Make it Fun to Get Started

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    17-Oct-2014

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DESCRIPTION

Quick introduction to gamification terminology and concepts, in the context of marketing. Includes next steps for deeper dive and gamification implementation.

Transcript

<p>Make it Easy Funto Get StartedThe ABCs of Gamification</p> <p>Gamification is not...</p> <p> Crappy badges on a crappy website Fix for shady product or experience Fix for poor understanding of customers &amp; </p> <p>prospects Actual games</p> <p>Gamification is...</p> <p>The use of game elements and game-design techniques in non-game contexts.</p> <p> Multiplier "Fun theory" Next step in evolution of marketing Engaging experiences Spirit of a game Fun is job #1</p> <p>Anything can be made fun</p> <p>goo.gl/pNGhC</p> <p>"Everything in the future online is going to look like a multiplayer game."</p> <p>Eric SchmidtGoogle Chairman</p> <p>Internet Goes MMOG</p> <p>Game Design to Drive</p> <p> Mass Change</p> <p>Game Mechanics</p> <p>Game DesignThinking</p> <p>Sociological Motivators in Game Design</p> <p>The Gamification Onion</p> <p>Mindset Shift</p> <p>Prospects &amp; Customers=</p> <p>Players</p> <p>Player Types (Bartle's)AchieversDefined by:A focus on attaining status and achieving preset goals quickly and/or completely.</p> <p>Engaged by:Achievements</p> <p>Typical makeup: 10%</p> <p>SocializersDefined by:A focus on socializing and a drive to develop a network of friends and contacts.</p> <p>Engaged by:Newsfeeds, Friends, Lists, Chat</p> <p>Typical makeup: 75%</p> <p>KillersDefined by:A focus on winning, rank, and direct peer-to-peer competition.</p> <p>Engaged by:Leaderboards, Ranks</p> <p>Typical makeup: 5%</p> <p>ExplorersDefined by:A focus on exploring and a drive to discover the unknown.</p> <p>Engaged by:Hidden Achievements</p> <p>Typical makeup: 10%</p> <p>Gamer Psychology Quiz</p> <p>Explorer: 74%Achiever: 66%Socializer: 60%Killer: 7%</p> <p>goo.gl/fnQN3</p> <p>Mindset Shift</p> <p>Extrinsic Rewards Intrinsic Value</p> <p>AmyJoKim.com</p> <p>Game Design to Drive</p> <p> Mass Change</p> <p>Game Mechanics</p> <p>Game DesignThinking</p> <p>Sociological Motivators in Game Design</p> <p>Game Mechanics</p> <p>Badges</p> <p>LevelsLeaderboards</p> <p>ChallengesRewards</p> <p>Onboarding Incentive Loops</p> <p>Points</p> <p>Types of Points</p> <p>Experience: most important, earned for every action, may expire, never go down, not redeemed (always goes up, keep earning)Redeemable: goes up &amp; down, redeemable for goods (ie. bank balance)Skill-based: assigned to specific activities that are tangential to XP or tangential to redemptionKarma: sole purpose is to be given them away, get no benefit from keeping them (ie. voting system)Reputation: often most complex, incorporate a number of different things, used when a system can't verify trust</p> <p>Why Badges</p> <p>Collecting: historically badges were a collection mechanismSurprise/pleasure: "awesome, I earned a badge"Visually valuable: aesthetically pleasing, people can want them because they look goodSocial promotion: opportunity for a user to promote your product in the social graph, "I'm gonna share this with others"Goals &amp; progress: can be a progress mechanic</p> <p>Levels</p> <p>Progression of difficulty (don't slam them up front)Difficulty from level to level is not linear, usually exponential up front and then decreasing over time</p> <p>Reward Intervals</p> <p>Fixed Ratio: given after a fixed number of actions Variable ratio: given after an unknown number of actions</p> <p>Challenges</p> <p>Aligned with levels and experience pointsMaintain "Flow" - balance between ability level and challenge(Treasure hunt)</p> <p>Leaderboard Tips</p> <p>Always put the user in middle of the leaderboardShow friends above and below themShow them a specific instruction on what they can do to move up</p> <p>Incentive Loop Tips</p> <p>(Viral loop)Evolve through levelsBe deliberate &amp; focused: how to get users into the experience, what keeps them engaged, and how to bring them back</p> <p>ie. connecting &amp; expressing &gt; tweet &gt; @mentions &gt; followers &gt; rinse &amp; repeat</p> <p>Onboarding</p> <p>First minute is the most importantMinimize choiceSlowly reveal complexity of system to userDon't explain, experienceOffer benefits first, then ask for registration (give them something for free first, RIA)</p> <p>ExamplesXbox.com/live: achievements, leaderboardsFourSquare.com: badges, rewardsGetGlue.com: rewardsLinkedIn.com: progress barSalesForce.com: leaderboard, achievements, levelingMint.com: achievements, progress barCheckPoints.com: virtual currency, rewardsShopKick.com: virtual currency, rewards, contestsHallmark.com: Facebook credits, virtual goods, gifting, sharingStarbucks.com: leveling, rewardsNike.com: achievements, badges, challenges, rewardsBuffaloWildWings.com: trivia, challenges</p> <p>Service Providers</p> <p>Bigdoor.comBunchball.comBadgeville.comiActionable.comGigya.com</p> <p>Gabe Zichermann</p> <p>goo.gl/xW9Bj</p> <p>Game Design to Drive</p> <p> Mass Change</p> <p>Game Mechanics</p> <p>Game DesignThinking</p> <p>Sociological Motivators in Game Design</p> <p>Kevin Werbach</p> <p>goo.gl/l07iw</p> <p>Game Design to Drive</p> <p> Mass Change</p> <p>Game Mechanics</p> <p>Game DesignThinking</p> <p>Sociological Motivators in Game Design</p> <p>Will Wright</p> <p>goo.gl/WfNim</p> <p>Game Design to Drive</p> <p> Mass Change</p> <p>Game Mechanics</p> <p>Game DesignThinking</p> <p>Sociological Motivators in Game Design</p> <p>Jane McGonigal</p> <p>goo.gl/fe9C5</p> <p>Fun is Job #1</p>