Let's Get to Work

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Beth Swedeen, Lisa Pugh and Russell McCullough gave this presentation on May 30, 2012 at the National Transition Conference in Washington, DC.

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  • 1. Wisconsins Lets Get to Work:A Policy and Practice Approach for LaunchingYouth into the Work ForceBeth Swedeen & Lisa Pugh May 30, 2012

2. Learning Objectives Use evidence-based and promising practices at thelocal and systemic level to measure employmentoutcomes Identify policy and practice barriers Identify practical strategies for engaging policymakers 3. Project framework includes all stakeholders:Combines what research/data shows are: Most significant barriers; Strategies and practices that work; policies that act as both facilitators and barriers toemployment. 4. Project framework includes all stakeholders: School staff Service agencies: VocRehab; Long-term caresystem Students Families Broader community(including employers) 5. Four project components Statewide consortium Pilot schools On-site coaches Policy team 6. Consortiums Role Large: includes representation from allstakeholders, 60-70 people Provides input on what is and isnt working, whatdirections to pursue; what policies need to change orimprove Includes progress updates from schools and threestate agencies on progress: practice and policychanges 7. Pilot Schools Did a statewide competitive application reviewed byall six major partners (3 state agencies; 3 ADDpartners) Looked for interest/ability to develop a broaderstakeholder group in their school and community Had to commit to implement evidence-based orpromising practices 8. Practices: Person-centered planning School/community mapping of opportunities Connection general education and co-curricular activities Summer paid/volunteer community-based jobs Early connection to DVR Engaging broader community through a CommunityConversation School learning circle/community of practice to learn fromeach other 9. Russells Story Person-centered planning School/community mapping of opportunities Connection general education and co-curricularactivities Summer paid/volunteer community-based jobs 10. How I got my jobs 11. As a young student, I really liked riding the bus 12. In high school I really enjoyed hanging out with friends 13. My current position at BPDD 14. Always wanted to be a driver 15. Coaches On-site supporters/cheerleaders/practitioners whoshow school staff how to try new practices Provide resources and direct instruction training Connect them to other professionaldevelopment, training and resources 16. Policy Team Members What it does 17. Policy Barriers: DVR Too many facility-basedassessments for youth Lack experience andcomfort in supportingindividuals withsignificantdisabilities, both amongcounselors andprovider networks 18. DVR Policy Solutions Guidance to staff and the public from DVR leadershipon community-based assessments Youth Transition On the Job Training (OJT) Strengthening statewide training to new/existing DVRstaff on how to support individuals with the mostcomplex disabilities (assumption that all areemployable) 19. DPI Policy Barriers No clear guidance onLRE for youth intransition (ages 18-21) Inadequate pre-service preparation intransition 20. Long-Term Care Policy Barriers Lack of competitiveemployment focus in long-termcare system Lack of understanding aboutthe impact of employment onpublic benefits 21. Long-Term Care Policy Solutions Changes to provider rates tocreate incentives foremployment outcomes (payfor performance) Increased focus onemployment in managed carecontract language 22. Long-Term Care Policy Solutions Creating mentoring opportunitiesamong providers Pursuing a pre-voc policy thatwould prohibit/limit new entriesto facility-based pre-voc Embed benefits counseling traininginto statewide long-term caresystem parent training and havebenefits counseling expertiseavailable at ADRCs 23. Practical Strategies for Engaging Policymakers Making a solid case for change: using data, researchto create targeted asks Focus on policymakers own interests (play the players against each other) Dont take no for an answer: go to the next level Look at what is happening in the general populationof youth regarding employment in your state Help policymakers make connections Work in coalitions: create a buzz 24. Beth Swedeen, WI-BPDDbeth.swedeen@wisconsin.govLisa Pugh, ADD Public Policy Coordinatorlisa.pugh@drwi.org