia Summer Strings Festival in Wolfville and is frequently invited to give masterclasses at schools across the country. Mr. Uchida performs on a Lorenzo Ventapane violin made in Naples, Italy, in 1820, bows by Peccatte and Sartory, and a baroque bow by Max Kasper. He currently lives in Edmonton with his wife Laura and their two children.Estudio at his home in Minneapolis, where he lives with his wife Jen (a clarinetist), and their sons Raef and Riley.While conducting has been his principal pursuit, he continues to perform as pianist, organist and harpsichordist. He has conducted the ESO from the keyboard on many occasions, and in 2007, joined then-ESO concertmaster Martin Riseley and cellist Yo-Yo Ma in Brahmss Piano Trio No. 1 at a gala concert celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Winspear Centre. In 2008, he conducted Gershwins Porgy and Bess for Opra Lyon, leading to repeat performances in Lyon, London, and at the Edinburgh International Festival in 2010. Other international highlights include a 2009 tour of South Africa, where Bill conducted three gala concerts with soprano Rene Fleming and the KwaZulu-Natal Philharmonic Orchestra. On May 8, 2012, Bill made his Carnegie Hall debut conducting the ESO at a memorable concert featuring four Canadian soloists, and music by three Canadian composers alongside Martins rarely-performed Symphony No. 1. ow in his eighth season as Music Director of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, William eddins has a captivating energy, a magnetic stage presence, and an adventurous musical curiosity that continues to propel the orchestra to unique, new and exciting achievements. His commitment to the entire spectrum of the ESO audience brings him to the podium for performances in every subscription series, as well as for a wide variety of galas and specials. A distinguished and versatile pianist, Bill was bitten by the conducting bug while in his sophomore year at the Eastman School of Music. In 1989, he began conducting studies at the University of Southern California with Daniel Lewis, and Assistant Conductorships with both the Minnesota Orchestra and the Chicago Symphony (the latter under the leadership of Daniel Barenboim) followed.Bill has many non-musical hobbies including cooking, eating, discussing food and planning dinner parties. He is also quite fond of biking, tennis, reading and pinball. He recently completed building a state-of-the-art recording NPhoto: Michael WoolleyPhoto: Michael Woolleysignature www.edmontonsymphony.comSignature1_2013_p06-07.indd 6 9/6/13 12:01:48 PMFFEATUREFEATUREBE Afr Aid : German organist Mathias Rehfeldt appears on Halloween.HE Knows tHE scorEA German organist resurrects a famous silent film with his sinister serenadeBY sHEllEY williAmsonorror film aficionados will appreciate the feature performance October 31 by German organist and composer Mathias Rehfeldt, as he accompanies a special re-release of the 1922 F.W. Murnau picture, Nosferatu at the Francis Winspear Centre for Music.An unauthorized silent movie version of Bram Stokers novel Dracula, it was once believed all copies of Nosferatu had been destroyed following litigation initiated by Stokers widow. But a copy survived and was restored by a German film company, with the names changed and will play alongside Rehfeldts suitably sinister solo on the Davis Concert Organ.The son of organist Wolfram Rehfeldt, Mathias comes by his aptitude honestly, though the junior performer says it was only after his parents stopped encouraging him to play that he nurtured his musical talent. I really started playing piano and organ at age 17 because my parents gave up. And then I realized I actually like it, so I started practising and I found out this is actually what I want to do in life music, because its the only thing I thought I could do well, he says.Scoring for film was a logical leap, he explains, listing his top three loves as music, movies and technology. The Munich resident says the most challenging part of the Halloween Nosferatu performance will be adjusting to the eight-hour time difference on his first trip to Edmonton, but he adds that he looks forward to making his Canadian debut at the Winspear.Hsignature www.edmontonsymphony.comSignature1_2013_p08-09.indd 8 9/6/13 12:03:22 PM2013/2014 SEASONThough Rehfeldt grew up in Germany, American film music composers have long inspired his work and studies, he says. Film music is more seen as a functional thing, which I think is wrong because we have great composers in film music like John Williams theyre really inventing new stuff. Williams is known for such memorable scores as Jaws, Star Wars, and Schindlers List.Wanting to evade influence from the celebrated films previous scores, he says he avoided listening to any prior to his recital. Rehfeldt hopes the result will be a performance that sends chills through the audience. I am trying to feature the organ a little bit to produce sounds that are not that common. Im trying to use some new composition techniques. The 26-year-old, who studied church music in his native Rothenberg and who continues to pursue an undergraduate degree in Munich, first played his live score to Nosferatu while on a scholarship to Valparaiso University in Indiana back in 2010. He said the request had originally been made of fellow organist, Wolfgang Rubsam, who volunteered him. Soon after, his posting of a YouTube video of his music alongside the film attracted the Winspears interest. It was his unique style and fearlessness to put his music out there that first attracted the ESOs eyes and ears, says Artistic Administrator Rob McAlear. Its not the first time the facility has extended an invitation based on an online recording; in fact, its becoming more standard practice to be able to see and hear performers before meeting them in person, McAlear says.In the same way that we discovered the exciting young American organist, Cameron Carpenter, whom we have presented on several occasions, Rehfeldt posted a compelling and exciting YouTube post, containing music from his Nosferatu score, explains McAlear. It came to our attention, and we, and Bill Eddins (ESO musical director, himself an organist) were all very impressed.Carpenter was featured in a similarly eerie recital last Halloween, when he improvised with the silent film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari to an amazing response from the folks at the Winspear.Despite his young age, Rehfeldt is far from nervous at the prospect of presenting organ music for 90 minutes in front of a live audience. I get more nervous if I play literature. Its defined. A wrong note is a wrong note. Theres no discussion about that, he says. But in improv, you get what you play and something will just emerge or come out of it. It depends more on how you feel when you do it, and there is nothing particularly wrong in it.That his music accompanies the film adds an extra degree of difficulty, but its one he embraces, he says. I will try to show the two story lines, two general moods. Theres a love story between the main character and his wife, Nina, and the story of Nosferatu so I will try to bring this together in the music, says Rehfeldt, who promises to have something in his back pocket to delight the audience. I will try to show the two story lines, two general moods, Mathias Rehfeldt says. Theres a love story between the main character and his wife, Nina, and the story of Nosferatu so I will try to bring this together in the music, He Knows tHe scoreThursday, October 31 9:30 pmThe Edmonton Symphony Orchestra & Winspear Centre presentNOSfEraTu, EiNE SymphONiE dES GrauENS(NOSfEraTu, a SymphONy Of hOrrOr)with mathias rehfeldtDavis Concert OrganprOGram*Clair de lune (Karg-Elert)Toccata and fugue in d minor, BWV 565 (J.S. Bach)danse agni yavishta (Alain)Witches dance from Symphony No. 2 (Rehfeldt)Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (Rehfeldt)accompaniment to silent film while the movie is presented above the stage*Note: this performance does not feature the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, and lasts about 80 minutes, with no intermission.Tickets on sale now at the Winspear Centre Box Office (780-428-1414) and WinspearCentre.comStill from Nosferatu used with permission.september/November 2013 sigNature Signature1_2013_p08-09.indd 9 9/10/13 1:50:24 PMFFEATUREFEATUREBE Afr Aid : German organist Mathias Rehfeldt appears on Halloween.HE Knows tHE scorEA German organist resurrects a famous silent film with his sinister serenadeBY sHEllEY williAmsonorror film aficionados will appreciate the feature performance October 31 by German organist and composer Mathias Rehfeldt, as he accompanies a special re-release of the 1922 F.W. Murnau picture, Nosferatu at the Francis Winspear Centre for Music.An unauthorized silent movie version of Bram Stokers novel Dracula, it was once believed all copies of Nosferatu had been destroyed following litigation initiated by Stokers widow. But a copy survived and was restored by a German film company, with the names changed and will play alongside Rehfeldts suitably sinister solo on the Davis Concert Organ.The son of organist Wolfram Rehfeldt, Mathias comes by his aptitude honestly, though the junior performer says it was only after his parents stopped encouraging him to play that he nurtured his musical talent. I really started playing piano and organ at age 17 because my parents gave up. And then I realized I actually like it, so I started practising and I found out this is actually what I want to do in life music, because its the only thing I thought I could do well, he says.Scoring for film was a logical leap, he explains, listing his top three loves as music, movies and technology. The Munich resident says the most challenging part of the Halloween Nosferatu performance will be adjusting to the eight-hour time difference on his first trip to Edmonton, but he adds that he looks forward to making his Canadian debut at the Winspear.Hsignature www.edmontonsymphony.comSignature1_2013_p08-09.indd 8 9/6/13 12:03:22 PMMJean-Phiippe Tremblay, conductorSerhiy Salov, pianoCHANDELConcerto grosso in D Major, Op.3 No. 6 (7)* Vivace AllegroBEETHOVENPiano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat Major, Op.73 Emperor (38)* Allegro Adagiounpocomosso Rondo:AllegroINTERMISSION(20 minutes)MOZARTSymphony No. 41 in C Major, K.551 Jupiter (30)* Allegrovivace Andantecantabile Menuetto:Allegretto MoltoallegroProgram subject to change*indicates approximate performance durationanadian conductor Jean-PhiliPPe Tremblay has an impressive track record. In 2001, Pinchas Zukerman, Artistic Director of the National Arts Centre Orchestra, named him Assistant Conductor, a position he held for two years. Artistic Director and Founder of the Orchestre de la Francophonie (OF) in 2001, he has given more than 200 concerts across Canada with his ensemble. In December 2006, Mr. Tremblay and the OF embarked on their first tour to China, giving 17 concerts that included two live TV broadcasts. In recent seasons, he has conducted in Europe the Philharmonia in London, Orchestre National de France in Paris, Staatska-pelle in Dresden, and the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra in Utrecht. In North America, he has been guest conductor with the Montral Symphony, the Winnipeg Symphony, Orchestra London, the National Ballet of Canada Orchestra, the NAC Orchestra in Ottawa, the Manhattan School of Music Orchestra and the Philharmonic Orchestra of the Americas. Mr. Tremblay conducted the inaugural concert of the Royal Conservatory of Musics Koerner Hall in Toronto (2009), as well as the Sofia Philharmonic, the Simn Bolvar Symphony Orchestra (Venezuela), the National Orchestra of Spain, the Orchestre symphonique de Qubec, the London Chamber, and the Chinese Philharmonic Orchestra for the inauguration of the 2010 Worlds Fair in Shanghai. Jean-Philippe Tremblay studied viola, composition and con-ducting at the Conservatoire de musique du Qubec in Chicoutimi, followed by advanced studies in conducting at the Universit de Montral, the Royal Academy of Music in London, the Pierre Monteux School, and a fellowship at the prestigious Tanglewood Music Center. He won the Musicians Prize at the 2002 Mitropoulos International Competition for Orchestral Conduct-ing (Greece). In 2004/05, he was selected by Kurt Masur and Christoph von Dohnanyi as one of three participants in the Allianz Cultural Foundations conductor mentoring program with the London Philharmonic Orchestra.Mr. Tremblay last appeared with the ESO in March 2012. A R T I S T B I O SARTIST BIOS2013/2014 SEASONMIDWEEK CLASSICSHandel, Mozart & BeethovenWednesday, September 18 | 7 : 3 0 P MSIgNATuRE www.edmontonSymphony.com10Signature1_2013_p10-12.indd 10 9/6/13 12:05:14 PMConcerto grosso in D Major, Op.3 No. 6GeorGe Frideric Handel(b. Halle, 1685 / d. London, 1759)The six works that make up Op.3 were published in 1734.This is the ESO premiere of the pieceets oF concerti Grossi, publisHed in nice, neat editions of six or 12 at a time were, to put it nicely, money-makers during the ba-roque. The composer made royalties on the sales, and the publisher could turn a nice profit too. It was the set of 12 such works by Arcangelo Corelli that got the ball rolling, and when his set became a major success, publishers all over Europe were quick to jump on the bandwagon. And thats precisely what John Walsh did. In December 1734, Walsh published a set of six concerti grossi by the esteemed George Frideric Handel of London. The problem is, while Walsh was in fact Handels publisher (and his friend), he published the set without really discussing it with Handel himself.The result was a bit of a mish-mash of works that Handel likely didnt even consider to be actual concerti grossi at all. This in part explains the wildly divergent nature of so many of the individual works in the set. Concerto grosso No. 6, for example (the one well hear tonight) was published as a pair of movements (the standard would have been three or four movements), one of which was a piece Handel had used 11 years before in his opera Ottone. None of this, of course, makes the slightest difference in the enjoyable, very convivial nature of the concerto grosso. The work we will hear tonight is in two lively and brief movements the second of which features a prominent part for organ will make a perfect curtain-raiser for this evenings concert.Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat Major, Op.73 EmperorludwiG van beetHoven(b. Bonn, 1770 / d. Vienna, 1827)First performance: November 28, 1811 in ViennaLast ESO performance: November 2009He occupation oF vienna by napoleons army in 1809 took a spiritual as well as physical toll on Beethoven. He took refuge with his brother Kaspar, and on those occasions when cannon fire could be heard, he covered his head with a pillow, protecting his nearly-deaf but still highly-sensitive ears. Following the Treaty of Viennas signing in October, when life began to return to normal, Beethovens pent-up artistic soul gave vent to an outpouring of music. He finished his Op.74 String Quartet, the Les Adieux Piano Sonata, and his Fifth Piano Concerto. It is no coincidence that all of these works are scored in E-flat Major, a key which, for Beethoven, had heroic or triumphant connota-tions (it is also the key of his Heroic Third Symphony). According to a report, it was a French soldier in the audience at the works premiere who proclaimed the concerto to be the Emperor of concertos, and the name has stuck.The works unconventional opening was likely an unexpected move for the erHiy salov was born in Donetsk, Ukraine. It was there that his musical training began, extending well beyond the technique of the piano to composition, improvisation, and the multiple disciplines of mu-sicology. Mr. Salov gave his first public concert at age 11, and his first solo recital a year later at the Philharmonia Hall of Donetsk. At age 15, he left for Germany to study at the Freiburg Musik Hochschule. After graduation, he moved to London for another four years to complete a masters degree at the famed Guildhall School of Music and Drama. He has a wide ranging performing experience, and has performed with major orchestras such as the Montral, Salt Lake City, Hall, Tokyo, and Berlin Symphonies, lOrchestre National de Radio France, the Philharmonia, Royal Philharmonic, and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic. Serhiy Salov has won many awards and Prizes. He has garnered three international First Prizes on the piano competition circuit (Dudley 2000, pinal 2001 and Montral 2004), one second (Gina Bachauer 2010), and three thirds, as well as Audience Prizes in Montral and Tromso. Mr. Salov has become an avid champion of arrangement for the solo piano of some of the orchestral repertoires seminal works. He is one of the very few pianists to arrange, interpret and record his own version of Stravinskys The Rite of Spring. Mr. Salovs first commercial CD, Shostakovichs Circle (Analekta, 2007), showcasing the highly sophisticated albeit rarely performed piano concertos by the masters acolytes Galynin and Ustvolskaya, received the Prix Opus for best classical recording of the year. His most recent CD, The Sacred Spring of Slavs (Analekta, 2010), was released to great public and critical acclaim, due in large part to his glorious transcription of Stravinskys aforementioned masterpiece.This is Mr. Salovs debut with the ESO.SSP R O G R A M N O T E SPROGRAM NOTESTPhoto: Irene ZandelSiGNATuRE 11SEPTEMbER/NOvEMbER 2013Signature1_2013_p10-12.indd 11 9/6/13 12:05:53 PMMJean-Phiippe Tremblay, conductorSerhiy Salov, pianoCHANDELConcerto grosso in D Major, Op.3 No. 6 (7)* Vivace AllegroBEETHOVENPiano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat Major, Op.73 Emperor (38)* Allegro Adagiounpocomosso Rondo:AllegroINTERMISSION(20 minutes)MOZARTSymphony No. 41 in C Major, K.551 Jupiter (30)* Allegrovivace Andantecantabile Menuetto:Allegretto MoltoallegroProgram subject to change*indicates approximate performance durationanadian conductor Jean-PhiliPPe Tremblay has an impressive track record. In 2001, Pinchas Zukerman, Artistic Director of the National Arts Centre Orchestra, named him Assistant Conductor, a position he held for two years. Artistic Director and Founder of the Orchestre de la Francophonie (OF) in 2001, he has given more than 200 concerts across Canada with his ensemble. In December 2006, Mr. Tremblay and the OF embarked on their first tour to China, giving 17 concerts that included two live TV broadcasts. In recent seasons, he has conducted in Europe the Philharmonia in London, Orchestre National de France in Paris, Staatska-pelle in Dresden, and the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra in Utrecht. In North America, he has been guest conductor with the Montral Symphony, the Winnipeg Symphony, Orchestra London, the National Ballet of Canada Orchestra, the NAC Orchestra in Ottawa, the Manhattan School of Music Orchestra and the Philharmonic Orchestra of the Americas. Mr. Tremblay conducted the inaugural concert of the Royal Conservatory of Musics Koerner Hall in Toronto (2009), as well as the Sofia Philharmonic, the Simn Bolvar Symphony Orchestra (Venezuela), the National Orchestra of Spain, the Orchestre symphonique de Qubec, the London Chamber, and the Chinese Philharmonic Orchestra for the inauguration of the 2010 Worlds Fair in Shanghai. Jean-Philippe Tremblay studied viola, composition and con-ducting at the Conservatoire de musique du Qubec in Chicoutimi, followed by advanced studies in conducting at the Universit de Montral, the Royal Academy of Music in London, the Pierre Monteux School, and a fellowship at the prestigious Tanglewood Music Center. He won the Musicians Prize at the 2002 Mitropoulos International Competition for Orchestral Conduct-ing (Greece). In 2004/05, he was selected by Kurt Masur and Christoph von Dohnanyi as one of three participants in the Allianz Cultural Foundations conductor mentoring program with the London Philharmonic Orchestra.Mr. Tremblay last appeared with the ESO in March 2012. A R T I S T B I O SARTIST BIOS2013/2014 SEASONMIDWEEK CLASSICSHandel, Mozart & BeethovenWednesday, September 18 | 7 : 3 0 P MSIgNATuRE www.edmontonSymphony.com10Signature1_2013_p10-12.indd 10 9/6/13 12:05:14 PMdeath seven weeks shy of his 36th birthday, and while it was not Mozart who chose the epithet Jupiter for his last symphony, this Olympian work is a worthy final effort.Mozart both looks back to the past, and anticipates the future in his 41st Symphony. His use of counterpoint in the opening and final movements is certainly a tribute to composers such as Bach, while his ability to create towering musical structures from minimal musical building blocks is something Beethoven and others picked up on years later.There are no less than three separate musical ideas in the very opening of the work quite uncharacteristic of proper sonata-allegro form. Similarly, there are three thematic ideas in the Andante cantabile second movement two serene ones separated by a tense, dramatic emotional one.A slightly more conventional third movement balances a lyrical Minuet with two starkly contrasting trio subjects. The final movement, rather than a jovial trot to the finish line, is instead a towering musical structure, where contrasting themes are lined up, harnessed, and sent galloping down the final stretch in one of the most glorious, tingling, and overwhelming passages in music, wrote longtime New York Times critic Harold C. Schoenberg. Program notes 2013 by D.T. BakerMaudience to hear: after a declamatory E-flat Major chord in the orchestra, the piano make its entrance with an extended series of arpeggios. The orchestra then states the main first theme, answered boldly by piano. A second theme is also developed, and through the rest of the movement, each of these main ideas is explored thoroughly. The vast movement nears its end with a cadenza written out note-for-note by Beethoven.The second movement is divided between two themes. The first is a quiet one for the strings as simple and as beautiful as any melody Beethoven ever wrote. The piano enters, also quietly, with its own theme. Variations of these melodies make up the movement until, with a subtle drop of a semi-tone, the principal theme of the third movement is at first tentatively presented, then banged out joyously on piano, answered with equal exuberance by the orchestra. Listen toward the end of this happy conclusion, when the piano shares a rare duet with the timpani, leading to the rousing finish.Symphony No. 41 in C Major, K.551 JupiterWolfgang amad mozart(b. Salzburg, 1756 / d. Vienna, 1791)Composition completed August 10, 1788. It is not known if the work was ever performed during Mozarts lifetime.Last ESO performance: October 2011ozart Wrote his last symphony more than three years before he died, and it is highly likely he felt that he would write more. But the fact remains that other projects occupied him until his 2013/2014 SEASONMidweeK ClaSSiCS Handel, Mozart & BeethovenSignature1_2013_p10-12.indd 12 9/6/13 12:06:39 PMR2013/2014 SEASONROBBINS POPSLeading Men of Broadway A R T I S T B I O SFriday & Saturday, September 20 & 21 | 8 P MJPhoto: Peter ThromMusic of the Night (from The Phantom of the Opera) Lloyd Webber/HartMedley from Les MisrablesSchnberg/Boublil (arr. Barker)Program subject to changeack EvErly is the Principal Pops Conductor of the Baltimore and Indianapolis Symphony Orches-tras, the Naples Philharmonic, and the National Arts Centre Orchestra. He is also Music Director of the National Memorial Day Concert and A Capitol Fourth on PBS. Last season he made his Los Angeles Philharmonic debut at the Hollywood Bowl, returned to The Cleveland Orchestra and appears as guest conductor in Pittsburgh, and the New York Pops at Carnegie Hall. Originally appointed by Mikhail Baryshnikov, Mr. Everly was conductor of the American Ballet Theatre for 14 years, where he served as Music Director. In addition to his ABT tenure, he has teamed with Marvin Hamlisch in Broadway shows that Mr. Hamlisch scored including, The Goodbye Girl, Theyre Playing Our Song, and A Chorus Line. He conducted Carol Channing hundreds of times in Hello, Dolly! in two separate Broadway productions. Mr. Everly has conducted the songs for Disneys animated classic, The Hunch-back of Notre Dame, and led the Czech Philharmonic on the recordings: In the Presence, featuring tenor Daniel Rodriguez and Sandi Pattys 2011 release Broadway Stories. He also conducted the critically praised Everythings Coming Up Roses: The Complete Overtures of Broadways Jule Styne, and was music director for numerous Broadway cast recordings. In 1998, Jack Everly created the Sym-phonic Pops Consortium, serving as Music Director. The Consortium, based in Indianapolis, produces a new theatrical pops program each season. Over the past 15 years, more than 225 performances of SPC programs have taken place across the U.S. and Canada, including Mysterioso: Music, Magic & Mayhem. Mae-stro Everly holds an Honorary Doctorate of Arts from Franklin College in his home state of Indiana. When not on the podium or arranging, Maestro Everly indulges in his love for films, Hagen-Dazs and a pooch named Max. Mr. Everly last appeared with the ESO in February 2013.Pops Prelude, 7:15 pm Friday & Saturday, Upper Circle (Third Level) Lobby with D.T. BakerOverturevarious (arr. Everly)Man of La Mancha (from Man of La Mancha) Leigh/Darion (arr. Hinchey)Maria (from West Side Story)Bernstein/SondheimSelections from Oliver!Bart (arr. Reed)This is the Moment (from Jekyll & Hyde) Wildhorn/BricusseLe Jazz Hot (from Victor/Victoria)Mancini/Bricusse (arr. Stephenson)Leading Men Medleyvarious (arr. Everly)INTERMISSION (20 minutes)Seventy-Six Trombones (from The Music Man) Willson (arr. Hayman)Ya Got Trouble (from The Music Man) WillsonLove Duet Medleyvarious (arr. Barker)Overture to West Side StoryBernstein (arr. Peress)I Am What I Am (from La Cage aux Folles) Herman (arr. Hinchey)Jack Everly, conductorTed Keegan, Hayden Tee, Richard Todd Adams, & Kathy Voytko, vocalistsStrathcona Theatre Company male ensemble Linette Smith & Stephen Delano, Artistic Directorswith: Steve Hanna, drumsARTIST BIOSMedia SponsorSeries SponsorBill & Mary Jo RobbinsMedia Sponsor Media Sponsor Media Sponsor Guest artists bios can be found in the Robbins Pops insert.signature 13september/November 2013Signature1_2013_p13-14.indd 13 2013-09-06 12:35 PMdeath seven weeks shy of his 36th birthday, and while it was not Mozart who chose the epithet Jupiter for his last symphony, this Olympian work is a worthy final effort.Mozart both looks back to the past, and anticipates the future in his 41st Symphony. His use of counterpoint in the opening and final movements is certainly a tribute to composers such as Bach, while his ability to create towering musical structures from minimal musical building blocks is something Beethoven and others picked up on years later.There are no less than three separate musical ideas in the very opening of the work quite uncharacteristic of proper sonata-allegro form. Similarly, there are three thematic ideas in the Andante cantabile second movement two serene ones separated by a tense, dramatic emotional one.A slightly more conventional third movement balances a lyrical Minuet with two starkly contrasting trio subjects. The final movement, rather than a jovial trot to the finish line, is instead a towering musical structure, where contrasting themes are lined up, harnessed, and sent galloping down the final stretch in one of the most glorious, tingling, and overwhelming passages in music, wrote longtime New York Times critic Harold C. Schoenberg. Program notes 2013 by D.T. BakerMaudience to hear: after a declamatory E-flat Major chord in the orchestra, the piano make its entrance with an extended series of arpeggios. The orchestra then states the main first theme, answered boldly by piano. A second theme is also developed, and through the rest of the movement, each of these main ideas is explored thoroughly. The vast movement nears its end with a cadenza written out note-for-note by Beethoven.The second movement is divided between two themes. The first is a quiet one for the strings as simple and as beautiful as any melody Beethoven ever wrote. The piano enters, also quietly, with its own theme. Variations of these melodies make up the movement until, with a subtle drop of a semi-tone, the principal theme of the third movement is at first tentatively presented, then banged out joyously on piano, answered with equal exuberance by the orchestra. Listen toward the end of this happy conclusion, when the piano shares a rare duet with the timpani, leading to the rousing finish.Symphony No. 41 in C Major, K.551 JupiterWolfgang amad mozart(b. Salzburg, 1756 / d. Vienna, 1791)Composition completed August 10, 1788. It is not known if the work was ever performed during Mozarts lifetime.Last ESO performance: October 2011ozart Wrote his last symphony more than three years before he died, and it is highly likely he felt that he would write more. But the fact remains that other projects occupied him until his 2013/2014 SEASONMidweeK ClaSSiCS Handel, Mozart & BeethovenSignature1_2013_p10-12.indd 12 9/6/13 12:06:39 PM2013/2014 SERobbins pops Leading Men of broadwayTed KeeganSTraThcona TheaTre companyKaThy VoyTKorichard Todd adamSMAINSTAGE 2013CONCERTS 2014University of Alberta | Department of MusicLA BELLE POQUESept. 20 at 8 pm | Convocation HallFaculty perform french melodies by Ravel, Faur, Debussy and othersTHREE CENTURIES OF PIANO TRIO MASTERPIECESSept. 28 at 8 pm | Convocation Hall5SJP7PDFQFSGPSNT.P[BSU5SJPJO#BUmajor, K. 502, Ravel Trio, and Dvorak Trio No. 4 in E minorTICKETS: $10 STUDENT | $20 ADULT | $15 SENIOR AT WWW.YEGLIVE.CA AND THE DOORWWW.MUSIC.UALBERTA.CAMUSIC OF THE 21ST CENTURY FOR SAXOPHONE, ELECTRONICS & PIANOOct. 6 at 3 pm | Convocation HallFaculty perform new classicsgueST arTiSTS:hayden Tee www.edmontonSymphony.comSignature1_2013_p13-14.indd 14 9/6/13 2:02:03 PML2013/2014 SEASONLandmark Classic Masters SponsorSpanish SymphonyLandmark CLassiC mastersSaturday, September 28 | 8 P MWilliam eddins, conductorelmar Oliveira, violinSymphony Prelude, 7:15 pm Upper Circle (Third Level) Lobby with d.t. BakerestaCiOIl faut danser la vie (13)*aLBniZSuite espaola (arr. Frhbeck de Burgos) (37)* Castilla (Seguidillas) Asturias (Leyenda) Aragn (Fantasia) Cdiz (Cancion) Sevilla (Sevillanas) Granada (Serenata) Catalua (Corranda) CordobaINTERMISSION (20 minutes)LaLOSymphonie espagnole in D minor, Op.21 (35)* Allegro non troppo Scherzando: Allegro molto Intermezzo: Allegro non troppo Andante Rondo: AllegroProgram subject to change*indicates approximate performance durationE lmar Oliveira is one of the most distinguished violinists in the world today. Mr. Oliveiras international itinerary includes appearances with many of the worlds great orchestras, including the Boston Sym-phony, Buffalo Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, Cleveland Orchestra, Colorado Symphony, Detroit Symphony, Helsinki Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewand-haus, London Philharmonic, Los Angeles Philharmonic, New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, Rochester Philhar-monic, Saint Louis Symphony, San Francisco Symphony, Seattle Symphony, and the Zurich Tonhalle, to name a few. A prodigious recording artist, Elmar Oliveiras discography on Artek, Angel, SONY Masterworks, Vox, Delos, IMP, Naxos, Ondine, and Melodiya covers a wide range of works. His best-selling recording of the Rautavaara Violin Concerto (Ondine) won a Cannes Classical Award and has appeared on Gramophones Editors Choice and other Best Recordings lists around the world. He was also a Grammy nominee for his CD of the Barber Violin Concerto.Mr. Oliveira has premiered works by such distinguished composers as Morton Gould, Aaron Kernis, Ezra Laderman, Benjamin Lees, Andrzej Panufnik, Krysztof Penderecki, Joan Tower and Charles Wuorinen. He remains the only American violinist to win the Gold Medal at Moscows prestigious Tchaikovsky International Competition, was First Prize win-ner at the Naumburg International Competition and the first violinist to receive the coveted Avery Fisher Prize. The son of Portuguese immigrants, Mr. Oliveira was nine when he began studying the violin. He continued his studies with Ariana Bronne and Raphael Bronstein at the Hartt College of Music and the Manhattan School of Music, where Mr. Oliveira received an honorary doctorate. Other honors include an honorary doctorate from Binghamton University and the Order of Santiago, Portugals highest civilian honour. Elmar Oliveira is a Distinguished Artist in Residence at the Lynn University Conservatory of Music in Boca Raton, Florida. He performs on a 1729/30 Guarneri del Gesu called the Stretton, and on several outstanding contemporary violins.Mr. Oliveira last appeared with the ESO in November 2010.Mr. Eddinss bio can be found on page 6.Program notes are on page 16.A R T I S T B I O Sartist BiOsPhoto: Tucker Densleysignature 15septemBer/nOvemBer 2013Signature1_2013_p15-17.indd 15 9/6/13 12:10:15 PM2013/2014 SERobbins pops Leading Men of broadwayTed KeeganSTraThcona TheaTre companyKaThy VoyTKorichard Todd adamSMAINSTAGE 2013CONCERTS 2014University of Alberta | Department of MusicLA BELLE POQUESept. 