Discovering What Good Looks Like with Clean Language, Agendashift and Cynefin

  • Published on
    12-Apr-2017

  • View
    405

  • Download
    1

Transcript

  • A proud member of the

    with Clean Language, Agendashift and Cynefin

    Lean Agile Scotland #lascot16

    Discovering What Good Looks Like

    Copyright 2015-2016 Agendashift (a trading name of Positive Incline Ltd). All rights reserved.

    For further information about this material, see www.agendashift.com/partner and www.agendashift.com/partner_licence

  • Mike BurrowsEmail: mike@agendashift.comTwitter: @asplake, @agendashift, @KanbanInsideBlog: positiveincline.com, blog.agendashift.com

    Author, Kanban from the Inside Brickell Key Community Contribution Award 2014 Former Executive Director and global development

    manager, then IT Director

    Interim delivery manager for two UK government digital exemplar projects

    Consultant, trainer, coach, founder

    #hello, my name is Mike Burrows

  • Karl ScotlandEmail: kjscotland@googlemail.comTwitter: @kjscotlandBlog: availagility.co.uk

    Founding member of Limited WIP Society and Lean Systems Society

    Brickell Key Community Contribution Award 2013 Creator of Kanban Thinking (with the Kanban

    Canvas), the Ball Flow Game, and the Lego Flow Game (with Sallyann Freudenberg)

    Consultant, trainer, coach

    #hello, my name is Karl Scotland

  • Dont be a jerk,be excellent to each other!

    http://leanagile.scot/code-of-conduct/

    This is a workshop

  • Coaching Strategy deployment Strategy planning

    Values-based delivery assessment

    Debrief / action workshop

    Transformation strategy framework

    Transparency | Balance | Collaboration | Customer Focus | Flow | Leadership

    Lean-Agile | Kanban | Clean Language | Cynefin | Lean Startup | A3 | Servant Leadership

    AgendashiftTransforming Lean-Agile transformation

  • A proud member of the

    Context for change (1)

    In groups of 3 to 5 (4 is ideal)

    1. Clarify together: What (roughly) is the organisational scope of the exercise?

    2. Identify any stakeholders you may need to represent

    3. On your own behalf, write down at least one problem, challenge or objective for each of the following levels: Personal Team Corporate

    4. In your group, try to do the same on behalf of unrepresented stakeholders

  • A proud member of the

    Context for change (2)

    Taking turns in the roles of client (representing yourself or role-playing for an absent stakeholder), coach, and scribe (note taker), identify desired outcomes The client starts by stating a problem, challenge or objective from the

    previous exercise

    Using only the phrases below, the coach guides the conversation (And) What would you like to have happen? (And) then what happens? (And) what happens before X? Is there anything else about X? What kind of X (is that X)?

    The scribe notes down anything that sounds like a potentially relevant outcome (not problems or solutions) #cleanlanguage

  • Complicated The right plan is knowable

    through expert analysis

    Obvious The right plan is evident with minimal expertise

    Complex The path will be knowable

    only in hindsight

    Chaos There is no right path;

    we must act first #cynefin four points contextualisation

    (Disorder)

    Context for change (3)

  • A proud member of the

    Assessment

    Mindful of context, score the 18 prompts across these 6 categories:

    1. Transparency2. Balance3. Collaboration4. Customer focus5. Flow6. Leadership

    Which are you most drawn to? Use the star functionality (sparingly) as you finish each category

  • A proud member of the

    The Agendashift scoring scale

    1. Barely started little evidence, if any

    2. Early gains sporadic evidence, not widespread or consistent

    3. Getting there evident, but improvement or more consistency needed

    4. Nailing it, consistently firmly established, widely and consistently evident

  • A proud member of the

    Agree areas for attention

    Prioritise prompts for your team as follows: Generate: Quickly and silently, identify on separate sticky notes

    one to three prompts per person from the assessment that represent promising areas of potential change

    Organise: Group sticky notes together by category. As you add your sticky note, explain your choice

    Prioritise: Dot vote to identify your teams top three

    Prepare to report back: Your top three prompts and why theyre important Which categories (values) generated the most sticky notes?

  • A proud member of the

    Desired outcomes (1)

    Taking turns in the roles of client, coach, and scribe, identify desired outcomes The client starts with a prioritised prompt Using only the phrases below, the coach guides the conversation

    (And) What would you like to have happen? (And) then what happens? (And) what happens before X? Is there anything else about X? What kind of X (is that X)?