20 at 8 pm | Convocation HallFaculty perform french melodies by Ravel, Faur, Debussy and othersTHREE CENTURIES OF PIANO TRIO MASTERPIECESSept. 28 at 8 pm | Convocation Hall5SJP7PDFQFSGPSNT.P[BSU5SJPJO#BUmajor, K. 502, Ravel Trio, and Dvorak Trio No. 4 in E minorTICKETS: $10 STUDENT | $20 ADULT | $15 SENIOR AT WWW.YEGLIVE.CA AND THE DOORWWW.MUSIC.UALBERTA.CAMUSIC OF THE 21ST CENTURY FOR SAXOPHONE, ELECTRONICS & PIANOOct. 6 at 3 pm | Convocation HallFaculty perform new classicsgueST arTiSTS:hayden Tee www.edmontonSymphony.comSignature1_2013_p13-14.indd 14 9/6/13 2:02:03 PM2013/2014 SEASONorchestra, changing around the order of the movements in the process. The orchestral suite opens with a Castilian Seguidilla, a traditional song type in which sung portions alternate with guitar solos. The famous Leyenda from the Asturias region is best-known as one of the most popular works for classical guitar. The Fantasia inspired by the Aragn region is in an A-B-A format, in which a rhythmic dance frames a slower central section. Cancion is the Spanish word for song, and the Cdiz song here has a religious fervour to it.To Seville next for a flamenco-style dance named for that city, followed by a graceful Serenata, in which the orchestral strings strum guitar-like, accompanying the song from Granada. The Corranda is a Spanish version of the French court dance the courante, in 3/2 time. The suite concludes with music from the Cordoba region.Symphonie espagnole in D minor, Op.21douard LaLo(b. Lille, 1823 / d. Paris, 1892)First performed: February 7, 1875 in ParisLast ESO performance: April 2005douard LaLos own famiLy had roots in spain, and the composer was also a fine professional violinist. Nevertheless, it was another Spanish violinist, esteemed virtuoso Pablo de Sarasate, for whom Lalo wrote his best-known work. After hearing Sarasate perform his First Violin Concerto, Lalo set about writing a work combining the soloists strengths with a work paying homage to their shared ancestral land. The violin in this work does not have the forcefulness of the great German concertos of Beethoven or Brahms; rather, it has an agility, grace, and lightness of tone - with much of the work in the violins upper register. While not a true concerto (nor a sym-phony, despite its name), the work has been a success since its 1875 premiere.Cast in an untraditional five-movement format (the third movement is sometimes omitted from performances), the Symphonie espagnole begins with a perfunctory orchestral opening, followed by a brief violin cameo, with a full, proper orchestral introduction, full of drama, following. The violin picks up this dark-hued dance as its principal material. A slower, more thoughtful idea is introduced by the violin, but only briefly as the whirling dance in 4/4 returns. But even as passages alternate between sprightly and reflective, the D minor mood never seems downcast; instead, it lends an earthy quality to the dancing. The next movement is a bright Scherzo-like movement, begins with pizzicato strings and a mischievous 3/8 dance similar to the Seguidilla Albniz used in his suite (see above), one which ends on a whisper. It is the works shortest movement, followed by an Intermezzo which alternates episodes in major and minor keys, playing up the dramatic contrast by placing the violins solos in stark relief above the orchestra, and featuring some of the works most virtuosic passages, and ending on a single, loud chord.The fourth movement is the works slow movement, a 3/4 Andante back in the works home key. Here, at last, we get a touch of something tragic in the stern orchestral opening, answered by the sad, impassioned song of the violin. The orchestral accompaniment is deftly handled, swelling up under the violin without overpowering it. The final movement is a rondo, introduced by a rhythmic and catchy repeated pattern almost an ostinato that ushers in the violins statement of the main rondo theme, now in the tonic major. That theme has the flavour of a folksong, but also serves as the springboard to a number of dazzling solo passages and a central section brimming with a triumphant and celebratory feel, and a gypsy-style dance in the solo violin. Program notes 2013 by D.T. Baker, except as notedIl faut danser la vieJohn Estacio(b. Newmarket, Ontario, 1966)First performed: March 2, 2004 in MontralThis is the ESO premiere of the pieceProgram note by the composer:y goaL was to crEatE a Joyous piEcE of music inspired by the free spirit that dwells within us all. I felt the urge to compose something that was bold, colourful, driven by infectious rhythms and, for the most part, unencumbered by seriousness. For the longest time I struggled with a title that could encompass my vision for this orchestral work; it wasnt until I serendipitously came across a forgotten bookmark in a borrowed book did I discover a suitable candidate. On this bookmark was a photograph of the renowned philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche and one of his famous quotes: Il faut danser la vie (life should be danced).A simple accompaniment pattern created by the harp, piano, and marimba begins the piece. The first of two themes is a capricious melody introduced by a solo flute. The second theme, played by a solo horn, attempts to be amorous despite the cheeky accompaniments in the woodwinds and strings. An aggressive development of the two themes ensues with the amiable mood of the piece suddenly shattered by boisterous syncopated rhythms from the brass. The once amorous second theme transforms into a wild waltz. The brass section eventually dominates the texture with a macabre but quasi majestic variation on the waltz theme. After a quiet, introspective solo on the English horn, the accompaniment pattern heard at the very start attempts to capture the equanimity of the opening. Eventually the capricious first theme makes a resplendent return, this time played by the strings.Suite espaola (arr. Frhbeck de Burgos)isaac aLbniz(b. Camprodn, Catalonia, 1860 / d. Cambole-Bains, Pyrenes, 1909)Suite first published in a four-movement piano version: 1887Five movements of the Frhbeck de Burgos arrangement were performed February 2004. Two movements from the same suite were performed in September 2010.chiLd prodigy of thE first ordEr, it was isaac aLbniz good fortune to have a customs official a man required to travel internationally a great deal as a father. By the age of 15, young Isaac had toured the world as a precociously gifted pianist. The tours earned him money and reputation, enough to allow him to study in Leipzig and Brussels, with teachers such as Franz Liszt and Felipe Pedrell. The latter, a musicologist as well as teacher, encouraged Albniz to infuse his music with the rhythms, dances, and folk tunes of his homeland.Originally only four movements long, the Suite espaola was composed for piano in 1886, and was one of the first pieces Albniz composed after studies with Pedrell. Albniz publisher later added movements from other works into an eight-movement piano suite published as Op.47. Each movement of the suite bears the name, and influence, of the music from various places in Spain. Spanish conductor Rafael Frhbeck de Burgos arranged the suite for MP R O G R A M N O T E SPROGRAM NOTESALanDmark CLaSSIC maSterS Spanish Symphony" ! "!! !!!!"!#Community support builds great hospitals and the Royal Alexandra Hospital Foundation receives generous donations, including bequests, from across Alberta and beyond.Bequests and planned gifts are an inspired way to help ensure that the Royal Alexandra Hospital has the resources it needs to provide exceptional and compassionate patient care when it matters most, now and in the future.This ad was generously donated by The Robbins Foundation Canada."..4+&*"-1"/0/*!(**"!/: "6+4(("3*!.+/,&0(+1*!0&+*"(",%+*"6)&(00+&*.+4(("3+.$7%"*4+1/1,,+.0%"(0% ."4+1/1,,+.00%""*0&." +))1*&04*!%"(,)*4,"+,("/+&02/$++! %+& "#+.)"0+*)"0%"+4(("3*!.+/,&0(/0%""*" &.4&*)4&((895&)&".5/"4+5'+*+.222.+4(("3+.$SiGNATuRE www.Edmontonsymphony.com16Signature1_2013_p15-17.indd 16 9/6/13 12:10:50 PM" ! "!! !!!!"!#Community support builds great hospitals and the Royal Alexandra Hospital Foundation receives generous donations, including bequests, from across Alberta and beyond.Bequests and planned gifts are an inspired way to help ensure that the Royal Alexandra Hospital has the resources it needs to provide exceptional and compassionate patient care when it matters most, now and in the future.This ad was generously donated by The Robbins Foundation Canada."..4+&*"-1"/0/*!(**"!/: "6+4(("3*!.+/,&0(+1*!0&+*"(",%+*"6)&(00+&*.+4(("3+.$7%"*4+1/1,,+.0%"(0% ."4+1/1,,+.00%""*0&." +))1*&04*!%"(,)*4,"+,("/+&02/$++! %+& "#+.)"0+*)"0%"+4(("3*!.+/,&0(/0%""*" &.4&*)4&((895&)&".5/"4+5'+*+.222.+4(("3+.$Signature1_2013_p15-17.indd 17 9/6/13 12:11:16 PM2013/2014 SEASONorchestra, changing around the order of the movements in the process. The orchestral suite opens with a Castilian Seguidilla, a traditional song type in which sung portions alternate with guitar solos. The famous Leyenda from the Asturias region is best-known as one of the most popular works for classical guitar. The Fantasia inspired by the Aragn region is in an A-B-A format, in which a rhythmic dance frames a slower central section. Cancion is the Spanish word for song, and the Cdiz song here has a religious fervour to it.To Seville next for a flamenco-style dance named for that city, followed by a graceful Serenata, in which the orchestral strings strum guitar-like, accompanying the song from Granada. The Corranda is a Spanish version of the French court dance the courante, in 3/2 time. The suite concludes with music from the Cordoba region.Symphonie espagnole in D minor, Op.21douard LaLo(b. Lille, 1823 / d. Paris, 1892)First performed: February 7, 1875 in ParisLast ESO performance: April 2005douard LaLos own famiLy had roots in spain, and the composer was also a fine professional violinist. Nevertheless, it was another Spanish violinist, esteemed virtuoso Pablo de Sarasate, for whom Lalo wrote his best-known work. After hearing Sarasate perform his First Violin Concerto, Lalo set about writing a work combining the soloists strengths with a work paying homage to their shared ancestral land. The violin in this work does not have the forcefulness of the great German concertos of Beethoven or Brahms; rather, it has an agility, grace, and lightness of tone - with much of the work in the violins upper register. While not a true concerto (nor a sym-phony, despite its name), the work has been a success since its 1875 premiere.Cast in an untraditional five-movement format (the third movement is sometimes omitted from performances), the Symphonie espagnole begins with a perfunctory orchestral opening, followed by a brief violin cameo, with a full, proper orchestral introduction, full of drama, following. The violin picks up this dark-hued dance as its principal material. A slower, more thoughtful idea is introduced by the violin, but only briefly as the whirling dance in 4/4 returns. But even as passages alternate between sprightly and reflective, the D minor mood never seems downcast; instead, it lends an earthy quality to the dancing. The next movement is a bright Scherzo-like movement, begins with pizzicato strings and a mischievous 3/8 dance similar to the Seguidilla Albniz used in his suite (see above), one which ends on a whisper. It is the works shortest movement, followed by an Intermezzo which alternates episodes in major and minor keys, playing up the dramatic contrast by placing the violins solos in stark relief above the orchestra, and featuring some of the works most virtuosic passages, and ending on a single, loud chord.The fourth movement is the works slow movement, a 3/4 Andante back in the works home key. Here, at last, we get a touch of something tragic in the stern orchestral opening, answered by the sad, impassioned song of the violin. The orchestral accompaniment is deftly handled, swelling up under the violin without overpowering it. The final movement is a rondo, introduced by a rhythmic and catchy repeated pattern almost an ostinato that ushers in the violins statement of the main rondo theme, now in the tonic major. That theme has the flavour of a folksong, but also serves as the springboard to a number of dazzling solo passages and a central section brimming with a triumphant and celebratory feel, and a gypsy-style dance in the solo violin. Program notes 2013 by D.T. Baker, except as notedIl faut danser la vieJohn Estacio(b. Newmarket, Ontario, 1966)First performed: March 2, 2004 in MontralThis is the ESO premiere of the pieceProgram note by the composer:y goaL was to crEatE a Joyous piEcE of music inspired by the free spirit that dwells within us all. I felt the urge to compose something that was bold, colourful, driven by infectious rhythms and, for the most part, unencumbered by seriousness. For the longest time I struggled with a title that could encompass my vision for this orchestral work; it wasnt until I serendipitously came across a forgotten bookmark in a borrowed book did I discover a suitable candidate. On this bookmark was a photograph of the renowned philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche and one of his famous quotes: Il faut danser la vie (life should be danced).A simple accompaniment pattern created by the harp, piano, and marimba begins the piece. The first of two themes is a capricious melody introduced by a solo flute. The second theme, played by a solo horn, attempts to be amorous despite the cheeky accompaniments in the woodwinds and strings. An aggressive development of the two themes ensues with the amiable mood of the piece suddenly shattered by boisterous syncopated rhythms from the brass. The once amorous second theme transforms into a wild waltz. The brass section eventually dominates the texture with a macabre but quasi majestic variation on the waltz theme. After a quiet, introspective solo on the English horn, the accompaniment pattern heard at the very start attempts to capture the equanimity of the opening. Eventually the capricious first theme makes a resplendent return, this time played by the strings.Suite espaola (arr. Frhbeck de Burgos)isaac aLbniz(b. Camprodn, Catalonia, 1860 / d. Cambole-Bains, Pyrenes, 1909)Suite first published in a four-movement piano version: 1887Five movements of the Frhbeck de Burgos arrangement were performed February 2004. Two movements from the same suite were performed in September 2010.chiLd prodigy of thE first ordEr, it was isaac aLbniz good fortune to have a customs official a man required to travel internationally a great deal as a father. By the age of 15, young Isaac had toured the world as a precociously gifted pianist. The tours earned him money and reputation, enough to allow him to study in Leipzig and Brussels, with teachers such as Franz Liszt and Felipe Pedrell. The latter, a musicologist as well as teacher, encouraged Albniz to infuse his music with the rhythms, dances, and folk tunes of his homeland.Originally only four movements long, the Suite espaola was composed for piano in 1886, and was one of the first pieces Albniz composed after studies with Pedrell. Albniz publisher later added movements from other works into an eight-movement piano suite published as Op.47. Each movement of the suite bears the name, and influence, of the music from various places in Spain. Spanish conductor Rafael Frhbeck de Burgos arranged the suite for MP R O G R A M N O T E SPROGRAM NOTESALanDmark CLaSSIC maSterS Spanish Symphony" ! "!! !!!!"!#Community support builds great hospitals and the Royal Alexandra Hospital Foundation receives generous donations, including bequests, from across Alberta and beyond.Bequests and planned gifts are an inspired way to help ensure that the Royal Alexandra Hospital has the resources it needs to provide exceptional and compassionate patient care when it matters most, now and in the future.This ad was generously donated by The Robbins Foundation Canada."..4+&*"-1"/0/*!(**"!/: "6+4(("3*!.+/,&0(+1*!0&+*"(",%+*"6)&(00+&*.+4(("3+.$7%"*4+1/1,,+.0%"(0% ."4+1/1,,+.00%""*0&." +))1*&04*!%"(,)*4,"+,("/+&02/$++! %+& "#+.)"0+*)"0%"+4(("3*!.+/,&0(/0%""*" &.4&*)4&((895&)&".5/"4+5'+*+.222.+4(("3+.$SiGNATuRE www.Edmontonsymphony.com16Signature1_2013_p15-17.indd 16 9/6/13 12:10:50 PMSeries SponsorBill & Mary Jo RobbinsR2013/2014 SEASONRobbins LighteR CLassiCsOperetta MagicThursday, October 10 | 8 P MRobert bernhardt, conductoramy Wallis, sopranoJ. stRaUss iiDie Fledermaus: OverturegiLbeRt & sULLiVanPoor wandring one (from The Pirates of Penzance)The sun, whose rays are all ablaze (from The Mikado)o. stRaUsMy hero (from The Chocolate Soldier) (arr. Bernelle/Carstairs)RoMbeRgselections from The Student Prince (arr. Paul)LehRLove, lifes beginning and ending (from Paganini)heRbeRtArt is calling for me (from The Enchantress)INTERMISSION (20 minutes)oFFenbaChCan-Can (from Orpheus in the Underworld)heUbeRgeRMidnight Bells (from Der Opernball) (arr. Kreisler)KeRnMake believe (from Show Boat) (arr. Bennett)CaMPbeLLThe apology (from Anne of Green Gables) (arr. Pierce)RoDgeRs & haRtTo keep my love alive (from A Connecticut Yankee) (arr. Walker)LehRBallsirenen (from The Merry Widow)sonDheiMSend in the Clowns (from A Little Night Music) (arr. Sebesky)beRnsteinGlitter and be gay (from Candide)sChnbeRg/boUbLiLOn my own (from Les Misrables)LLoYD WebbeRThink of me (from The Phantom of the Opera)Program subject to changeBMr. Uchidas bio can be found on page 6.Ob bernhardT brings a unique perspective and ability each time he is on the podium, and in every genre. He is currently Principal Pops Conductor with the Chat-tanooga Symphony and Opera (where he was Music Director for 19 seasons) and is in his 17th season as Principal Pops Conductor of the Louisville Orchestra (and in his 32nd consecu-tive season there). Formerly, he was Principal Conductor of the Rochester Philhar-monic, Music Director and Conductor of the Tucson Symphony, Principal Guest Conductor of Kentucky Opera, Music Director and Conductor of the Amarillo Symphony and Artis-tic Director of the Lake Placid Sinfonietta.The 2012-13 season marked Mr. Bernhardts 20th anniversary with the Boston Pops, which he first conducted at John Williams invitation in 1992. Along with Boston, he has been a frequent guest conductor of the Baltimore Symphony, the Cincinnati Pops, the Pittsburgh Symphony, the Houston Symphony, the Dallas Symphony, the Seattle Symphony, the Tucson Sym-phony, the Santa Barbara Symphony and the Pacific Symphony. He has been a guest conductor with many others. A lover of opera, he conducted produc-tions with Kentucky Opera for 18 consecutive seasons, and for 19 seasons with his own company in Chattanooga, as well as many guest conducting engagements with the Nashville Opera. He received his masters degree with A R T I S T B I O SaRtist biosMedia Sponsor Media Sponsor Media Sponsorsignature www.EdmontonSymphony.com18Signature1_2013_p18-21.indd 18 2013-09-06 12:36 PMhonors from the University of Southern Californias School of Music, study-ing primarily with Daniel Lewis. He received his bachelors degree in fine arts from Union College in Schenectady, NY, where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa, Summa cum laude, and an Academic All-American Baseball Player. He lives with his wife, Nora, in Signal Mountain, Tennessee.Since making his ESO debut in May 2006, Bob Bernhardt has become a favourite with the orchestra and its audiences. 2013 marked his eighth consecutive appearance as conductor of Symphony Under the Sky, and he frequently conducts performances in ESO subscription series concerts and specials. His next ESO appearance will be at the Robbins Lighter Classics and Robbins Pops Christmas concerts in December.riginally from Vancouver, soprano Amy WAllis has estab-lished herself Canada-wide as an artist of the first rank with credits from Victoria to Prince Edward Island. As a leading lady at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival, she was hailed as Mabel in Gilbert & Sullivans The Pirates of Penzance as well as Sally in Youre a Good Man, Charlie Brown. For four seasons, she charmed the sellout crowds in PEI as Anne Shirley in the Charlottetown Festivals own production of Anne of Green Gables and subsequently appeared in the Sullivan Entertainment production of Anne of Avonlea. This coming season, she joins the Toronto Symphony for the first time as the headliner in Classic Broadway: Lerner & Loewe conducted by Steven Reineke. Further credits include Belle in Beauty and the Beast for the Arts Club Theatre Company of Vancouver, Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz for Drayton Entertainment, Peter in Peter Pan for the Royal City Musical Theatre of New Westminster, B.C., Hodel in Fiddler on the Roof for Stage West Mississauga, and Tina in the Canadian premiere of Kurt Weills Knicker-bocker Holiday for the Toronto Operetta Theatre. Twice nominated for a Jessie Richardson Award, she has been featured in The Crucible as Abigail Williams, Funny Girl as Maude, The Fantasticks as Luisa, Hello, Dolly! as Ermengarde and in Into the Woods as Red Riding Hood. Trained as a singer/actor/dancer, Ms. Wallis has been featured on CBC, for P&O Cruise Lines (registered in the United Kingdom), and with Marvin Hamlisch and the Seattle Symphony.This is Ms. Wallis debut with the ESO.perettA is defined (neW everymAn dictionAry of music) as a light opera or musical comedy, normally with spoken dialog. In this way, it can be seen as very similar to a book musical, such as those presented on Broadway (well hear excerpts from some of them tonight, too).Die Fledermaus (The Bat) is the most popular operetta composed by the Waltz King, Johann Strauss II (1825-1899). A lighthearted and clever story of pretense, disguise, and of course love, it contains several of Strauss great melodies most of which are presented in the delightful overture. The Edmonton Symphony unites with Edmonton Opera for Die Fledermaus this season (February 1, 4 & 6, 2014).The greatest English-language operettas were those composed by the British team of librettist William S. Gilbert (1836-1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900). Their works were often bitingly funny satires of the British class system, and we will hear arias from two of the best-known. The Pirates of Penzance actually premiered in New York City, not London, in 1879. The incredibly innocent Frederic sees women for the first time in his young life, and is besotted. One of them, Mabel, takes pity on him in the tender aria Poor wandring one, and the two fall madly in love.The Mikado had its first run beginning in 1885, going on for an unbeliev-able 672 performances, and its first revival in 1896 made it the first work to achieve 1,000 performances at Londons Savoy Theatre. Gilbert and Sullivan used the exotic setting of Japan for the operetta to poke fun at the absurdities of the abuses inherent in the British privileged set. The character of Nanki-Poo arrives in the town of Titipu with the hope of winning the hand of Yum-Yum. He does, after a fashion, gaining the right to marry her, on condition that he lose his head in a months time. Yum-Yum sings the song The sun, whose rays are all ablaze on the day of her wedding, an innocent and nave observation of her own beauty.Unrelated to the famous Strauss (with a double S at the end) family, composer Oscar Straus (1870-1954), wrote The Chocolate Soldier in 1908, based on George Bernard Shaws play Arms and the Man. It was a hit, and the song My hero is sung by Nadina, pining for the return of the man she thinks she loves, the soldier Alexius whom she soon learns is not nearly the hero she thought him to be.Sigmund Romberg (1887-1951) was born in Austria-Hungary, but moved to the United States in 1909. He is best known today for his many successful operettas, very much in the Viennese tradition of Strauss and Lehr (see below), though written for Broadway. The Student Prince opened in 1924 in Jolsons 59th Street Theater, with an original Broadway run of a very suc-cessful 608 performances. For the 1954 Hollywood film version, noted tenor Mario Lanza dubbed the singing voice of the character of Prince Karl. Walter Paul created the orchestra-only arrangement well hear tonight of some of the works popular themes.Paganini is an operetta that presents a fictional incident in the life of legendary violinist (and lover!) Nicol Paganini. It was written in 1924-25 by Hungarian-born Austrian composer Franz Lehr (1870-1948). The crux of the story concerns Paganinis love for Maria Anna Elisa, a love he must ultimately reject for the sake of his art. The aria sung in English to the words Love, lifes beginning and ending is from Act II, and in the actual stage work, is presented as a duet.OP R O G R A M N O T E SPROGRAM NOTESOSiGNATuRE 19SEPTEMbER/NOvEMbER 2013Signature1_2013_p18-21.indd 19 9/6/13 12:15:48 PMSeries SponsorBill & Mary Jo RobbinsR2013/2014 SEASONRobbins LighteR CLassiCsOperetta MagicThursday, October 10 | 8 P MRobert bernhardt, conductoramy Wallis, sopranoJ. stRaUss iiDie Fledermaus: OverturegiLbeRt & sULLiVanPoor wandring one (from The Pirates of Penzance)The sun, whose rays are all ablaze (from The Mikado)o. stRaUsMy hero (from The Chocolate Soldier) (arr. Bernelle/Carstairs)RoMbeRgselections from The Student Prince (arr. Paul)LehRLove, lifes beginning and ending (from Paganini)heRbeRtArt is calling for me (from The Enchantress)INTERMISSION (20 minutes)oFFenbaChCan-Can (from Orpheus in the Underworld)heUbeRgeRMidnight Bells (from Der Opernball) (arr. Kreisler)KeRnMake believe (from Show Boat) (arr. Bennett)CaMPbeLLThe apology (from Anne of Green Gables) (arr. Pierce)RoDgeRs & haRtTo keep my love alive (from A Connecticut Yankee) (arr. Walker)LehRBallsirenen (from The Merry Widow)sonDheiMSend in the Clowns (from A Little Night Music) (arr. Sebesky)beRnsteinGlitter and be gay (from Candide)sChnbeRg/boUbLiLOn my own (from Les Misrables)LLoYD WebbeRThink of me (from The Phantom of the Opera)Program subject to changeBMr. Uchidas bio can be found on page 6.Ob bernhardT brings a unique perspective and ability each time he is on the podium, and in every genre. He is currently Principal Pops Conductor with the Chat-tanooga Symphony and Opera (where he was Music Director for 19 seasons) and is in his 17th season as Principal Pops Conductor of the Louisville Orchestra (and in his 32nd consecu-tive season there). Formerly, he was Principal Conductor of the Rochester Philhar-monic, Music Director and Conductor of the Tucson Symphony, Principal Guest Conductor of Kentucky Opera, Music Director and Conductor of the Amarillo Symphony and Artis-tic Director of the Lake Placid Sinfonietta.The 2012-13 season marked Mr. Bernhardts 20th anniversary with the Boston Pops, which he first conducted at John Williams invitation in 1992. Along with Boston, he has been a frequent guest conductor of the Baltimore Symphony, the Cincinnati Pops, the Pittsburgh Symphony, the Houston Symphony, the Dallas Symphony, the Seattle Symphony, the Tucson Sym-phony, the Santa Barbara Symphony and the Pacific Symphony. He has been a guest conductor with many others. A lover of opera, he conducted produc-tions with Kentucky Opera for 18 consecutive seasons, and for 19 seasons with his own company in Chattanooga, as well as many guest conducting engagements with the Nashville Opera. He received his masters degree with A R T I S T B I O SaRtist biosMedia Sponsor Media Sponsor Media Sponsorsignature www.EdmontonSymphony.com18Signature1_2013_p18-21.indd 18 2013-09-06 12:36 PMLike Sigmund Romberg (above), Victor Herbert (1859-1924) came from Europe to seek success writing for the American stage. The Irish-born musician was an outstanding cellist, and left his position with an orchestra in Stuttgart to settle in New York. Best known today for his operetta Babes in Toyland, Herbert composed The Enchantress in 1911, the tale of a woman hired to seduce a young heir in order to trick him into abdicating. Of course, she ends up falling for the object of her subterfuge. Art is calling for me is sung by the title character Vivien, who is determined to leave her mark as a great opera diva.One of the great operettas is Orpheus in the Underworld, by the ribald French composer Jacques Offenbach (1819-1880). It savagely lampoons the hypocrisy and mores of Paris at the end of the 19th century, using the classic Greek myth of Orpheus pursuing his dead wife to the underworld as its basis. Its merry overture is most famous for the concluding section the rousing, high-kicking Can-Can.Der Opernball (The Opera Ball) is an 1898 operetta, and virtually the only work by which we now know the name of Richard Heuberger (1850-1914). The son of a bandage maker, Heuberger became a respected, if not stellar, figure among all the great musicians in Vienna in that tumultuous period before World War One. Der Opernball has a familiar story of wives testing their husbands fidelity with disguises and masks with a central plot point built around the tolling of bells at a ball. It is still in the repertory of a number of German-language opera houses. It was popular enough in the early 20th century to attract the attention of violin virtuoso Fritz Kreisler, who fashioned a work for violin and orchestra based on music from the operetta, which Kreisler called Midnight Bells.The American book musical came of age when Jerome Kern (1885-1945) first read Edna Ferbers book about life along the Mississippi River. With Oscar Hammerstein II (1895-1960) supplying the book and lyrics, Show Boat became a landmark of American theatre, and the greatest triumph of producer Florenz Ziegfelds career. A multi-generational tale of the family that ran the boat itself, as well as the poor African-American families that lived along the rivers shore, some great Broadway songs came from the production. Make believe is a poignant song, first sung as a duet between the compul-sive gambler Gaylord and the young Magnolia, then later by Gaylord to his daughter (by Magnolia), as he is about to desert them.There is a movement afoot to determine if Canadas Anne of Green Gables qualifies as the longest-running musical in history. What began as a made-for-TV musical production in 1956 has become an annual tradition, headlining the Charlottetown Festival every year since 1965. The music is by Norman Campbell (1924-2004), with a book by Don Harron (b. 1924), and lyrics by Harron, Campbell, Mavor Moore, and Elaine Campbell. The apology (aka Oh Mrs. Lynde) is from Act I.Before teaming up with Oscar Hammerstein II (see above), composer Richard Rodgers (1902-1979) enjoyed a long string of Broadway successes with another lyricist, Lorenz Hart (1895-1943). A Connecticut Yankee, based on Mark Twains book, opened the same year as Show Boat (1927), and ran for a respectable 421 performances. To keep my love alive actually originated in the 1943 revival production, written especially for the comedic talents of singer Vivienne Segal, who played the villainess Morgan le Fay. It describes the many ways she has got rid of her previous husbands, so as to never have been unfaithful to any of them. It was the last song Hart wrote before contracting the pneumonia from which he died.The most famous and enduring operetta of all is The Merry Widow by Franz Lehr (see above). First performed in 1905, it has never left the stage, and continues to delight audiences with its perfect mix of romance, intrigue, and gentle satire. Ballsirenen (Sirens of the Ball) is actually a waltz based on themes from The Merry Widow. Those familiar with the operetta will hear, after an introductory section, a bit of Danilos song about his favourite place the caf Maxims before the lush waltz music so loved from the work takes over the rest of the charming suite.Stephen Sondheims (b. 1930) musical A Little Night Music (1973) gets its name from the famous serenade by Mozart, but its story was based on a film by Ingmar Bergman. It won Tonys for Best Musical, Best Book of a Musical (Hugh Wheeler), and Best Original Score (Sondheim). Send in