    The scribe notes down anything that sounds like a potentially relevant outcome (not problems or solutions)

    #cleanlanguage

  • Complicated The right plan is knowable

    through expert analysis

    Obvious The right plan is evident with minimal expertise

    Complex The path will be knowable

    only in hindsight

    Chaos There is no right path;

    we must act first

    (Disorder)

    Desired outcomes (2)

    #cynefin four points contextualisation

  • Complicated The right plan is knowable

    through expert analysis

    Obvious The right plan is evident with minimal expertise

    Complex The path will be knowable

    only in hindsight

    Chaos There is no right path;

    we must act first

    (Disorder)

    Desired outcomes (3)

    #cynefin four points contextualisation

    Competition Engagement Exploration Ecosystems Evolution

  • A proud member of the

    Generate and prioritise actions

    Prioritise actions for your team as follows: Generate: Quickly and silently, generate some action ideas on

    sticky notes for your chosen three prompts Prioritise: Dot vote or pass the cards to choose the teams top

    three actions and from those agree one that you will pursue Refine & discuss:

    Agree draft wording of your top three (And) then what happens? (about an action) (And) what needs to happen for X? (about an outcome) Revise as necessary Which are you most drawn to? Choose your teams top one Prepare to report back on all three

  • A proud member of the

    Hypothesis-driven change

    We believe that (actionable change) ____________________________

    will result in (meaningful impact) ____________________________.

    Well know that we have succeeded when (observable outcomes)___________________________

    ___________________________ ___________________________.

    #leanstartup

  • Change:Owner: Mentor:Context / scope: Aligned to objective:

    (owner)

    Copyright 2016 Agendashift (a trading name of Positive Incline Ltd)This A3 template by Mike Burrows of Agendashift (a trading name of Positive Incline Ltd) is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en_US.

    Pilot experiments (new A3s)

    Directly impacted Other stakeholders & influencers

    Assumptions & dependencies

    People Insights

    To be validated To be resolved

    Downside (to be invalidated/mitigated) Upside (to be nurtured)Hypothesis Risks

    We believe that

    will result in

    We'll know that we have succeeded when:

    AgendashiftTransforming Lean-Agile transformation

  • A proud member of the

    Assumptions, dependencies, pilot experiments

    Assumptions: What dont we know yet? Whats not yet proven or demonstrated [1] What would have to be true for this option to look fantastic? [2] Neither validated nor invalidated

    Dependencies: What isnt in place yet?

    for a demonstrably successful implementation

    What pilot experiments should we conduct first? Significantly quicker and cheaper than the experiment as a whole Potential for massive savings in time, money, and reputation

    [2] Roger L. Martin, in Lafley, A. G. and Roger L. Martin. 2013. Playing to Win, How Strategy Really Works (Boston: Harvard Business Press)

    [1] See PMBOK definition

  • A proud member of the

    Risks

    What potential downsides exist with this change? How should we be prepared to mitigate them?

    What potential upsides should we look for? How can we nurture them?

    Is this experiment safe-to-fail?

    Additional pilot experiments needed?

  • A proud member of the

    Quick recap

    Hypothesis Actionable change, meaningful impact, measures

    Assumptions & dependencies What (outside our control) would need be true to

    make this option fantastic? What must we put in place to ensure success

    Risks Downside (with mitigations), upside (to nurture) Safety

    Pilot experiments

  • A proud member of the

    People

    For your specific change, identify these stakeholders:

    Those impacted Influencers Customers & other beneficiaries of the change Management & governance

    Q: Who holds a veto?

    Q: How will you go about building a coalition for change?

  • A proud member of the

    Organise experiments for implementation

    Adapted from Jeff Andersons The Lean Change Method; see also Ash Mauryas Running Lean

    AgreeUrgency

    Nego,ateChange

    ValidateAdop,on

    VerifyPerformance Complete

    Next Adopted

    RevertedSoon

    Rejected

    NewAbandoned

  • A proud member of the

    Organise experiments for implementation

    Walk your most urgent change across the board. What specific conversations are you having at each stage? With whom?