the Clowns, perhaps Sondheims most famous song, is sung in the show by the character of Desire, a small-time actress who wonders at the lot she finds herself in, sleeping with a married man in a vain attempt to stave off her ennui. In the instrumental arrangement to be heard tonight by Don Sebesky, our new Concertmaster Robert Uchida and Principal Cello Colin Ryan have featured parts.Depending on how you look at it, Leonard Bernsteins (1918-1990) musical version of Voltaires Candide was either a Broadway musical flop or an operatic triumph. The original production opened on Broadway and ran for three months and a day beginning in late 1956. Not much for a musical but as an opera (and this show definitely straddles the two genres), its pretty incredible. A highlight of the work is Glitter and be gay, an effervescent aria for coloratura soprano. Coloratura refers to a vocal technique that is deliberately virtuosic, featuring leaps and wide runs, and demanding extraordinary vocal agility.The 1980s saw the birth of the mega-musical; sprawling, spectacular productions in which staging, special effects, and showmanship were as important to the experience as plot, music, and singing. Excerpts from two of them conclude tonights performance. Les Misrables, based on Victor Hugos seminal novel of the poor in post-Napoleonic France , was first staged 2013/2014 SEASONROBBINS LIGHTER CLASSICS Operetta Magicwww.EdmontonSymphony.comSignature1_2013_p18-21.indd 20 9/6/13 12:56:22 PMin a French sports complex in 1980, with music by Claude-Michel Schnberg (b. 1944) and lyrics by Alain Boublil (b. 1941) and Jean-Marc Natel (b. 1942). The original Broadway production (with English lyrics adapted by Herbert Kretzmer b. 1925), opened on Broadway in 1987, and did not close until 2003 a stunning 6,680 performances. On my own is sung at the beginning of Act II by ponine, a daughter of privilege who winds up among the poor.If the original Broadway run of Les Miz sounds impressive, nothing holds a candle (or a spectacular chandelier of candles!) to the success of Andrew Lloyd Webbers (b. 1948) The Phantom of the Opera. At the time of this writing, Phantoms Broadway run was closing in on an unbelievable 11,000 performances, having opened in 1988 and continuing to this day. Based on the potboiler novel by Gaston Leroux, with lyrics by Charles Hart (b. 1961) and Richard Stilgoe (b. 1943), Phantom has proved the ultimate combination of music, romance, and spectacle. Think of me is the introductory number for the shows heroine, Charlotte, who sings the song to demonstrate that she is ready to move from the chorus of the Paris Opera to centre stage. One more number to throw at you concerns the worldwide success of Phantom. When you combine ticket sales, merchandising, licensing and everything else, it is estimated that its total gross is about $5.6 billion, making the show the most financially successful entertainment event ever. Program notes 2013 by D.T. Baker2013 - 2014 seasonLondon HandeL PLayersFriday, october 4, 8 pmconvocation HallIsabeL bayrakdarIan, soPranoFriday, october 25, 8 pmmcdougall united cHurcHanonymous 4saturday, november 9, 7:30 pmWest end cHristian reFormed cHurcHTrIo Jean PauLFriday, January 31, 8 pmconvocation HallJos mIgueL moreno, baroque guITarsaturday, marcH 22, 8 pmconvocation HallJames eHnes, vIoLInWednesday, april 2, 8 pmmcdougall united cHurcHTIckeTs from TIX on THe square,THe gramoPHone and aT THe doorFor details, visit www.edmonToncHambermusIc.orgEdmonton Recital Society8SeaSon2013-2014Tickets available at Tix on the Square or at the door.www.EdmontonRecital.com or contact us at 780.264.2844www.edmontonrecital.comSpecial Thanksoctober 8, 2013 (tueSday) New Orford String QuartetJonathan Crow, violinAndrew Wan, violinEric Nowlin, violaBrian Manker, cello7:30 pmMuttart Hall, Alberta College Conservatory of Music10050 MacDonald Drive, Edmonton, AB$35 (adult) / $25 (senior) / $10 (student)october 16, 2013 (WedneSday)Sonic EscapeShawn Wyckoff, fluteNan-Cheng Chen, cello7:30 pmYellowhead Brewery10229 105 Street, Edmonton, AB$45 (adult & senior) / $20 (student)They are a force of epic proportion...in the process of becoming an American Treasure. Touhill Performing Arts Center (St. Louis, Missouri)...Canadas top string quartet...theyve taken our chamber music scene by storm.... CBC 2013Leonard Bernsteinseptember/November 2013Signature1_2013_p18-21.indd 21 9/6/13 12:17:35 PMRSignature1_2013_p22-25.indd 22 9/6/13 12:19:10 PMRSunday Prelude, 1:15 pm Upper Circle (Third Level) Lobby with D.T. Baker & John EstacioSunday Encore, post-performance Main Lobby with James Feddeck, Adam Zukiewicz, Robert Uchida & John EstacioROSSINIIl barbiere di Siviglia: Overture (8)*MENDELSSOHNViolin Concerto in E minor, Op.64 (31)* Allegro molto appassionato Andante Allegro non troppo Allegro molto vivaceINTERMISSION (20 minutes)ESTACIOFrenergy (1998 ESO commission) (5)*RACHMANINOFFPiano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op.18 (32)* Moderato Adagio sostenuto Allegro scherzandoProgram subject to change*indicates approximate performance durationurrently in his fourth season as Assistant Conductor of The Cleveland Orchestra, James Feddeck made his debut with the orchestra in August 2009. In March 2011, he replaced Franz Welser-Mst at the last minute to conduct the Zrich Operas staged production of Mozarts Don Giovanni at Severance Hall. He has also directed a number of new commu-nity initiatives including Cleveland Orchestra collaborative performances with the Cleveland Museum of Art and Cleveland Play House. In addition to his duties as Assistant Conductor, Mr. Feddeck serves as Music Director of the Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra. In the United States, he has conducted the orchestras of Atlanta, Charleston, Charlotte, Grand Rapids, Indianapolis, Memphis, Omaha, St. Louis, San Diego, and Toledo and ap-peared several times at the Aspen Music Festival.CJames Feddeck, conductorAdam Zukiewicz, piano (2012 Shean Competition winner)Robert Uchida, violinA R T I S T B I O SARTIST BIOSRobert Uchidas bio can be found on page 6.Guest artist bios and program notes continue next page.SIgNATURE 23SEpTEMBER/NOvEMBER 20132013/2014 SEASONRBC SUNDAy SHOwCASEMendelssohn & Rachmaninoffsunday, October 20 | 2 P MSignature1_2013_p22-25.indd 23 9/10/13 1:51:50 PMRSignature1_2013_p22-25.indd 22 9/6/13 12:19:10 PMJames Feddeck was Assistant Conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra for two seasons. He was a conducting fellow for three summers at the American Academy of Conducting at the Aspen Music Festival and School, received the Robert J. Harth Conductor Prize in 2007 and the Aspen Conducting Prize in 2008. He was also the unanimous winner of the Sixth Vakhtang Jordania International Conducting Competition and, at 22, its youngest participant. Mr. Feddeck is also the recipient of a Career Assistance Award from the Solti Foundation U.S. Mr. Feddecks musical training and background is unusually diverse and multifaceted. He was admitted to the Oberlin Conservatory of Music in four areas piano, oboe, organ, and conducting a rare distinction. After receiving undergraduate and graduate degrees from Oberlin, he continued his conducting studies at the University of Michigan and at Aspen, where he was a protg of David Zinman. In 2010 he was recognized by Oberlin as the first recipient of the Outstanding Young Alumni Award for professional achievement and contri-butions to society.This is Mr. Feddecks debut with the ESO.dam ZukiewicZ is a pianist of great integrity. He has performed across Europe, United States, Canada, Japan, and Brazil. His performance during the 2007 Millennium Stage Con-servatory Project at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. was broadcast online. He has also appeared many times on TV in Poland. In the summer of 2010 he participated with the Max Joseph Trio in the Peace Concerts Series organized by the Museum of the city of Jawor. In Canada, Mr. ukiewicz won Edmontons 2012 Shean Piano Competition. He was also a winner of the 2011 TD Canada Trust Music Competition and was awarded 2nd prize at the 13th Pacific Piano Competition in Richmond, B.C. Maintaining an active international career, Adam ukiewicz will be per-forming a chamber music concert with his recently founded Max Joseph Trio at the Munich Opera Festival 2013. In Canada, Mr. ukiewicz will be participating in the 2013 Elora Festival in Elora, Ontario, and present a lec-ture recital at the Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Music in Waterloo. Further musical projects include solo recitals in the Greater Toronto Area, chamber music concerts with Max Joseph Trio in Poland and Germany, and appearances at international piano competitions throughout North America and Europe. Mr. ukiewicz holds a Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of Toronto, where he studied with Professsors Marietta Orlov and James Parker; and a Master of Music degree from Indiana University, where he worked with Arnaldo Cohen. He is currently an Instructor of Piano at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music.This is Mr. Zukiewiczs debut with the ESO.Il barbiere di Siviglia: Overture (The Barber of Seville)Gioacchino Rossini(b. Pesaro, 1792 / d. Passy, near Paris, 1868)First performance of the opera: February 20, 1816 in RomeLast ESO performance of the overture: Symphony Under the Sky presented by ATB Financial 2012he oveRtuRe with which we have come to indelibly associate Rossinis comic masterpiece The Barber of Seville (or its associations with Bugs Bunny massaging hair tonic on the bald pate of Elmer Fudd!) has, musically, nothing to do with the actual opera. For good reason, too. Gioacchino Rossini (1792-1868) wrote the overture for another opera a drama, in fact that flopped. Completely unapolo-getically, and quite typically for him, Rossini merely appropriated what was a fine curtain-raiser, and added it to his comic opera of the merry comings, goings, and machinations of Figaro and his fellows.Violin Concerto in E minor, Op.64Felix mendelssohn(b. Hamburg, 1809 / d. Leipzig, 1847)First performed: March 13, 1845 in LeipzigLast ESO performance: November 2010elix mendelssohn aRRived in the woRld at a house in Hamburg where, only a year later, in that very same house, a boy named Ferdinand David was born. Mendelssohn became one of the greatest composers and conductors of his day, while David became one of its most gifted violinists. The two also developed a close friendship although they did not meet until Mendelssohn was 16 and David, 15.In 1835, the 26-year-old Mendelssohn, as the new conductor of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, appointed David to the position of concertmaster. In 1838, Mendelssohn wrote to his friend, I should like to write a violin concerto for you next winter. Work on the concerto was slow, however, and it was not completed until 1844. David, naturally enough, assisted greatly with the violin passages, and in all likelihood shaped the lions share of the cadenzas. The work finally premiered on March 13, 1845, but while David was indeed the soloist, illness kept Mendelssohn from conducting.All three movements are played without a pause. After only a single bar from the orchestra, the violin makes its entrance, stating the elegant and passionate first subject. Violin and orchestra develop this, as well as a coun-tersubject. The second principal theme of the movement is first presented on flutes and clarinets, over the violins sustained low G. The development of this material is lavish, including some transcendent passages for the soloist.The second movement also begins with only the briefest of orchestral introductions, ushering in a solo violin passage that ranks as one of Mendelssohns most poignant melodies. The second subject contrasts with an agitated feel, but the violin restores the serenity of the movement by the end. A brief Allegretto non troppo leads to the vivacious and spirited Rondo finale, with a principal theme that is quintessential Mendelssohn: sprightly and effervescent, a vibrant conclusion to a work that stands as a cornerstone of the violin repertoire.FP R O G R A M N O T E SPROGRAM NOTESTARBC Sunday ShOwCaSE Mendelssohn & Rachmaninoff2013/2014 SEASONSiGNATuRE www.edmontonsymphony.com24Signature1_2013_p22-25.indd 24 9/6/13 12:20:28 PMFrenergy (1998 ESO commission)John Estacio(b. Newmarket, Ontario, 1966)First performed: March 20, 1998 in the Winspear Centre, EdmontonLast ESO performance: Symphony Under the Sky 2005Program note by the composer:hE bulk of thE musical matErial found in this piEcE comes from sketches for my Triple Concerto. These sketches were to be part of the proposed final movement for the concerto, a fast-paced scherzo to bring the piece to a wild close. However, for various reasons, this ending did not make it to the final draft. Not one to waste, I decided to mount this music on its own for orchestra.The title comes from an amalgamation of the words frenetic and energy that were the two qualities I desired for the ending of the concerto. The tempo for this short concert opener is brisk and the pacing of melodic ideas is often a bit frantic as befitting the title.It begins with a thunderous introduction by the percussion who establish the infectious 6/8 pulse. After an orchestral tutti, the winds introduce a chromatic melody that is quickly tossed back and forth from pairings of instruments. This quirky little melody often complements an ostentatious tune frequently performed by the brass. The third melody, introduced by a solo flute, is perhaps the most substantial tune of the piece and is strongly characterized by the 6/8 lilt of the piece. A harmonically restless string pas-sage leads into a return of the opening material and the piece concludes with a full force orchestral tutti along with the pounding drums of the opening.Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op.18sErgEi rachmaninoff(b. Oneg, Novgorod, 1873 / d. Beverly Hills, 1943)First performed: October 27, 1901 in MoscowLast ESO performance: April 2011ErgEi rachmaninoff could Easily havE madE a finE living as a concert pianist. Considered one of the most virtuosic who ever lived, precious few recordings of his mastery were made. It was said that his hands could span an eleventh on the keyboard (an octave, plus three semi-tones more), while his fluid playing was the stuff of legend. Yet while his greatest source of fulfillment was as a composer, his delicate nature and early struggles made that career path a precarious one at the beginning.Following the spectacular failures of both his First Piano Concerto (1892) and his First Symphony (1897), the already highly-sensitive Sergei Rachmaninoff was a wreck. He was devastated, and while he continued to perform, he did not even attempt to compose. Friends and family, equally at their wits end, took the drastic step, in 1900, of taking him to Dr. Nicolai Dahl, who specialized in motivation through a sort of hypnotic suggestion. Over and over, Dr. Dahl told Rachmaninoff, You will begin to write your concerto, You will write with ease, and Your concerto will be a fine work.Bizarre though the treatment may seem to be, it worked. In Moscow on October 14, 1901, Rachmaninoff premiered his Second Piano Concerto and it became the most popular piano concerto of the 20th century, and its popularity has not diminished into this century either. It was dedicated, appropriately enough, to Dr. Dahl. Awash with strong melodies, several pop songs have been drawn from its rich soil.Piano chords, from soft to loud, begin the work, ushering the first sweeping melody on the strings. The entire movement is Moderato, never rushed, its piano pas-sages running a gamut from brilliant to introspective. The cadenza is not a typical soloists flourish that one might have expected from so sensational a pianist. While it is supremely difficult, it does not sound that way.The beautiful second movement is a serene nocturne. The finale is one of the most recognizable in music. It consists of two dominant, contrasting themes. One is sweepingly romantic, while the other is a lively, thoroughly Russian Allegro, rhythmic and dashing. Program notes 2013 by D.T. Baker, except as notedTSseptember/November 2013Signature1_2013_p22-25.indd 25 9/10/13 1:52:37 PMJames Feddeck was Assistant Conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra for two seasons. He was a conducting fellow for three summers at the American Academy of Conducting at the Aspen Music Festival and School, received the Robert J. Harth Conductor Prize in 2007 and the Aspen Conducting Prize in 2008. He was also the unanimous winner of the Sixth Vakhtang Jordania International Conducting Competition and, at 22, its youngest participant. Mr. Feddeck is also the recipient of a Career Assistance Award from the Solti Foundation U.S. Mr. Feddecks musical training and background is unusually diverse and multifaceted. He was admitted to the Oberlin Conservatory of Music in four areas piano, oboe, organ, and conducting a rare distinction. After receiving undergraduate and graduate degrees from Oberlin, he continued his conducting studies at the University of Michigan and at Aspen, where he was a protg of David Zinman. In 2010 he was recognized by Oberlin as the first recipient of the Outstanding Young Alumni Award for professional achievement and contri-butions to society.This is Mr. Feddecks debut with the ESO.dam ZukiewicZ is a pianist of great integrity. He has performed across Europe, United States, Canada, Japan, and Brazil. His performance during the 2007 Millennium Stage Con-servatory Project at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. was broadcast online. He has also appeared many times on TV in Poland. In the summer of 2010 he participated with the Max Joseph Trio in the Peace Concerts Series organized by the Museum of the city of Jawor. In Canada, Mr. ukiewicz won Edmontons 2012 Shean Piano Competition. He was also a winner of the 2011 TD Canada Trust Music Competition and was awarded 2nd prize at the 13th Pacific Piano Competition in Richmond, B.C. Maintaining an active international career, Adam ukiewicz will be per-forming a chamber music concert with his recently founded Max Joseph Trio at the Munich Opera Festival 2013. In Canada, Mr. ukiewicz will be participating in the 2013 Elora Festival in Elora, Ontario, and present a lec-ture recital at the Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Music in Waterloo. Further musical projects include solo recitals in the Greater Toronto Area, chamber music concerts with Max Joseph Trio in Poland and Germany, and appearances at international piano competitions throughout North America and Europe. Mr. ukiewicz holds a Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of Toronto, where he studied with Professsors Marietta Orlov and James Parker; and a Master of Music degree from Indiana University, where he worked with Arnaldo Cohen. He is currently an Instructor of Piano at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music.This is Mr. Zukiewiczs debut with the ESO.Il barbiere di Siviglia: Overture (The Barber of Seville)Gioacchino Rossini(b. Pesaro, 1792 / d. Passy, near Paris, 1868)First performance of the opera: February 20, 1816 in RomeLast ESO performance of the overture: Symphony Under the Sky presented by ATB Financial 2012he oveRtuRe with which we have come to indelibly associate Rossinis comic masterpiece The Barber of Seville (or its associations with Bugs Bunny massaging hair tonic on the bald pate of Elmer Fudd!) has, musically, nothing to do with the actual opera. For good reason, too. Gioacchino Rossini (1792-1868) wrote the overture for another opera a drama, in fact that flopped. Completely unapolo-getically, and quite typically for him, Rossini merely appropriated what was a fine curtain-raiser, and added it to his comic opera of the merry comings, goings, and machinations of Figaro and his fellows.Violin Concerto in E minor, Op.64Felix mendelssohn(b. Hamburg, 1809 / d. Leipzig, 1847)First performed: March 13, 1845 in LeipzigLast ESO performance: November 2010elix mendelssohn aRRived in the woRld at a house in Hamburg where, only a year later, in that very same house, a boy named Ferdinand David was born. Mendelssohn became one of the greatest composers and conductors of his day, while David became one of its most gifted violinists. The two also developed a close friendship although they did not meet until Mendelssohn was 16 and David, 15.In 1835, the 26-year-old Mendelssohn, as the new conductor of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, appointed David to the position of concertmaster. In 1838, Mendelssohn wrote to his friend, I should like to write a violin concerto for you next winter. Work on the concerto was slow, however, and it was not completed until 1844. David, naturally enough, assisted greatly with the violin passages, and in all likelihood shaped the lions share of the cadenzas. The work finally premiered on March 13, 1845, but while David was indeed the soloist, illness kept Mendelssohn from conducting.All three movements are played without a pause. After only a single bar from the orchestra, the violin makes its entrance, stating the elegant and passionate first subject. Violin and orchestra develop this, as well as a coun-tersubject. The second principal theme of the movement is first presented on flutes and clarinets, over the violins sustained low G. The development of this material is lavish, including some transcendent passages for the soloist.The second movement also begins with only the briefest of orchestral introductions, ushering in a solo violin passage that ranks as one of Mendelssohns most poignant melodies. The second subject contrasts with an agitated feel, but the violin restores the serenity of the movement by the end. A brief Allegretto non troppo leads to the vivacious and spirited Rondo finale, with a principal theme that is quintessential Mendelssohn: sprightly and effervescent, a vibrant conclusion to a work that stands as a cornerstone of the violin repertoire.FP R O G R A M N O T E SPROGRAM NOTESTARBC Sunday ShOwCaSE Mendelssohn & Rachmaninoff2013/2014 SEASONSiGNATuRE www.edmontonsymphony.com24Signature1_2013_p22-25.indd 24 9/6/13 12:20:28 PMFLike any Symphony,every Landmark home iS a maSterpiece.We are proud to sponsor the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra. Please enjoy the show.LandmarkGroup.ca000Sig-LandmarkGroup-FP.indd 1 8/30/13 8:34:13 AMSignature1_2013_p26-29.indd 26 9/6/13 12:21:55 PMF2013/2014 SEASONFriday Masters Sponsor Landmark Classic Masters SponsorMasterful MozartAfterthoughts, Friday post-performance, Main Lobby with William Eddins and Sara Davis BuechnerSymphony Prelude, 7:15 pm Saturday, Upper Circle (Third Level) Lobby with D.T. BakerAll music by Wolfgang Amad MOZARTBassoon Concerto in B-flat Major, K.191/186e (20)* Allegro Andanta ma adagio Rondo: tempo di menuettoConcerto for Flute and Harp in C Major, K.299 (27)* Allegro Andantino Rondeau: AllegroINTERMISSION (20 minutes)Concert Rondo for Piano in A Major, K.386 (ed. Badura-Skoda/Mackerras)(cadenza by Sara Davis Buechner) (8)*Concerto No. 10 for Two Pianos in E-flat Major, K.365/316a (24)* Allegro Andante Rondo: AllegroProgram subject to change*indicates approximate performance durationara Davis Buechner enjoys a vibrant international performance and recording career as a musician of intelligence, integrity and all- encompassing technical prowess (New York Times), fascinating and astound-ing virtuosity (Philippine Star), and thoughtful artistry in the full service of music(Washington Post). She established her early career as winner of a bouquet of prizes at the worlds great piano competitions, including the Gold Medal of the 1984 Gina Bachauer International Piano Competition, and a Bronze Medal in the 1986 Tchaikovsky International Piano Competition in Moscow. With an active repertoire of over 100 piano concertos ranging from Bach to Wuorinen, Ms. Buechner has appeared as soloist with many of the worlds prominent orchestras: New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland, San Francisco, Vancouver, the CBC Radio Orchestra, Japan Philharmonic, Birmingham (U.K.), BBC Philharmonic, Kuopio (Finland), Slovak Philharmonic, and the Orquesta Sinfnica de Castilla y Len (Spain). The New York Times greeted her CD of piano music by Rudolf Friml as a revelation, and devoted the front page of its Sunday Arts & Leisure section to her 1997 world premiere recording of the Bach-Busoni Goldberg Variations. Ms. Buechners versatility extends to many premieres of new music, and collaborations with film and dance projects. A former faculty member of New York University, she has presented lectures and masterclasses worldwide. Now a Canadian resident, Sara Davis Buechner is Associate Professor of Music at the University of British Columbia School in Vancouver. She is a principal classical music consultant to Dover Publications, and plays the Yamaha Piano exclusively.Ms. Buechner last appeared with the ESO at Symphony Under the Sky presented by ATB Financial 2012.William Eddins, conductor & pianoSara Davis Buechner, pianoNora Bumanis, harpElizabeth Faulkner, fluteSarah Tako, bassoonFriday, november 1 | 7 : 3 0 p M & saturday, november 2 | 8 p MSA R T I S T B I O SARTIST BIOSFRIDAy MASTERS & LANDMARk CLASSIC MASTERSLike any Symphony,every Landmark home iS a maSterpiece.We are proud to sponsor the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra. Please enjoy the show.LandmarkGroup.ca000Sig-LandmarkGroup-FP.indd 1 8/30/13 8:34:13 AMMr. Eddinss bio can be found on page 6.Guest artist bios and program notes continue next page.SIgNATuRE 27SEpTEMBER/NOvEMBER 2013Signature1_2013_p26-29.indd 27 9/6/13 12:22:22 PMFLike any Symphony,every Landmark home iS a maSterpiece.We are proud to sponsor the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra. Please enjoy the show.LandmarkGroup.ca000Sig-LandmarkGroup-FP.indd 1 8/30/13 8:34:13 AMSignature1_2013_p26-29.indd 26 9/6/13 12:21:55 PMora Bumanis has been Principal Harp of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra since 1980. She is a graduate of the University of Toronto, where she studied with Judy Loman. In addition to her busy orchestral sched-ule, Ms. Bumanis is much in demand as a soloist, recitalist, and teacher. She has performed with most of the leading Canadian symphony orchestras, as well as the National Ballet and Canadian Opera Orchestras. Nora Bumanis has given many recitals throughout North America and Europe. She is also in great demand as a chamber musician and has frequently been broadcast on CBC radio and TV.Ms. Bumanis teaches at the University of Alberta and Alberta College Conservatory. She was on the faculty of the International Youth Orches-tra Festival in Banff. She was Managing Director of the Jasper Festival of Music and Wine from 2000 - 2003, and has been a frequent performer at the Festival of the Sound in Parry Sound, Ontario. Nora Bumanis and Julia Shaw began their collaboration as Canadas first professional harp duo in 1988. They have recorded five CDs and performed extensively throughout Canada. She was Global TVs Woman of Vision in February 2009 and is an active member of the Edmonton Glenora Rotary Club.Ms. Bumanis last appeared as a soloist with the ESO in September 2012.true Alberta girl, ElizaBEth FaulknEr has grown into an accomplished flute dignitary for the Wild Rose Province. She acquired a music degree with distinction from the University of Alberta, and after playing as the Principal Flute for the Edmonton Youth Orchestra, she has progressed to play as Acting Principal Flute for the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra and the Principal Flute for the Red Deer Symphony Orchestra. Playing for the National Ceremonial Guard, Ms. Faulkner has helped represent Canada to royalty, foreign emissaries, national, and international leaders. Locally, she has performed numerous solos with various ensembles (Alberta Baroque Ensemble, Pro Coro Canada, and more), and works for Music Services International Ltd. as their first flute for Citadel Theatre productions.Elizabeth Faulkner is also an accomplished flute teacher, with an education degree in music. She has taught flute at the Kings University College, North American Baptist College (now Taylor Seminary), and Northwest Bible College. Furthermore, she was employed by the Alberta Distance Learning Centre as the principal editor for the develop-ment of their music program. Her other loves include her husband and two children.Ms. Faulkner last appeared with the ESO as a soloist in Symphony Under the Sky 2011.ike many musicians, sarah tako began her musical studies at the piano, studying with Inese Krievans from the age of four. She also studied oboe for nearly five years with Stacy Kern, a wood-wind specialist. After hearing her teacher play, she fell in love with the rich, lyrical, and sometimes humorous sound of the bassoon, which became her primary instru-ment. Ms. Tako recently graduated from Mahtomedi High School in Mahtomedi, Minnesota, having taken many of her classes at the University of Minnesota. She studied bassoon and participated in mas-terclasses and reed-making classes with John Miller, and Norbert Nielubowski, Principal and second bassoonists of the Minnesota Orchestra, respectively. She also participated in masterclasses with bassoonist Frank Morelli of the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra and Per Hannevold, of the Bergen Philharmonic. Sarah Tako was a member of the Minnesota Youth Symphonies for seven seasons and recently performed the first movement of Mozarts Bassoon Concerto with the MYS Symphony Orchestra. She also performed the con-certo with the Minneapolis Pops Orchestra in July 2013. She was awarded Outstanding Woodwind student and performed the Weber Bassoon Con-certo at the Birch Creek Performance Center in Door County, Wisconsin, in 2011. She has been a featured artist on Minnesota Public Radio program Minnesota Varsity, where she recorded Gabriel Piernes Solo de Concert. She also performed this piece on air at the Fitzgerald Theater in downtown Saint Paul. In addition to bassoon, Ms. Tako enjoys playing the piano, studying music theory, and teaching children both bassoon and piano. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her family, friends, and dogs, swing dancing, swimming, and listening to an eclectic variety of music. She is currently studying bassoon performance as a freshman at the Curtis Insti-tute of Music in Philadelphia with Daniel Matsukawa, principal bassoonist of the Philadelphia Orchestra.This is Ms. Takos debut with the ESO.music oF WolFgang amad mozart(b. Salzburg, 1756 / d. Vienna, 1791)Bassoon Concerto in B-flat Major, K.191/186eManuscript dated June 4, 1774 in SalzburgLast ESO performance: May 1994ozarts lonE Bassoon concErto is not only thE first non-piano concerto he composed, but also one of the earliest concertos he wrote at all. He was eighteen years old when he put the date of June 4, 1774, on the manuscript, but by then, he was already a veteran musician, and a well-travelled one at that. Its likely that he had a particular musician in mind for this unique concerto; who exactly that was remains a mystery.While adhering to a familiar format in design, the Bassoon Concerto still brims with Mozartean grace, and absolutely mastery of that design. P R O G R A M N O T E SPROGRAM NOTESMNAL2013/2014 SEA-Friday Masters & LandMarK CLassiC Masters Masterful MozartSiGNATuRE www.Edmontonsymphony.com28Signature1_2013_p26-29.indd 28 9/6/13 12:22:56 PMThe orchestra presents the main material of the opening movement, while the soloists entrance takes that material, and begins to build upon it, demonstrat-ing the surprisingly lyrical and technical capacities of the instrument.Listen closely to the main melody of the second movement. It first appeared in sketchbooks dating back to Mozarts childhood, but opera lovers may recognize it as the opening of his famous aria Porgi amor, from Le nozze di Figaro. It was obviously a melody dear to the composers heart, so to assign such a lovely song to the bassoon shows that Mozart saw melodic aspects in the instrument that many overlook. The finale is in a rondo-variation form, set to a minuet rhythm. The bassoon is given ample opportunities for flashy display, including leaps of surprising expanse, and nimble work for the fingers.Concerto for Flute and Harp in C Major, K.299Composed April 1778Last ESO performance: Symphony Under the Sky 2011hat Mozart sought his whole, brief life, was a court appointment a steady and prestigious job that would set him up for life. I will no longer be a fiddler, he once wrote to his father. I want to conduct at the clavier and accompany arias. It was not to be, however, and he was dependent upon commissions his entire career. So it was on a trip to Paris in 1777-78 that the Count de Guines commissioned the 21-year-old Mozart for a concerto for the Count and his daughter. Mozarts father encouraged his son to take the commission, as the Count, he had been told, was well connected to Marie Antoinette herself. The Count played the flute and his daughter the harp both instruments for which Mozart had expressed, to be kind, antipathy.Nevertheless, he admired the talents of these serious amateurs, and wrote a charming concerto very much in the French court style, full of delightful melodies in all three movements, with plenty of challenges for both soloists. The harp of Mozarts day, it must be remembered, was a single-action instrument with limited ability to modulate. The final movement is a particularly clever one, with Mozart setting the rondo to the French court dance the gavotte. It is worth noting that not only did the commission not lead to any appointment to French nobility, but the Count never even get around to paying Mozart for his work. There is also no evidence that the Count and his daughter ever actually played the concerto.Concert Rondo for Piano in A Major, K.386 (ed. Badura-Skoda/Mackerras)(cadenza by Sara Davis Buechner)Composed in 1782This is the ESO premiere of the workhere are a nuMber of single-MoveMent works like this among Mozarts output that we know of. Most of them, un-derstandably, are thought to be discarded or replacement movements for various concertos. The case of the Concert Rondo, K.386, however, is differ-ent. Long thought to be a discarded finale to his Concerto in A, K.414, there is now considerable weight given to the idea that this unique movement is exactly that a one-off, stand-alone work a singular case in Mozarts catalog. As Sara Davis Buechner writes, Constanze Mozart (Wolfgangs widow) apparently sold separate pages of the manuscript off, piece by piece. So it was in a piecemeal state in the 1930s when Alfred Einstein made his reconstruction. In the 1980s, the remaining parts of the manuscript were discovered, and the piece was properly re-reconstructed. Ms. Buechner wrote the cadenza we will hear this evening.Concerto No. 10 for Two Pianos in E-flat Major, K.365/316aFirst performed: November 23, 1781 in ViennaLast ESO performance: September 2000n Mozarts day, perforMances on Multiple keyboards were not uncommon, but works written for such forces were. Mozarts father Leopold said of his son that he had written the first sonata for piano four-hands ever. Wolfgang, of course, had the ideal keyboard partner in his beloved sister, Maria Anna or Nannerl as she was affectionately known. Five years his senior and nearly as talented as Wolfgang, Nannerl had been part of the early tours that made the young Mozart famous, performing duets of amazing dexterity together. It was his sister who was the intended partner for Mozarts E-flat Major Concerto for Two Pianos, but it turned out to be one of his students, Josepha Auernhammer, who joined Wolfgang for the works premiere.The obstacles of such a cooperative concerto are considerable. Though not as strong or powerful as todays pianos, two keyboards of Mozarts time would still be enough to drown out the classical-sized orchestra. As well, thought must be put to the virtuoso considerations of each piano part, so as to put them on equal footing with each other. The word that one reads time after time in descriptions of this concerto is seamless. The piano parts intermingle and weave around each other with such utter smoothness that it is nearly impossible to tell which piano is playing exactly what part.The E-flat Major home key lends a sense of strength and verve to the opening orchestral statement, an ambitious one both in terms of its length and the number of musical ideas it puts forth. The pianos enter together, a sparkling new take on the opening theme, with neither piano part over-shadowing the other. In fact, the two keyboards have the advantage of some surprising harmonies and unexpected turns of phrase during their extended opening passage. While there are moments of contrast, occasional darker tones, the main material of the opening dominates the long first movement, with Mozart brilliantly finding new ways for both orchestra and pianos to expound upon it. A dashing cadenza for both pianos deftly alternates dark and light elements.The second movement begins as a slow, tender Minuet in the orchestra. The pianos enter rhapsodically, each nudging the other along in an alternat-ing dialogue. The orchestras gentle rhythms join, and the musics hushed, unhurried beauty is beguiling. Listen particularly in the middle section of this eight-minute movement for some unexpectedly dissonant leaps and chords in the pianos solo flights of fancy. The work ends on a hushed orchestral cadence.The finale is a vigorous and excitable Rondo, again with the orchestra given the first say. The music for the pianos is effervescent and marvelously balanced; the contrasting sections in between restatements of the main theme often take surprising twists and turns, mostly stemming from the unusual chord which finishes each statement of the main theme. With the previous Piano Concerto No. 9 Jeunehomme and Concerto No. 10 for Two Pianos, Mozart showed a new maturity and mastery of form that would colour his concerto output from then on. Program notes 2013 by D.T. BakerWTIsignature 29september/november 2013Signature1_2013_p26-29.indd 29 9/6/13 12:23:24 PMora Bumanis has been Principal Harp of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra since 1980. She is a graduate of the University of Toronto, where she studied with Judy Loman. In addition to her busy orchestral sched-ule, Ms. Bumanis is much in demand as a soloist, recitalist, and teacher. She has performed with most of the leading Canadian symphony orchestras, as well as the National Ballet and Canadian Opera Orchestras. Nora Bumanis has given many recitals throughout North America and Europe. She is also in great demand as a chamber musician and has frequently been broadcast on CBC radio and TV.Ms. Bumanis teaches at the University of Alberta and Alberta College Conservatory. She was on the faculty of the International Youth Orches-tra Festival in Banff. She was Managing Director of the Jasper Festival of Music and Wine from 2000 - 2003, and has been a frequent performer at the Festival of the Sound in Parry Sound, Ontario. Nora Bumanis and Julia Shaw began their collaboration as Canadas first professional harp duo in 1988. They have recorded five CDs and performed extensively throughout Canada. She was Global TVs Woman of Vision in February 2009 and is an active member of the Edmonton Glenora Rotary Club.Ms. Bumanis last appeared as a soloist with the ESO in September 2012.true Alberta girl, ElizaBEth FaulknEr has grown into an accomplished flute dignitary for the Wild Rose Province. She acquired a music degree with distinction from the University of Alberta, and after playing as the Principal Flute for the Edmonton Youth Orchestra, she has progressed to play as Acting Principal Flute for the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra and the Principal Flute for the Red Deer Symphony Orchestra. Playing for the National Ceremonial Guard, Ms. Faulkner has helped represent Canada to royalty, foreign emissaries, national, and international leaders. Locally, she has performed numerous solos with various ensembles (Alberta Baroque Ensemble, Pro Coro Canada, and more), and works for Music Services International Ltd. as their first flute for Citadel Theatre productions.Elizabeth Faulkner is also an accomplished flute teacher, with an education degree in music. She has taught flute at the Kings University College, North American Baptist College (now Taylor Seminary), and Northwest Bible College. Furthermore, she was employed by the Alberta Distance Learning Centre as the principal editor for the develop-ment of their music program. Her other loves include her husband and two children.Ms. Faulkner last appeared with the ESO as a soloist in Symphony Under the Sky 2011.ike many musicians, sarah tako began her musical studies at the piano, studying with Inese Krievans from the age of four. She also studied oboe for nearly five years with Stacy Kern, a wood-wind specialist. After hearing her teacher play, she fell in love with the rich, lyrical, and sometimes humorous sound of the bassoon, which became her primary instru-ment. Ms. Tako recently graduated from Mahtomedi High School in Mahtomedi, Minnesota, having taken many of her classes at the University of Minnesota. She studied bassoon and participated in mas-terclasses and reed-making classes with John Miller, and Norbert Nielubowski, Principal and second bassoonists of the Minnesota Orchestra, respectively. She also participated in masterclasses with bassoonist Frank Morelli of the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra and Per Hannevold, of the Bergen Philharmonic. Sarah Tako was a member of the Minnesota Youth Symphonies for seven seasons and recently performed the first movement of Mozarts Bassoon Concerto with the MYS Symphony Orchestra. She also performed the con-certo with the Minneapolis Pops Orchestra in July 2013. She was awarded Outstanding Woodwind student and performed the Weber Bassoon Con-certo at the Birch Creek Performance Center in Door County, Wisconsin, in 2011. She has been a featured artist on Minnesota Public Radio program Minnesota Varsity, where she recorded Gabriel Piernes Solo de Concert. She also performed this piece on air at the Fitzgerald Theater in downtown Saint Paul. In addition to bassoon, Ms. Tako enjoys playing the piano, studying music theory, and teaching children both bassoon and piano. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her family, friends, and dogs, swing dancing, swimming, and listening to an eclectic variety of music. She is currently studying bassoon performance as a freshman at the Curtis Insti-tute of Music in Philadelphia with Daniel Matsukawa, principal bassoonist of the Philadelphia Orchestra.This is Ms. Takos debut with the ESO.music oF WolFgang amad mozart(b. Salzburg, 1756 / d. Vienna, 1791)Bassoon Concerto in B-flat Major, K.191/186eManuscript dated June 4, 1774 in SalzburgLast ESO performance: May 1994ozarts lonE Bassoon concErto is not only thE first non-piano concerto he composed, but also one of the earliest concertos he wrote at all. He was eighteen years old when he put the date of June 4, 1774, on the manuscript, but by then, he was already a veteran musician, and a well-travelled one at that. Its likely that he had a particular musician in mind for this unique concerto; who exactly that was remains a mystery.While adhering to a familiar format in design, the Bassoon Concerto still brims with Mozartean grace, and absolutely mastery of that design. P R O G R A M N O T E SPROGRAM NOTESMNAL2013/2014 SEA-Friday Masters & LandMarK CLassiC Masters Masterful MozartSiGNATuRE www.Edmontonsymphony.com28Signature1_2013_p26-29.indd 28 9/6/13 12:22:56 PMS Date: SaturDay, January 12, 2013name: ron & Carole miDDletonHow long have you attended the ESO?Carole: We moved here in 1976 and started attending the symphony.Ron: We started subscribing after our first year attending, so since 1977.Do you play, or have you ever played, an instrument?Ron & Carole: Yes! (in unison)Ron: Clarinet for me.Carole: Piano. I briefly played the organ also.If you could learn to play an instrument, which would it be?Ron: I was always somewhat interested in the English Horn.Carole: For me, the piano was always the one I wanted to play.Name two things you always bring to an ESO concert.Ron: Just the tickets usually!Carole: And a little preparation. We try to listen to the music before we attend the concert.What does your typical concert night look like? Do you have a tradition?Carole: Years ago we used to go to dinner before each concert, but not usually anymore. Now we eat at home and come early to the symphony to attend the preludes prior to our show.Ron: And, of course, to get a good parking spot!What is your favourite pre-concert drink?Ron: I go for the dark coffee.Carole: I always buy hot chocolate.If you could meet any musician, dead or alive, any genre of music who would it be?Ron: For me it would be Maurice Ravel. Carole: Mozart immediately jumped into my mind.What is your funniest memory associated with the ESO or the Winspear Centre?Carole: Im picturing that concert where Bill Eddins showed up dressed as Mozart. We also loved when the program listed a certain William McEddins. We had a good laugh at that one!Ron: *Nods.*When you turn on your radio, CD player, or MP3 playlist, whats playing right now?Ron: The last CD I put in was Rachmaninoff. Carole: Yes, I believe its coming up later in the season so we like to listen to it before we go to the concert.What is your favourite genre of music today? What did you listen to when you were a teenager?Ron: Folk music. Bob Dylan of course.Carole: I listened to quite a bit of classical while I was growing up and learning the piano. But on the radio it was pop like the Beatles and Joni Mitchell. Life is Carole: like a box of chocolates! Oh, isnt that a clich. Life is good.Ron: yes. That is living in the moment. Music isRon: the soul of life.Carole: inspiring and moving.Happiness is Ron: sharing music.Carole: petting our cat.What is your favourite ESO or Winspear Centre memory?Ron: When we were invited to sit in on the Young Composers workshop with Robert Rival.Carole: The thing that pops into my head is when we come to a concert and I find a flower sitting on my chair for being a long-term subscriber. I really liked that! Warranty expired - now its your choice!`U7UiVi`iiU U*ViU6>}iStorieS from the Audiencewww.edmontonSymphony.comSignature1_2013_p30-33.indd 30 9/6/13 12:24:37 PMJoin us for a free tour of the Winspear Centre as We Celebrate our 15th anniversary! Dates: Tuesday, September 17th Wednesday, October 9th Friday, October 18th Monday, November 4th Wednesday, November 20thCome hear all about the history of the ESO and Winspear Centre and our vision for the communi-ty. We will provide a complimentary lunch followed by a backstage tour of one of North Americas most exquisite concert halls! We all have busy schedules, which is why we promise to keep this session to one hour from 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm.ThESE EvENTS Fill up FAST SO iF yOu WOulD likE TO ATTEND plEASE R.S.v.p. TO JEFFORy MAgSON AT 780-401-2517 OR jmagson@winspearcentre.com. Overture InfOrmatIOn SeSSIOn & tOurWhat is your Winspear?The Winspear Centre is Edmontons pride and joy and is recognized around the world as an outstanding concert hall. it is a centre for music, for arts and culture. The Winspear brings people together and gives our community soul.please consider donating $10 per month to My Winspear. you will receive a My Winspear T-shirt with a custom slogan of your choice. let everyone know what the Winspear means to you!your monthly support Will: become part of a community-wide sustainable funding source for the Winspear and help maintain its standing as a world-class facility help provide more opportunities for music, dance and other community groups to make the Winspear Centre a performance or event home make the performing arts and the joy of music more accessible to our community, now and into the future help maintain the Symphonys home and allow it to continue developing its artistic excellence.Erin Mulcair 9720 102 Avenue Edmonton, AB T5J 4B2MAil giFTS TO: givE ONliNE AT: www.winspearcentre.com/supportSignature1_2013_p30-33.indd 31 9/6/13 1:11:38 PMS Date: SaturDay, January 12, 2013name: ron & Carole miDDletonHow long have you attended the ESO?Carole: We moved here in 1976 and started attending the symphony.Ron: We started subscribing after our first year attending, so since 1977.Do you play, or have you ever played, an instrument?Ron & Carole: Yes! (in unison)Ron: Clarinet for me.Carole: Piano. I briefly played the organ also.If you could learn to play an instrument, which would it be?Ron: I was always somewhat interested in the English Horn.Carole: For me, the piano was always the one I wanted to play.Name two things you always bring to an ESO concert.Ron: Just the tickets usually!Carole: And a little preparation. We try to listen to the music before we attend the concert.What does your typical concert night look like? Do you have a tradition?Carole: Years ago we used to go to dinner before each concert, but not usually anymore. Now we eat at home and come early to the symphony to attend the preludes prior to our show.Ron: And, of course, to get a good parking spot!What is your favourite pre-concert drink?Ron: I go for the dark coffee.Carole: I always buy hot chocolate.If you could meet any musician, dead or alive, any genre of music who would it be?Ron: For me it would be Maurice Ravel. Carole: Mozart immediately jumped into my mind.What is your funniest memory associated with the ESO or the Winspear Centre?Carole: Im picturing that concert where Bill Eddins showed up dressed as Mozart. We also loved when the program listed a certain William McEddins. We had a good laugh at that one!Ron: *Nods.