    AgreeUrgency

    NegotiateChange

    ValidateAdoption

    VerifyPerformance Complete

    Next Adopted

    RevertedSoon

    Rejected

    NewAbandoned

    How frequently will you review the board? Who needs to be there?

  • A proud member of the

    Plan the path

    1. Refine existing [kanban] systems

    6. Explore fitness for purpose

    2. Improve the service experience

    3. Manage the knowledge discovery process

    4. Balance demand and capability

    5. Address sources of dissatisfaction and other motivations for change

    Transparency

    Leadership

    Flow

    Customer focus

    Balance

    Collaboration

  • A proud member of the

    1. Review your top 3 actions and all outcomes relevant to them

    2. In the style of an Agendashift prompt (examples below), compose some sentences that will be more true if your outcomes are achieved

    We identify dependencies between work items in good time and sequence them accordingly

    Our vision and purpose are clear to us, our customers, and our stakeholders

    We ensure that opportunities for improvement are recognised and systematically followed through

    3. Can you identify any common themes, strategies, assumptions, or values not previously articulated?

    4. Do you have the right set of initial actions? Sure about the follow-through?

    Full circle

  • A proud member of the

    Coaching Strategy deployment Strategy planning

    Values-based delivery assessment

    Debrief / action workshop

    Transformation strategy framework

    Transparency | Balance | Collaboration | Customer Focus | Flow | Leadership

    Lean-Agile | Kanban | Clean Language | Cynefin | Lean Startup | A3 | Servant Leadership

    AgendashiftTransforming Lean-Agile transformation

  • A proud member of the

    Clean Language

    Created by the late David Grove

    Further developed by James Lawler & Penny Tompkins

    Recommended reading:

    The Five Minute Coach: Improve Performance Rapidly Lynne Cooper & Mariette Castellino (2012)

    Clean Language: Revealing Metaphors and Opening Minds Wendy Sullivan & Judy Rees (2008)

    From Contempt to Curiosity: Creating the Conditions for Groups to Collaborate Using Clean Language and Systemic Modelling Caitlin Walker (2014)

    References and acknowledgements

  • A proud member of the

    The Cynefin framework

    Created by Dave Snowden Founder and chief scientific officer, Cognitive Edge

    Recommended reading:

    A leaders framework for decision making David J. Snowdon & Mary E. Boone (2007, Harvard Business Review) hbr.org/2007/11/a-leaders-framework-for-decision-making

    The Cynefin Mini-Book Greg Brougham (2015, InfoQ) www.infoq.com/minibooks/cynefin-mini-book

    Finding Your Place on the Framework Simon Powers www.adventureswithagile.com/2016/04/11/cynefin-review-part-7-finding-your-place-on-the-framework/

    References and acknowledgements

  • A proud member of the

    Lean Startup

    Created by Eric Ries

    Recommended reading:

    Running Lean: Iterate from plan A to a plan that works Ash Maurya (2012)

    The Lean Startup: How constant innovation creates radically successful businesses Eric Ries (2011)

    References and acknowledgements

  • A proud member of the

    A3

    Developed inside Toyota

    Recommended reading:

    Managing to Learn: Using the A3 management process to solve problems, gain agreement, mentor, and lead John Shook (2010)

    Understanding A3 Thinking: A Critical Component of Toyota's PDCA Management System Durward K. Surbek II & Art Smalley (2008)

    References and acknowledgements

  • A proud member of the

    Kanban, the Kanban Method

    Kanban was developed inside Toyota

    The Kanban Method was developed by David J. Anderson; it describes the application of kanban to creative knowledge work

    Recommended reading:

    Kanban from the Inside: Understand the Kanban Method, connect it to what you already know, introduce it with impact Mike Burrows (2014)

    Essential Kanban Condensed David J. Anderson & Andy Carmichael (2016)

    Kanban: Successful evolutionary change for your technology business David J. Anderson (2010)

    References and acknowledgements

  • A proud member of the

    Servant Leadership

    An ancient idea developed most notably by Robert K. Greenleaf in the 1970s

    Recommended reading in this and related subjects:

    Servant Leadership: A journey into the nature of legitimate power and greatness Robert K. Greenleaf (2012, 25th anniversary edition released)

    Organizational Culture and Leadership Edgar H. Schein (2010)

    The Fifth Discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization Peter Senge (2nd Edition, 2006)

    References and acknowledgements