*When you turn on your radio, CD player, or MP3 playlist, whats playing right now?Ron: The last CD I put in was Rachmaninoff. Carole: Yes, I believe its coming up later in the season so we like to listen to it before we go to the concert.What is your favourite genre of music today? What did you listen to when you were a teenager?Ron: Folk music. Bob Dylan of course.Carole: I listened to quite a bit of classical while I was growing up and learning the piano. But on the radio it was pop like the Beatles and Joni Mitchell. Life is Carole: like a box of chocolates! Oh, isnt that a clich. Life is good.Ron: yes. That is living in the moment. Music isRon: the soul of life.Carole: inspiring and moving.Happiness is Ron: sharing music.Carole: petting our cat.What is your favourite ESO or Winspear Centre memory?Ron: When we were invited to sit in on the Young Composers workshop with Robert Rival.Carole: The thing that pops into my head is when we come to a concert and I find a flower sitting on my chair for being a long-term subscriber. I really liked that! Warranty expired - now its your choice!`U7UiVi`iiU U*ViU6>}iStorieS from the Audiencewww.edmontonSymphony.comSignature1_2013_p30-33.indd 30 9/6/13 12:24:37 PMSName: Jacob & marilyN eNs Date: thursDay, December 20, 2012How long have you attended the ESO?Jacob: Ive been coming since university. Its been at least 40 years. I started going when the Orchestra was playing in the Capital Theatre.Marilyn: I started attending in 1956 when Jake and I were married. Do you play, or have you ever played, an instrument?Jacob: Harmonica!If you could learn to play an instrument, which would it be?Marilyn: PianoJacob: ViolinName 2 things you always bring to an ESO concert.Jacob: Our ticketsMarilyn: Candies. We find that it sometimes gets a little dry in the chamber.What does your typical concert night look like? Do you have a tradition?Marilyn: We typically arrive early to make sure that we have a parking spot. What is your favourite pre-concert drink?Jacob: Cappuccino.Marilyn: Hot spiced apple cider when its available.If you could meet any musician, dead or alive, any genre of music who would it be?Jacob: Mozart and Irving BerlinMarilyn: Beethoven or BrahmsWhat is your funniest memory associated with the ESO or the Winspear Centre?Marilyn: We really enjoy Bob Bernhardts humour!Jacob: We also loved it when John Estacio and Alan Gilliland asked questions and ran up and down the aisle in tutus and wigs during Symphony Under the Sky!When you turn on your radio, CD player, or MP3 playlist, whats playing right now?Jacob: CBC FM, CKUA. Whatever is in our CD player at the time.What is your favourite genre of music today? What did you listen to when you were a teenager?Marilyn: When I was a teenager, we listened to whatever the hit song was at that time.Jacob: Dean Martin, Carmen Mcrae, Louis Armstrong.Whats your theme song?Jacob: My Way Frank SinatraMarilyn: Blue Canadian Rockies Jim ReevesLife is Jacob & Marilyn: a bowl of cherries (unison).Music isMarilyn: a necessary thing. Happiness is Jacob: having a good game of golf! Marilyn: whenever things are going right! What is your favourite ESO or Winspear Centre memory?Jacob: Whenever there is a concert that features Angela Cheng or Jens Lindemann.Marilyn: All of the concerts!StorieS from the Audiencewww.edmontonsymphony.comSignature1_2013_p30-33.indd 32 9/6/13 12:28:39 PMWe go with my sister and husband, and for as long as weve been members we have had dinner together before the concert.Happiness is Richard: family. Thats the glue.Barbara: 50 years of marriage!What is your favourite ESO or Winspear Centre memory?Richard: When David Hoyt conducted. Anytime you combine the orchestra with choirs. I also enjoyed when the Canadian Brass came and played. Oh, and Rita MacNeil. Barbara: The Simon and Garfunkel concert. And the Beatles concert too. I can only recall the more recent concerts! (laughs)Richard: John McDermott was very memorable as well.We apologize that this interview was published with the incorrect photo in April 2013. Name: RichaRd & BaRBaRa BakeRHow long have you attended the ESO?Barbara: Well, we went to the Jubilee for five years.Richard: So around 20 years to the Pops.Do you play, or have you ever played, an instrument?Richard: In high school I used to sing. I was in the University of Alberta Mixed Chorus.Barbara: I play the piano.If you could learn to play another instrument, which would it be?Richard: For me it would have to be the organ.Barbara: Maybe the harp? What does your typical concert night look like? Do you have a tradition?Barbara: We do! We go with my sister and husband, and for as long as weve been members we have had dinner together before the concert.Richard: Yep, ever since we started.What is your favourite pre-concert drink?Barbara: Whatever we have with dinnerRichard: which is usually a white wine.If you could meet any musician, dead or alive, any genre of music who would it be?Richard: Bill Eddins is quite inspiring! Id love to meet him. Barbara: k.d. lang. Id probably choose her.What is your funniest memory associated with the ESO or the Winspear Centre?Richard: When Bill Eddins interacted with Measha Brueggergosman at the Gala. They were quite funny.Barbara: In general when Bill Eddins conducts that Pops. He always brings the humour which I enjoy.What is your favourite genre of music today? What did you listen to when you were a teenager?Richard: I can never remember. Well in my teenage years I would listen to Elvis and the Beatles.Barbara: Elvis for me too. The Platters and Patti Page too.Whats your theme song?Richard: What a Wonderful World.Barbara: We always turn up the radio whenever the Jupiter movement from Gustav Holsts Planets comes on the radio.Richard: Yes, thats right.Life is Richard: good!Barbara: a bowl of cherries.Music isRichard: spiritual. Music heals the soul.Barbara: inspiring.date: FRiday, decemBeR 21, 2012If you have a story you would like to share or would like to be interviewed for Stories From the Audience, please contact Erin Mulcair at 780-401-2539 or emulcair@winspearcentre.comsignature 33september/november 2013Signature1_2013_p30-33.indd 33 9/6/13 12:29:26 PMSName: Jacob & marilyN eNs Date: thursDay, December 20, 2012How long have you attended the ESO?Jacob: Ive been coming since university. Its been at least 40 years. I started going when the Orchestra was playing in the Capital Theatre.Marilyn: I started attending in 1956 when Jake and I were married. Do you play, or have you ever played, an instrument?Jacob: Harmonica!If you could learn to play an instrument, which would it be?Marilyn: PianoJacob: ViolinName 2 things you always bring to an ESO concert.Jacob: Our ticketsMarilyn: Candies. We find that it sometimes gets a little dry in the chamber.What does your typical concert night look like? Do you have a tradition?Marilyn: We typically arrive early to make sure that we have a parking spot. What is your favourite pre-concert drink?Jacob: Cappuccino.Marilyn: Hot spiced apple cider when its available.If you could meet any musician, dead or alive, any genre of music who would it be?Jacob: Mozart and Irving BerlinMarilyn: Beethoven or BrahmsWhat is your funniest memory associated with the ESO or the Winspear Centre?Marilyn: We really enjoy Bob Bernhardts humour!Jacob: We also loved it when John Estacio and Alan Gilliland asked questions and ran up and down the aisle in tutus and wigs during Symphony Under the Sky!When you turn on your radio, CD player, or MP3 playlist, whats playing right now?Jacob: CBC FM, CKUA. Whatever is in our CD player at the time.What is your favourite genre of music today? What did you listen to when you were a teenager?Marilyn: When I was a teenager, we listened to whatever the hit song was at that time.Jacob: Dean Martin, Carmen Mcrae, Louis Armstrong.Whats your theme song?Jacob: My Way Frank SinatraMarilyn: Blue Canadian Rockies Jim ReevesLife is Jacob & Marilyn: a bowl of cherries (unison).Music isMarilyn: a necessary thing. Happiness is Jacob: having a good game of golf! Marilyn: whenever things are going right! What is your favourite ESO or Winspear Centre memory?Jacob: Whenever there is a concert that features Angela Cheng or Jens Lindemann.Marilyn: All of the concerts!StorieS from the Audiencewww.edmontonsymphony.comSignature1_2013_p30-33.indd 32 9/6/13 12:28:39 PMTBOARD & STAFFTHE EdmonTon SympHony orcHESTraList of past Board ChairsMrs. Marion Mills 1952-53 dr. h.V. rice 1953-54Mr. John d. dower 1954-56Mr. Gerry M. Wilmot 1956-57dr. a.o. Minsos 1957-58Mr. E.M. Blanchard 1958-59Mr. a.G. Culver 1959-60Mr. d.d. Campbell 1960-61Mr. d.M. ramsay 1961-62Mr. Merrill E. Wolfe 1962-63Mr. Ken r. higham 1963-65Mr. George M. peacock, Q.C. 1965-66Mr. robert L. horley 1966-67the honourable david C. Mcdonald 1967-68Mrs. Madeline Williams 1968-69the honourable tevie h. Miller 1969-70Mr. Jack W. Kennedy 1970-71the honourable roger p. Kerans 1971-72Mr. richard W. palmer 1972-73dr. John r. huckell 1973-76dr. John L. schlosser 1976-77Mr. J.r. singleton 1977-79Mr. d.a. Cox 1979-80Mr. ron ritch 1980-82Mrs. Margaret Clarke 1982-84Mr. Brian hetherington 1984-86Mr. Charles t. austin 1986-88Mr. Neil Wilkinson 1988-90Mr. robert Binnendyk 1990-93Mr. ron pearson 1993-95Ms. audrey Luft 1995-97Mr. andrew hladyshevsky, Q.C. 1997-00Mr. douglas Noble 2000-01Mr. d. Mark Gunderson, Q.C. 2001-03Mr. W.d. (Bill) Grace, f.C.a. 2003-04Mrs. phyllis Clark 2004-07Mr. steven Lepoole 2007-11Edmonton Symphony SociEty/ FranciS WinSpEar cEntrE For muSic EdMoNtoN syMphoNy & CoNCErt haLL fouNdatioNphyllis Clark, chairJohn BrennanJim CarterBob Kamp ron NewGary smithBoard of dirECtorsJim E. Carter, p.Eng., chairreginald Milley, Vice chairsteven Lepoole, past chairCynthia hansen, C.a., treasurer Brian W. summers, LL. B., Secretary/Legal counselBart Becker, p.Eng.Carolyn CampbellMaria david-EvansMegan Evanspeggy GarrittyBill harrisontravis huckellLeanne Krawchuk, LL.B. Carol ann Kushlyk, C.M.a., C.f.E.ron New, C.a.rhonda taftEXECutiVE & artistiC LEadErshipannemarie petrov William EddinsExecutive director artistic directorrob Mcalear, director of artistic operationsMichael schurek, director of community relationsalison Kenny-Gardhouse, director of Educational outreachally Mandrusiak, director of Events managementBarbara foley, director of Finance & administrationElaine Warick, director of patron developmentMaryGrace Johnston, Executive coordinator/ Board LiaisonWWW.EdmontonSymphony.comthE Eso aNd WiNspEar CENtrE WorK iN proud partNErship With iatsE LoCaL 210Warren Bertholet, head Lighting technicianrob hadfield, head audio technicianalan Marks, head of Stage managementMike patton, assistant head of Stage managementSignATuRe www.EdmontonSymphony.com34Edmonton Symphony orchEStra / WinSpEar cEntrESignature1_2013_p34-35.indd 34 9/6/13 12:31:03 PMTTHANK YOU Community Support of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra & Winspear CentreThe Edmonton Symphony Orchestra is a registered charitable organization, incorporated under the Societies Act of the Province of Alberta on November 22, 1952. As Canadas fourth-largest professional orchestra, the ESO is financed by ticket sales, grants from government agencies, and by contributions from corporations, foundations, and individuals.Our Media SponsorsSponsor 2 for 1 Introductory Series OfferSponsor K to Gr. 3 Education ProgramSponsor Musicians in the MakingOur Program and Education SponsorsSeries SponsorsSponsor Gr. 4 to 6 Education ProgramNaming SponsorENMAX Hallthrough the Edmonton Community FoundationOur Performance SponsorsCityTV Capital FM Global CKUA Edmonton Journal Pattison VUE Weekly World FMOur Exclusive CaterersOur SuppliersPresenting Co-SponsorChristmas at the WinspearPresenting Co-SponsorChristmas at the WinspearSponsorPulse8Print Sponsor Wine Supplier Official Airline of the ESOPublications Sponsor Official Floral SupplierGovernment Agency Support:Title Sponsor Landmark Classic MastersTitle SponsorRobbins Pops / Robbins Lighter ClassicsTitle Sponsor Symphony Under the SkyTitle SponsorAir Canada PresentsTitle Sponsor Esso Symphony for KidsSponsor Friday Masters Title Sponsor Late Night with Bill EddinsEdmonton Symphony orchEStra / WinSpEar cEntrESignature1_2013_p34-35.indd 35 2013-09-06 1:24 PMTBOARD & STAFFTHE EdmonTon SympHony orcHESTraList of past Board ChairsMrs. Marion Mills 1952-53 dr. h.V. rice 1953-54Mr. John d. dower 1954-56Mr. Gerry M. Wilmot 1956-57dr. a.o. Minsos 1957-58Mr. E.M. Blanchard 1958-59Mr. a.G. Culver 1959-60Mr. d.d. Campbell 1960-61Mr. d.M. ramsay 1961-62Mr. Merrill E. Wolfe 1962-63Mr. Ken r. higham 1963-65Mr. George M. peacock, Q.C. 1965-66Mr. robert L. horley 1966-67the honourable david C. Mcdonald 1967-68Mrs. Madeline Williams 1968-69the honourable tevie h. Miller 1969-70Mr. Jack W. Kennedy 1970-71the honourable roger p. Kerans 1971-72Mr. richard W. palmer 1972-73dr. John r. huckell 1973-76dr. John L. schlosser 1976-77Mr. J.r. singleton 1977-79Mr. d.a. Cox 1979-80Mr. ron ritch 1980-82Mrs. Margaret Clarke 1982-84Mr. Brian hetherington 1984-86Mr. Charles t. austin 1986-88Mr. Neil Wilkinson 1988-90Mr. robert Binnendyk 1990-93Mr. ron pearson 1993-95Ms. audrey Luft 1995-97Mr. andrew hladyshevsky, Q.C. 1997-00Mr. douglas Noble 2000-01Mr. d. Mark Gunderson, Q.C. 2001-03Mr. W.d. (Bill) Grace, f.C.a. 2003-04Mrs. phyllis Clark 2004-07Mr. steven Lepoole 2007-11Edmonton Symphony SociEty/ FranciS WinSpEar cEntrE For muSic EdMoNtoN syMphoNy & CoNCErt haLL fouNdatioNphyllis Clark, chairJohn BrennanJim CarterBob Kamp ron NewGary smithBoard of dirECtorsJim E. Carter, p.Eng., chairreginald Milley, Vice chairsteven Lepoole, past chairCynthia hansen, C.a., treasurer Brian W. summers, LL. B., Secretary/Legal counselBart Becker, p.Eng.Carolyn CampbellMaria david-EvansMegan Evanspeggy GarrittyBill harrisontravis huckellLeanne Krawchuk, LL.B. Carol ann Kushlyk, C.M.a., C.f.E.ron New, C.a.rhonda taftEXECutiVE & artistiC LEadErshipannemarie petrov William EddinsExecutive director artistic directorrob Mcalear, director of artistic operationsMichael schurek, director of community relationsalison Kenny-Gardhouse, director of Educational outreachally Mandrusiak, director of Events managementBarbara foley, director of Finance & administrationElaine Warick, director of patron developmentMaryGrace Johnston, Executive coordinator/ Board LiaisonWWW.EdmontonSymphony.comthE Eso aNd WiNspEar CENtrE WorK iN proud partNErship With iatsE LoCaL 210Warren Bertholet, head Lighting technicianrob hadfield, head audio technicianalan Marks, head of Stage managementMike patton, assistant head of Stage managementSignATuRe www.EdmontonSymphony.com34Edmonton Symphony orchEStra / WinSpEar cEntrESignature1_2013_p34-35.indd 34 9/6/13 12:31:03 PMwww.lexusofedmonton.ca Conveniently located on 170 St 780-466-8300 *Prices and payments subject to change without notice. Contact Lexus of Edmonton for complete details.IS2014250$43,002*Well Equipped From: 2014 IS 250 HIGHLIGHTSHID HeadlampsSmart key system with push button startPerforated, heated front seatsDrive mode selectIncludes freight/PDI and block heater$5,000* $455*Down PaymentSecurity deposit waivedMonthly Lease Payment3.9%*Lease for 48 months2.9%**Finance for 24 monthsALL-NEW LEXUS ISIT CUT ITS TEETH ON THE TRACK, WHICH EXPLAINS ITS BITECome feel the difference! LEXUS OF EDMONTON IS PROUD TO SPONSOR THE EDMONTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 000Sig-Lexus-FP.indd 1 8/20/13 2:01:15 PMSignature1_2013_p36-01.indd 36 9/6/13 12:33:04 PM